Recently, it’s been reported that there was a large number of fake comments posted in support of the FCC plan to roll back net neutrality. And the FCC hasn’t been that enthusiastic about tackling, or even discussing, the issue, even when they were being called out by New York state’s investigation into the matter. But now it seems that the FCC is changing course and intends to cooperate with the state’s investigation

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced that the FCC Inspector General's office has “reversed course” and now will work with the state.

“Federal law guarantees every American a voice in shaping our policies. But my office’s investigation found that this process was deeply corrupted – with one million comments that may have been submitted using real people’s stolen identities,” said Attorney General Schneiderman. “For months the FCC refused to help us get to the bottom of what happened. That’s why we asked New Yorkers to help – and in the last few days alone, thousands of Americans and hundreds of New Yorkers have reported that their identities were misused. Finally, just this morning, the FCC Inspector General’s office indicated that it may help. We’re going to hold them to that – and, in the meantime, it’s vital that the FCC delay the vote until we know what happened.”

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It isn’t clear how cooperative the FCC will actually be, but it’s at least at step forward, considering that they’ve been basically silent on this issue.

A few days ago, 28 US Senators sent a letter to the FCC asking them to delay their vote on whether to rollback net neutrality or not. And now the Internet Association — which includes Amazon, Netflix and Uber — likewise just sent a letter to the FCC asking them to delay their vote.

"This draft order ignores the wishes of tens of millions of Americans who, like us, have voiced their support for the 2015 Open Internet Order," Internet Association CEO Michael Beckerman said in the letter. "IA and its members will continue our fight to preserve the 2015 Order and its strong, enforceable net neutrality protections."
 

Sean Berry is a blogger and Videomaker Associate Editor.