SafeHarbor

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 58 total)
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  • in reply to: I cannot finalize my video to play in DVD Player #277954
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    To create a DVD that will work in set-top DVD players, you must use DVD “Authoring” software. It’s not enough to just “burn” a video clip to a DVD-R disc. The files on the disc must meet the DVD specification, meaning you will see .vob files on the disc if you browse it on the computer.

    Do a web search for “DVD authoring software” and you will find many low-cost or even free options.

    You mentioned Movie Maker, I assume the free Windows software? You might have DVD Maker on your computer already and that would work, please check. I think it was still part of Windows 7, but not included with newer versions.

    Thanks

    Jeff

    in reply to: Shooting SD with HDV Tape? #214333
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    After 8 years of only ever using DV tape in my two HDV camcorders..yep, pretty confident. If anyone tells you that HDV tape will record a “better picture” or “better resolution” they are full of beans.

    Consider this: you have a video clip, say an .mp4 file. You have multiple copies on hard drive, USB stick, CD data disc, SD card, cloud. ALL copies will be identical quality – it’s a digital file. Like a Word doc – the text doesn’t change when you copy to a different device, right? Same with DV versus HDV tape stock. SAME content on either. As mentioned in earlier post, supposedly less chance of the occasional dropout if using HDV tape for HDV recording, otherwise it’s marketing hype to get more money from the consumer. Stick an “HDV” label on a DV tape and triple the price…

    I won’t argue for a moment that back in the day when I started in video shooting ANALOG (Hi8, SVHS) that quality tape stock recorded a better image than cheaper tapes. It mattered due to the way the analog signal was recorded to tape. But apples and oranges, we are now talking DATA with DV and HDV recordings, and ones and zeroes are always ones and zeroes on any tape stock. Many years ago, I would shoot DVCAM video onto $45 Sony DVCAM-184 cassettes, then make Firewire dubs to a cheap Digital8 HandyCam using Hi8 tape stock. SAME IMAGE recorded to either tape, identical data, different medium is all.

    Thanks

    Jeff Pulera
    Digital Vision

    in reply to: Beginner’s worst nightmare #212113
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    I have seen videographers using old VHS cameras to RECORD video for music videos and such where a retro-look is wanted. If that is your application, ok. But don't stick 20-yr-old movies into the camera! The old tape can be shedding and clog the head, or other issues. Use NEW tape for recording. Use a cheap (newer) VHS deck to watch movies if you are so inclined.

    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    I've worked with a lot of camcorders and have yet to see one that would not provide live video output while shooting. My Canon HV20 has a menu option, as Jack mentioned, something to the effect of "DISPLAY" being either "LCD" or "LCD/AV OUT" and you would want the second option obviously.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera

    http://www.sharbor.com

    in reply to: need help with burning a disc #211706
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    What software are you using to edit and/or burn to DVD? Many NLE software packages will handle the "spanned clips" just fine. Put them back to back in the timeline and export to DVD. No need for the complicated "joining" business usually.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor Computers

    in reply to: How to make crawling text appearing from center in PP? #211676
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    The sample looks like something done in Adobe After Effects – there is a "motion blur" effect on the title movement. There are hundreds of text animation presets in AE.

     

    Could likely simulate using keyframes for motion in Premiere, also using Crop and Gaussian Blur (keyframed) .

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor

    in reply to: Achieving the bokeh look with my Canon G30 #211203
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    G30 Bokeh. Would that be considered an oxymoron?

     

    But seriously, those are several great tips to try for users of small sensor cameras.

     

    Jeff

    in reply to: Help setting the gain on my camcorder #210898
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    On my old Sony VX-2000, I could go up to +9 gain, while my Sony FX7 HDV camera can't handle more than +6 without the image getting really grainy.

     

    Here's a tip – set the shutter to manual, and change from default 60 down to 30, and this will brighten the image by a stop or two. With fast motion/fast pans, this could add a little bit of a strobing, but for a church service you should not notice any ill effects, just a brighter picture. I've done this for years when shooting wedding services in darker churches.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor Computers

    in reply to: HDV 1440i #210865
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    Each TV or cable station is going to have it's own set of requirements/rules about what they accept. Of course, if the footage is unique or rare, then it could be valuable even if shot on VHS.

     

    That said, many broadcasters do require full 1920×1080, shot using 4:2:2 color and a minimum 50Mbps data rate, but that will vary.

     

    HDV footage in reality could be converted to ProRes for instance, for delivery at 1920×1080 with 4:2:2 color and if the original footage was really clean, it may not matter that it was HDV to start with.

     

    So check with the TV station for starters. If you plan on shooting documentary footage, or contributing news footage on a regular basis, consider a camera upgrade.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor Computers

    in reply to: How to capture video from DV through USB #210845
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    DV takes about 13GB per hour when captured as DV via Firewire (keeping it native). Always. Don't know where that 5GB figure comes from.

     

    To capture DV footage natively, one MUST use a Firewire (1394) connection to the computer. DV cannot be captured natively via USB.

     

    A different option for someone without access to a computer with Firewire is to buy some type of capture device that can accept an analog video signal, such as Composite or S-video, as an input from the camcorder.

     

    This device MIGHT connect via USB to the computer, but it is NOT capturing "DV" video. It will compress the analog video using MPEG-2 or H.264 to bring the file size and data rate down to something that USB can keep up with. These are budget units that will have poor video quality. But maybe good enough for your needs.

     

    On the higher end, something like a Matrox MX02 Mini or Black Magic Intensity Pro connect to a PC via PCI-e card interface, and can capture the analog signal using a high-quality AVI codec, or even as uncompressed video (if the hard drive is adequate).

     

    I just went to Amazon and entered "USB video capture" and there are PLENTY of very cheap USB units with the "yellow-red-white" analog RCA inputs, so maybe that will meet your needs. But it is not "DV capture for certain. Perhaps your local big-box electronics store might have something similar, though you will pay a lot more.

     

    Thank you

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor

     

     

     

     

     

    in reply to: How to capture video from DV through USB #210822
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    Video from MiniDV tape can never be captured via USB, you must use the Firewire 1394 port. Many video cameras can capture still images and that is what the USB port would be for.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor Computers

    in reply to: Help with burning dvd #210257
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    Best to not encode twice if you can help it. From Premiere, you can use Adobe Media Encoder to create the DVD assets directly. Choose "MPEG-2 DVD" as the FORMAT, then use the appropriate PRESET such as "NTSC Widescreen Progressive". Adjust the bitrate if necessary to fit the content on a DVD – there are bitrate calculators online to help with that. Note that this method creates separate video and audio files, .m2v and .wav, which are what Adobe Encore expects.

     

    Third-party DVD authoring software might not accept the two files and may require a multiplexed file (audio and video combined). If so, rather than using H.264 which has a lot of compression, consider a "lossless" .avi codec such as UT or Lagarith. This will create a much larger file, but with the very minimum of compression loss, then your DVD software can transcode that high-quality intermediate file to the required MPEG-2 format.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

     

    in reply to: Wedding Lighting on Camera? #209999
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    I've been using a Z96 led light from F&V for a few years and absolutely love it! Runs on either AA batts or Sony camera battery. Dimmable, includes magentic diffusion filters.  Very even lighting, no hotspot. Turn the power down for closer shooting, crank it up for farther shots. No way you can shoot receptions with room lighting only. Many of the DJ packages no longer include ANY lights – the venue dims their lighting down to nothing for the dancing and that's it, it's very dark a lot of times. Extra light is a must.

     

    Did a wedding at a botanical garden recently, and the couple and officiant were going to be standing under a gazebo. I realized prior to the ceremony that by the time the ceremony would take place, it was going to be getting pretty dark out, and NO lights were provided (no one thought of it I guess) – I would have no chance at all of decent video!

     

    I actually took the LED light and duct-taped it up inside the front edge of the gazebo shining down on the 3 people, and it looked great for my two cameras placed several years away. Became an instant hero with the photographer, and I'm sure the guests also appreciated being able to see something that otherwise would've been very, very dark.

     

    Don't get a cheap light…the Z96 is well under $200 and worth every cent. I've tried smaller lights and beyond a few feet, useless.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera

     

    in reply to: How big a deal is PAL recording? #209676
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    In deference to the world's foremost video expert, Dr. Gideon Peter Tunguy-Demarais, I have removed my offending post. 

     

    Best regards,

     

    Jeff Pulera

    in reply to: Audio for a talk show? #209507
    AvatarSafeHarbor
    Participant

    If the budget is tight, Radio Shack sells a decent wired lavalier microphone for maybe $30-40, and you'll also want to get a "headphone extension cable" so that the wire will reach your camcorder. If you record to a digital recorder, as mentioned you can't monitor to know what you are recording, plus you also then have to sync the audio later in post. The lav option would seem best suited to your needs. Nice thing is no dropouts/hiss that one can get with a wireless, just nice clean sound.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 58 total)

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