jleinung

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  • in reply to: Shutter speed/angle #278256
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    Don't confuse "shutter angle" (or shutter speed) with frame rate. You mentioned you were shooting for "European settings/pal."  The PAL format specifies a frame rate of 25 frames per second (fps); U.S. (NTSC or ATSC standard) specifies 30 fps.  If "laptop footage was jolting, as if camera speed was too slow…" I suspect this was a mis-match between the frame rate the footage was shot and the rate it was played back.  You didn't specify if you were viewing the footage in a media player or in an editor – any professional editing software should be able to convert whatever frame rate the footage was shot into whatever rate your final project needs.

    BTW, "shutter angle," if we're talking about video cameras, is actually a misnomer. It is a relic (like me) from the days of film cameras with rotating shutters. The shutter was made by cutting a metal circle in half (180 degrees) and spinning it in front of the film. While the half-circle was clear of the film, light exposed the frame; when the half-circle covered the film, it was advanced to the next frame…etc. This happened every 1/24th of a second (24 fps), so half of that (180/360) was a 48th of a second exposure time.  If you had 2 disks overlapping each other, by varying the amount of overlap, you could adjust how many degrees of the circle were left open, thereby changing the exposure time. I.e., adjusted to a 90 degree shutter, you got an exposure time of 1/96th sec. (90/360 x 1/24).  So technically, today's camera makers should more accurately simply talk about shutter speed rather than "shutter angle" – it's just a nod to those of us who started out in film cameras.

    in reply to: What effect is this? #214366
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    Camera is moving, mounted on a slider probably, from the left to the right. This is technically referred to as a “dolly” or “trucking” shot. In a “Pan” the camera does move, but rotates its view horizontally (changing the degree the camera’s view is angled up or down is called a “tilt”). The background is out of focus due to a shallow depth of field. To achieve an out-of-focus background, use a wider apeture (f-stop), move foreground object closer and the background farther away. A larger image sensor will also have less depth of field than a smaller one.

    in reply to: How much do XLR to 1/8-`inch adapters degrade sound? #214164
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    The audio goodness you’re loosing to the XLR-1/8″ adapter is far less than the extra goodness you can acquire by recording your audio on a decent separate digital audio recorder. DSLRs are designed to take good-looking pictures, not record good audio. So, if you’re going to record your audio directly in the DSLR, I wouldn’t worry to much about a single adapter in the audio chain.

    in reply to: “Speach” Copyrights #214163
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    Depends. “Fair Use” in copyright law allows for limited use of copyrighted material for purposes of criticism, commentary, and parody. If you are simply trying to capitalize (accrue $ or glory for yourself) using someone else’s creative work, THATs a no-no.

    in reply to: Permission to use media question. #214161
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    A simple letter identifying yourself, referencing the media you wish to use, and describing how you’d like to use it and where and how it will be displayed, along with any compensation (or none) you are offering to the media owner should get you started. The owner can either add an endorsement to the bottom of that letter indicating they give permission, or they may choose to write their own letter stating exactly what permissions they are granting you. Best practice is to include a statement of all the ways you think you will be using their footage — for example, if you only ask for permission to use it as part of a video you will only show to community groups or in private screenings, you will NOT have permission to broadcast it over the Community Access TV channel. You can find a sample of a Materials Release at: https://www.videouniversity.com/articles/releases-for-use-in-film-and-video/ (and other release forms as well).
    Good Luck.

    in reply to: How would I Shoot a “Piano-Guys – Like” Music Video #213526
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    You will want to play back the studio-recorded audio on each location, both through monitors on set so the talent can match their playing/action to the recording, AND onto one of your camera’s audio tracks. In the edit, you use the audio track on the camera to line up with the fully mixed/eq’d studio audio.

    in reply to: FPS & Shutter Speed #213525
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    If you shoot at 24 fps and use your editing software to speed up the footage 10x (on a 24fps timeline), what it will essentially do is take (approx.) only every 10th frame, and skip all those in between. Now, usually, in video & film we actually LIKE the blur from slower shutter speeds because it smooths out our perception of motion; very high shutter speeds can make motion look unnatural (sometimes used for effect, like in the climactic shooting spree in Taxi Driver, where it was used intentionally to make the sequence jarring). If your camera’s capable of recording at a slow frame rate (with a slower shutter speed) you might want to go that way. If you can’t crank it down to 2.5 fps, slow it as much as you can, and use the edit software to get you the rest of the way.

    BUT, bottom line — SHOOT SOME TESTS: 24fps sped up in editor; slow fps(s); different shutter speeds, etc… viewing the results is really the only way to be sure you’re getting the effect you want.

    in reply to: Lighting effects #213187
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    Your using the wrong effect, first off. The “lighting effects” are for special effects, not basic corrections. You want to be using something like the ProcAmp or Luma Corrector effects. Make sure you have the Waveform Monitor open and play with the effect controls to make sure the image traces are all between 7.5 (the dotted horizontal line) and 100 IRE — keep your eye on the image also. As you play with the controls you’ll begin to see what each does, and how they interact with each other.
    As far as the “glitchy” background – at first I thought it was noise (which was being amplified along with the “good” image/signal), but it actually looks like some kind of ghost image, which I have no way to tell where it’s coming from. If it’s still there, all I can suggest is trying to cover it with another layer over your background video, with the area occupied by the talent matted out so she’ll still be visible. In the future, avoid shooting against a bright background. If you’re relying on the cameras auto-iris, shoot against a grey or medium-toned background.
    BTW – You will also want to use an external mic rather than the on-camera mic. Place the mic as close to the Talent as possible for the best sound. A good option is a small lavallier mic which can be clipped to the Talent’s wardrobe.
    Good Luck!

    in reply to: Writing to disappear #213177
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    Dude, the video is private…

    in reply to: Having trouble with green screen setup and halo/glow #213176
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    Pulling a good key from a green screen can be problematic when the footage shot is recorded in a compressed format, as nearly all “prosumer”camcorders do (I assume you’re not using a RedOne or Arri Alexa!) reduced color resolution and compression artifacts, while not obvious to the eye, make it very difficult to pull a good matte without green fringing.

    If your camera has an HDMI or RGB output, try recording those outputs into an uncompressed format directly on your computer or a separate recorder capable of uncompressed recording, rather than to the memory card in the camera. This may mean some additional hardware and/or software, but there are a lot of good quality outboard video capture or recording devices that connect to your computer via USB3 or Thunderbolt, by companies like Blackmagic Design, Aja, etc. for anywhere from $150 – $1,000 (but, read the specs!)

    in reply to: Writing to disappear #213174
    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    To be clear — you want this effect to happen to a “real world” C.U. of a handwritten list on a pad, not a graphic? Go Old School — a classic lock-down: set up your shot w/ props (including notepad) placed on prop desk/table/dresser. I’d advise actually gluing everything down – spray adhesive on the back of the pad/paper, maybe tic-tack for other props. Frame up and lock the camera in place on a solid tripod. Shoot a half minute or so of the setup – the paper should be BLANK (or contain just the items that are to remain). Carefully, without moving ANYTHING, write/add the items on the list that are supposed to disappear, and shoot another 30 sec. In the edit, you will simply dissolve from the take with the items, to the take without the items. It will look like they are disappearing while everything else remains in place. One of the simplest, oldest special FX in the book, but it works.

    Avatarjleinung
    Participant

    That's a VERY small room to try this in.  Can you shoot outside at night?  The idea is you want your actor to move from an unlit, shadow area into a lit area. Besides restricting the light from your lighting instruments to a small area, you need to make sure that there is no (or as little as possible) light bouncing off the walls of this very small room, so the walls need to be made BLACK. Even black show-card reflects some light. You want to try cover the walls in black velvet cloth if possible. Also make sure you lock your iris down to the proper exposure of your talent when they're in the light; don't let your auto-iris try to look into the shadows.  If you don't have enough room for your actor to step into a pool of light, you can try keeping him stationary and panning the lights onto him (don't raise the bridge, lower the river!).  If you shoot him from the waist up with a slight zoom in, you may be able to make it look like he's walking toward you.

    Shoot tests, and Good Luck!

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

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