kevincopeland

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Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • kevincopelandkevincopeland
    Participant

    I’ve had good success with the Panasonic DMC-G7.
    I purchased 2 additional lenses, wide angle and 50, equivalent for a faster f-stop.

    What is your budget? Have you considered live switching and recording a ‘line cut’, then iso recording each camera for edits? Blackmagic Design ATEM switchers are great for this starting at about $995.

    in reply to: Panning Migraine #72009059
    kevincopelandkevincopeland
    Participant

    It sounds like the head is not screwed on tight enough to the extension pole, or the set screws are loose. Crank the pole up and look underneath. There should be several set screws under there. Unscrew them and then unscrew the head from the pole and check everything. Then screw the head back on. You may have to tighten the pan lock to get the head screwed on tight enough. Then screw in the set screws. I hope this helps.

    in reply to: I am new. I have to teach an online video class. #72008773
    kevincopelandkevincopeland
    Participant

    I would record your presentation on a camera, then output your PowerPoint to a screen and a separate H264 recorder. Make sure the same audio goes to both the camera and H264 recorder. This will help you sync them up later for editing.

    Then edit those together in Premiere Pro. Make sure your PowerPoint is widescreen format like your video camera (16:9). Make sure text is not too small and you give some margin around the edges of the slides.

    This Hauppauge HD PVR Rocket Portable HD Game Recorder is perfect for this. $128. Records on USB stick in H264 format. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1013313-REG/hauppauge_1540_hd_pvr_rocket.html

    kc

    in reply to: WORST panner in the world; give me tips please #72008772
    kevincopelandkevincopeland
    Participant

    At our church, I always tell my guys to use their body to pan. We are using more of a ‘studio’ configuration with small manfrotto heads and dual pan handles. Both hands on the pan handles. Don’t pan with your arms, but use your body to pan side to side smoothly. Ramp up and ramp down. Takes a lot of practice, especially for volunteers who only do this once a week at church.

    Of course a good fluid head will make your life a lot easier too.

    kc

    in reply to: Cheapest DIY Motorized Slider #72008771
    kevincopelandkevincopeland
    Participant

    This has worked well for me. Controller, motor, battery, and parallex so it mechanically pans the camera if you want. About $400. Probably not suited for heavy cameras. I’ve used with a Panasonic DMC-G7 for great 4K interviews.

    https://smile.amazon.com/GVM-Motorized-Stabilizer-120-degree-Photograph/dp/B07B6FTYCG/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?keywords=aj+slider&qid=1551208436&s=electronics&sr=1-1-spons&psc=1

    kc

    in reply to: how can i combine ppt and video? #72008770
    kevincopelandkevincopeland
    Participant

    I find the best way to do this is to record the PowerPoint live during the presentation. Split the signal from the computer with a distribution amp and send 1 feed to your Production switcher or recorder.

    Ideally you would run everything through a production switcher and live switch to PPT when needed, or do a split screen or PIP. ISO record your camera, PowerPoint and the line cut. Then when editing later you can tweak as much as you want. This also ensures that PowerPoint animations are recorded as the speaker presented.

    Or you could get a copy of the PPT from the speaker and edit it in later. I like to record the PPT on a video rather than export stills of the slides.

    I use this stand-alone game recorder to record PPT, YouTube, web pages, etc. Hauppauge HD PVR Rocket Portable HD Game Recorder. $128. Records on a USB stick in H264.

    The problem is that most presenters are not very good at designing graphics or PowerPoint slides. It looks terrible, off centered, no margins, small text, 4:3 instead of 16:9, etc.

    I have re-designed slides for speakers to make them ‘video’ friendly. That can be very time consuming. It’s not always an option but it helps increase production value. I strive to make my live recordings switched well so I don’t have to edit these in Premiere Pro later.

    kc

    kevincopelandkevincopeland
    Participant

    I thought I would have more flexibility by hiring a coder for my site and I would perform simple updates. It was a nightmare. He couldn’t get it to look like I wanted. I then hired another guy to fix it and it was just as bad as the first. Responsive didn’t work right, fonts were wrong, wrong size, stuff not centered or justified, contact form bad, etc.

    I ended up using WIX and it has been amazing. I built it myself, it’s easy and it just works. SimpleSupers.com

    kc

    in reply to: Laptop – PC specs for video editiing #72008768
    kevincopelandkevincopeland
    Participant

    Gaming laptops are suited well for video editing. I’m editing with Premiere Pro on my ASUS GL702VM-DS74 ROG laptop. It gives me the laptop display and 2 other display outputs. Intel i7, Nvidia graphics. It has Thunderbolt 3 with the USB 3.1 type C jack. 32gb ram.

    You need all that speed, especially for 4k editing. All that speed is very important, but most importantly hard drive speed. All that speed won’t matter if video can’t get to and from your hard drive. Don’t expect to have great results with a USB bus powered drive. It will help to make proxies when you import your 4k footage. Premiere will use the low res proxies when editing, but export using the original 4k hi rez clip.

    For proper hard drive speed you need a Thunderbolt 3 RAID system with 3 or 4 7200 rpm drives, or fast SSD drives.

    I also use this Laptop for multiple other tasks. One is for an input into a video production switcher. I use it to overlay live titles and animated graphics for our churches live stream. I use the SimpleSupers.com app with PowerPoint. This gives me a character generator for animated lower thirds, lyrics, sermon notes. 2 outputs to the production switcher, key and fill with correct alpha channel for the Downstream keyer. I play out the intro and outro for our sermon using PowerPoint.

    I also use this laptop for connecting web participants for another ministry. During our live stream, one of our hosts is in Alaska. I connect him to our live stream using Wirecast’s Rendezvous on this laptop, then input into our ATEM production switcher, just like a camera in our studio. He sees a multiview from the ATEM video switcher and I can switch to him whenever I want. I send him mix minus from our Mackie audio mixer so we don’t get feedback.

    This laptop is about 2 years old but is still going strong and very fast. I also use a 2011 iMac to edit. I’m cross platform so editing Windows and Mac. The best of both worlds.

    kc

    in reply to: What do I need to get started doing live streaming? #72008764
    kevincopelandkevincopeland
    Participant

    There are a lot of options. Software based. Hardware based. In my experience, it’s always better to use stand-alone hardware products to stream or record rather than using a computer with software, (ie OBS, Xsplit, Wirecast, etc.) With a computer, there always seems to be something that slows it down. Screen savers, other programs running, failure to reboot, automatic updates, hard drive speed, dropped frames, etc.

    For mixing video, I would use one of the Blackmagic ATEM Production Switcher products. https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/atemtelevisionstudio/techspecs/W-APS-08

    $995, 8 inputs. You can switch cameras on the front of the unit, and/or use their software control to switch inputs, fade up titles, dissolves, etc. Send a program output to monitors in your church, and to your streaming device. Some of the ATEM switchers include AUX outputs so you can send different video feeds to different places. Such as sending a camera feed to a monitor in your worship center, a ‘dirty feed’ to your nursery, a ‘clean feed’ to a recorder that doesn’t include lower thirds, etc. The ATEM Switcher software has multiple tabs to control audio sources, media loaded into media players (stills or titles with alpha channel), camera control (if you have Blackmagic Design supported cameras). You can customize buttons and your Multiview. Very cool software.

    Keep in mind that most of the BMD ATEM switchers require that all signals arrive in the same format as the switcher. So if it is set up for 1080i 59.94, then all cameras and other inputs arrive at the same format. It won’t scale, but the on board frame synchronizers let you use inputs that don’t need to be genlocked. You can use an UpDownCross converter to remedy this. Also keep in mind that if using cameras for IMAG in your Sanctuary/Worship Center, that there will be a slight delay because of processing. Genlocked cameras will reduce this latency.

    Our church also uses a Blackmagic Design Smart Videohub to route signals to all the TV’s in our building. We run SDI cables to all TV’s. SDI cables from all cameras to the video switcher. Then convert SDI-HDMI at the TV’s with converters powered by USB from the TV. HDMI-SDI converters from cameras that don’t have SDI outputs. There is software control for this so you can route signals from your computer.

    Our Worship Center iMac runs ProPresenter for our large projector and side screens. We split this HDMI signal with a distribution amp, HDMI-SDI converter and run that to our ATEM production switcher upstairs. We use an UpDown Cross converter from BMD to get it to the right format for our ATEM switcher.

    For live animated titles and lower thirds, I use the SimpleSupers.com app that uses PowerPoint as a character generator. It generates an alpha channel. I use my laptop display outputs for key and fill into the ATEM’s Downstream keyer. I use it for Lower Thirds at our church. Scripture, names, song lyrics, etc. I even use it to play out our intro and outro for our ‘Sermon only’ archive.

    For streaming, I like the Teradek VidiU Pro and use it to stream to anywhere. This unit also records an H.264 video on an SD card if you want it to. Streaming to YouTube is free, Facebook is free. Twitch is free.

    For one of my clients, I set the Teradek to stream to Restream.io and let it send out to about 18 streaming platforms with their free version. They say they have 30 free platforms they stream to. Although you have to pay to include streaming to Facebook on their site.

    For recording I’ve had great success with the BMD Hyperdeck Studio Mini and the BMD UpDownCross converter. I use the UpDownCross to convert to 1080p and record H.264 on the Hyperdeck Mini’s SD cards. Saves a lot of hard drive space recording H264, rather than ProRes or other Windows formats. You can use multiple recorders and record ISO’s of your cameras, clean feeds, etc.

    A cheaper solution is a stand-alone game recorder like this Hauppauge HD PVR Rocket Portable HD Game Recorder. $128. Records on USB stick. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1013313-REG/hauppauge_1540_hd_pvr_rocket.html
    I input an HDMI signal from my ATEM switcher (converted SDI-HDMI) and it records audio and video. I set up the PVR first with my Windows machine and set the record data rate and anything else needed in the Hauppauge software. Then after that, it’s a stand-alone recorder powered by USB. A cheap solution that’s been very reliable for us.

    If you want to save money recording ISO’s, then you can use the BMD Multiview 4 processor and output it to a Hyperdeck Mini recorder in 4k. (You would have to record in ProRes or other format as H264 won’t work in 4k.) This would give you 4, 1080 cameras on a single 4k recording. You could record Cameras 1, 2 and 3, then a Program (dirty) feed or ‘Clean Feed’ on the last quadrant. Put this 4k clip in your editing program in a 1080 timeline, and zoom in on the camera you want to iso during editing. You could set is up as a multi-camera sequence and re-edit your video if needed. This would give you 3 cameras and the line cut. Very cool way to save money in iso’s and hard drive space. Or you could record an H264 clip with this recorder, https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1137279-REG/video_devices_pix_e5_5_4k_recording.html.

    At the very least, I would purchase the Teradek VidiU Pro and hook your camera directly to that for streaming. This unit will connect to your network with WiFi, but I recommend a hard wire connection. Do a speed test on your network. Upload speed is critical. Our church’s upload is 10 mbps. We’re streaming about 4 mbps for 1080 video/audio. That gives us plenty of room with that bandwidth. Keep in mind that network traffic will affect this. If you can, block out priority for your Teradek on your network router.

    God bless,
    kc

    in reply to: Newbie video recording our Church services #72008737
    kevincopelandkevincopeland
    Participant

    How is the signal input to the PC? PC’s microphone input? Like Paulears said above, you need a proper capture device. A simple USB audio device will do the trick. This one worked well for me on my Windows laptop. https://griffintechnology.com/products/audio/imic-usb-audio-adapter

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

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