TheGrimmSleeper

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • in reply to: Noise Reduction / Elimination #166407
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Yep, visual noise – thanks!

    in reply to: Device Control in FCE HD #196387
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    I do need to import into FCE; don’t own a copy of Quicktime Pro and it’s not really an option to buy at the moment. I’m shooting with standard def, not hi def, so that’s not an issue.

    If I can’t do both, it’s not a huge deal; it would certainly be a time saver but I don’t want to have to do more takes simply because the computer glitches out on me. Having a reliable “monitor” is a lot more important.

    in reply to: Device Control in FCE HD #196385
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Perfect, that did it.

    The next question I think I know the answer to but I want to see if it’s possible just the same. Can the size of the “Capture” window in FCE be adjusted?

    This whole thing started as an experiment to use my iMac as a monitor, but being able to capture live seems even more practical. If I can have my cake and eat it too (use the iMac as a decent sized monitor and capture the footage as we’re filming) then I’d be thrilled. If not I might make other monitor arrangements (I’ve got a smallish tv that would work okay). I’d just like to have the capture window a bit larger but I don’t see that it’s resizeable at all.

    in reply to: Trimming the Fat #192241
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Ah yes, that would be the “Grimm Sleeper”. I have a friend and associate who happens to be a 3D artist. I asked him if he’d be interested in doing that and explained what I wanted, and that is the result.

    He did another one for me for “Beyond the Storm Productions” which is the “name” I use for wedding videography. It’s just as impressive!

    in reply to: DFN #183098
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Thanks, Jim. I’ve been doing that actually, but I thought the filter might provide a more believable appearance. I’ve actually been white balancing off of an orange card. Guess I’ll cross that off my list — not too broken up over it either, as there’s a ton of other gear I need to invest in, and the DFN filters I’ve seen (none in the size I needed them) are expensive.

    in reply to: Movie sound on a budget #175823
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Depends partly on the camera you’re using. Does it have an XLR input or the smaller mini-jack input? That will help narrow down what your mic options are. I use an Audio Technica ATR-55 (mini-jack) and it works fairly well. It was inexpensive too, only $55. XLR mics offer better quality, though they’re usually a bit more. You can get XLR adapters for the mini-jack too.

    I’ve never tried using lavs on a feature but those are generally tough to hide from the camera and more suited to interviews, weddings, etc. If you get a decent shotgun mic you should be able to use that; you’ll just need a boom operator to walk alongside your actors, or else re-record the audio after the scene is shot.

    in reply to: Trimming the Fat #192239
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    The WMV turned out pretty horribly. It was nice and compact but the resolution was horrific. Might give the mp4 a run, assuming it’s a format MySpace and YouTube both support. I’ve Googled for tutorials on exporting but most of them are pretty vague about this part of the process… suggesting to me that this is either so basic I should know it already, or it’s too complicated for a simple web tutorial.

    I recall finding endless tutorials on bit trimming and such for Adobe Premiere / Encore back when Encore first launched. Of course the equations for that made my eyes cross.

    Thanks for the response, at any rate!

    in reply to: Trimming the Fat #192237
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Kind of dead here… not a lot of Final Cut users…?

    in reply to: share your opinions! #164825
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    I used to only use Premiere, but when I bought my iMac I also purchased Final Cut. Because I had worked with Premiere, I was able to get into Final Cut with a fairly minimal learning curve. Even then, most of my actual learning was less Final Cut and more the Mac’s OSX, which I was totally unfamiliar with at the time. I’ve found I actually prefer Final Cut more, and I know more about it than I ever knew Premiere. Still I chalk the smooth transition up to my previous experience with Premiere.

    in reply to: Stackable Filters #164820
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Thanks for responding, Ken. I haven’t noticed any vignetting with the wide angle lens fortunately. I’ll be sure to watch for the anti-reflection coatings when investing in my next filter(s). Thanks!

    in reply to: Better Lighting #164599
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Thanks a lot for the advice and the links. It was really helpful to see what could have been improved upon in the shot above as well. We’re outside shooting this week, but for our next indoor scene I will be sure to put these techniques to good use.

    in reply to: filters??? #164389
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    franky92 Wrote:

    a filter for Day-for-Night,etc…

    Lots of options here. I’m not familiar with your model of camera but if it has manual white balance control, set the white balance to something orange or yellow. This causes a blue, kind of night-time tint. You may also want to close the iris a bit to make it a bit darker. There’s a better description of this technique in this thread: http://www.videomaker.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=5339

    I tried it, and actually went outside a few days back to give it a test run. It worked wonderfully. I was in a fairly dense forest. The only issue was when the sun light came through the trees and created white patches on the ground, but that was workable. It’s certainly a more cost effective option than buying a DFN filter. I’ve seen them priced for well over $200.

    You can also do it in post (Vegas is great from what I’ve heard; I use Final Cut myself). The advantage to that is that your original footage looks "normal", in contrast to the above where the footage actually has the blue tint directly on it. On the downside it can take awhile to adjust the color and brightness to look believable.

    Another thought for your lens softening issue. If you’re doing a stationary shot you could try using a c-clamp on some kind of stand or extra tripod positioned right in front of the camera to hold the filter in place. Getting some gels might work too using that method.

    in reply to: Best lens for close-ups #164370
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Jim – thanks! I didn’t try that blow-for-blow in my first test run so I’ll give it a whirl. It’s a film, not an interview, but you’re correct as to what I want – blurry background with focus falling on the character closer to the camera. In that vein, I’m thinking I might want to further complicate things by switching focus – blurring the foreground and focusing on the character in the back about mid-way through the shot. I know it’s a pretty standard thing but with cheap gear standard is so high tech. 😉

    Spencer, thanks for the confirmation. I think the reflector might work particularly well in this shot, though it might not be practical for wider shots where more coverage is needed. In those cases I’ll definitely apply diffusion as you mentioned above. Couldn’t find any china balls on Ikea’s website – do they go under another name by chance?

    My continued gratitude!

    in reply to: Best lens for close-ups #164367
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Would an external telephoto lens (like this for example) be of value for the close-ups? I ran a test shot with my lens zoomed all the way in and the iris as open as I could get it, but it didn’t quite achieve the effect I was looking for.

    I realize with this camera there’s only so much one can do to achieve a decent film look.

    I did test drive the night-time settings described in this thread and I’ve got to say, they worked like a charm. Had to close the iris a bit to make it darker but it was a very convincing look and definitely more practical than buying a $200 DFN filter (at least for the moment).

    I was also wondering, would it be practical, to achieve a softer effect using those harsh halogen work lights, to simply bounce it off a reflector versus trying to diffuse it?

    Thanks again for the advice.

    in reply to: Best lens for close-ups #164365
    AvatarTheGrimmSleeper
    Participant

    Thank you for the reply. I’ve found several ND filters for my size camera so that will work out nicely.

    I’ve done a short film in the past (with a much older camera in much worse lighting conditions) so what you’ve said makes a great deal of sense. Lighting is definitely something I need some practice with and it’s one of my main focus points in this trailer. I have several of the halogen work lamps on stands and one that’s attached to an extra tripod via c-clamp. I’m sure there are ways to diffuse those a bit; I’ll research that.

    Fortunately, I’ve got a shotgun mic and a boom so the audio won’t be an issue.

    Again, thanks – very concise and informative and – best of all – very usable information.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)

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