Jaimie

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 94 total)
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  • in reply to: Send video through 120 feet of cable, how? #206056
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Thank you for the suggestions, I am still trying to learn exactly what signal format the remotely-located projector needs.  I'm sure one of these methods will work.

    Regards,

    Jaimie

    in reply to: Send video through 120 feet of cable, how? #205833
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Thanks Robert,  That's what I need.  I wasn't sure if I needed coax or some other type of cable and whether or not an amplifier is necessary for that distance.

    Regards,

    Jaimie

    in reply to: Is HDMI recording better than tape? #199087
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Thanks!

    in reply to: Is HDMI recording better than tape? #301628
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Thanks!

    in reply to: Is HDMI recording better than tape? #302253
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Thanks!

    in reply to: Is HDMI recording better than tape? #302752
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Thanks!

    in reply to: Is HDMI recording better than tape? #301968
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Thanks!

    in reply to: Is HDMI recording better than tape? #302911
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Thanks!

    in reply to: Is HDMI recording better than tape? #199085
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    I agree that the tape transport is a possible source of problems, especially as it ages. Currently, I record on chips using the Sony MRC recorder and on tape for backup. If I find I can use tape only, the problem is twice as serious because I play the tape back in the camera to capture it in my editor. The effect is to put twice the wear on the camera’s tape transport.

    That’s interesting about the lengths being different. I haven’t seen that problem with chips versus tape recordings, but neither involves HDMI and I use 1080i.

    in reply to: Is HDMI recording better than tape? #199083
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Thanks Jeff,

    I haven’t had any problems with the HDV format except that I noticed that recovery from a dropout takes quiet a few frames. I generally record on a chip using the Sony MRC recorder and on tape, too.

    I got interested in the HDMI output when I read that green screening can sometimes experience artifacts with HDV and the 4:2:0 compression due to the low color resolution. I haven’t done any green screening, yet, so I don’t speak from experience. But it may come up.

    I do all my editing with Adobe Premiere Pro on a PC with IEEE1394 and USB2.0 and 3.0 inputs. I have no problems capturing by playing tapes back in the camera connected to the PC via IEEE1394. How do you get the content from the Ninja into the editor? It looks to me like you just remove the Ninja’s hard drive and connect it to the PC. That would be perfect. But, file transfer is fine, too. I am not a fan of real-time transfer which I’m stuck with using tape.

    Thanks in advance for all your help.

    in reply to: Is HDMI recording better than tape? #199081
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Thanks, that’s a big help.

    Regards,

    Jaimie

    in reply to: Limits on a CMOS #199073
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    I was referring to reducing his low light problem by using the lower shutter speed. It would give an extra f-stop. Using the shortest focal length on the zoom may also, depending on the lens and the focal length he was using, may give as much as another f-stop. Neither of these tricks will do anything for the motion problems although the slow shutter speed may make them appear different.

    in reply to: Is HDMI recording better than tape? #199079
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Rob,

    Thank you very much, I did not know any of that!

    I checked the specs in the book that came with my camera, a Sony HVR-Z7u, and it doesn’t say what version of HDMI it is using. It only specifies a “Type A” HDMI connection which I believe refers to the connector style. Further, the book does not address the compression used on the tape, chip recorder or the HDMI output.

    If I might pick your brain a little more, do you know how I can determine if the video signal at the HDMI port is actually better (higher color depth, less compression wider brightness range, wider bandwidth, etc) than the same signal recorded and played back using the camera’s internal HDV tape deck? My point is maybe the HDV tape is capturing all that the camera is capable of providing. If that is the case, there is no point in buying external wider bandwidth recorders because there is nothing more to capture. It would be like copying VHS tapes onto Blu Rays. The quality is still that of a VHS tape even though it is on a high def disc.

    As an aside, I have not faced a quality problem yet as all my product has been supplied on DVDs. Nobody has ever wanted BluRay. Nevertheless, I find that editing at the highest possible quality level yields a better looking DVD. I have also found that the higher the quality of the original, the easier it is to fix up bad exposure, color etc.

    Thanks again for your help,

    Jaimie

    in reply to: Limits on a CMOS #199070
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Hi,
    Try setting the camera to 1080i to capture better fast motion. I don’t know if that will fix your problem, but I have found it better than any progressive setting for smooth fast motion. I have cameras with both cmos and ccd sensors and I don’t see a lot of difference between them although the cmos are slightly more sensitive.

    The real issue is more about noise. Is a grainy picture really all that desirable? There is some software that can reduce noise (Red Giant for example), but getting good original footage is always best.

    A trick you might try in low light situations is to set the shutter speed of the camera to 1/30 of a second if your camera allows it. Most cameras default to 1/60 of a second as their slowest speed, but often you can manually set 1/30. The 1/30 second will not degrade your ability to capture motion, but slower speeds will.

    Another trick is simply to stand closer to the subject so you can use a shorter focal length on your zoom lens. This helps because many zooms lose aperture as their focal length is increased (i.e. you zoom to a more telephoto setting). Using the shortest possible focal length gives you the widest possible aperture.

    in reply to: Wireless lavalier(s) or use the field recorder? #177092
    AvatarJaimie
    Participant

    Earl, NICE JOB!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 94 total)

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