ghostlyshark

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    yeah- avchd is not a problem- i’ve had great results from it with the canon hf100. Oh, and Vegas Pro works well with it.

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165602
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    I was wondering… At the reception, did you put all of the dancing in and try to synch the audio up?

    I edited a lot trying to filter out anything boring, but I included all formal dances in full length. I matched up both video files along with the mp3. I faded out of the audio from the video and into the mp3. This made it sound much nicer and also helped me avoid any of that interference. For the video, I kept my still shot down as the foundation and split the moving shots in order to go back to the still shots whenever the effect would look nice (or when someone stands in front of the tripod!) I messed around with it a lot too. At the end of the dance, I did my best to fade the mp3 back out as we went back to the audio from the camcorder so you can hear everyone clap and get back to the DJ’s introductions. That was about it, just the few formal dances. Other than that, the dancing was edited a lot. That part was pretty easy because I remembered what parts I thought were good throughout the night so I just skipped right to that. A montage sounds like a good idea. I suppose if I ever give this another shot, I could add one.

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165600
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    Well, I’ve been waiting to post my feedback because I’m a little superstitious. I didn’t want to call this a success prematurely. So, after advice and research, I made a decision on some very key points. First, I was able to borrow the audio recorder. I purchased the lapel mic from radio shack to hook this up. I also decided on no extra lighting. The biggest influence there was after watching my friend’s videos in which no lighting was used. It was not intrusive, but still gave great results. I also decided to not approach people for comments in the reception. I think this really allowed me to capture what the night was all about without interfering.

    In preparation for the big event, I requested to be present at the rehearsal. I left work early, I arrived early for the rehearsal. Upon my arrival, I approached the photographer as she exited her car and asked, very confidently, if she was here for the same wedding I was. She was not. I hung my head in shame, feeling very stupid…. I shook that off and got some great shots outside… a very beautiful day. So then I waited for people to show up. Meanwhile, the photographer is out and about so I give up on getting more shots. Finally, we are set for rehearsal. It could not have been any shorter, I tried to find good points to set up. Ultimately, I failed. Two major oversights here… 1) They were getting married outside under a gazebo. Almost every angle was blocked. 2) There was a wedding coming in right after their rehearsal. The rehearsal was so rushed that I had no time to prepare for the big day. And that leads me to the next day….

    I showed up an hour and a half early for the wedding. I wanted as much time as possible to prepare. So I walk down and see some people are already there. I suspect the worst, and my suspicions are confirmed. These people are here for a wedding BEFORE the one I am there for (I now don’t feel so stupid for getting photographers mixed up). So I have to wait again! And I wait, and wait, and wait. Eventually, their ceremony is over, but the wedding party is still out getting pictures taken. I was about to lose my mind. Meanwhile, my friend (the bride) shows up in her limo. She sees another wedding going on: NOT COOL. So with only minutes to spare and the previous wedding party still out, I set up my tripod as fast as I could. I set up far back with a straight shot into the gazebo, zoomed in. That was my steady shot. I set myself up on the left side, where no one was seated. Unfortunately, as the wedding party started walking down, the photographer’s assistant decided he should stick his backside in all of my shots. This became even more aggravating as he walked in front of, and in exact pace as, the flower girl. I almost wanted to tell everyone to start over. And what was worse, the phrase “you may now be seated” was never uttered. So any backup shot was nearly useless as I fumbled to gain a better shot of the bride and groom.

    In hindsight, I could have set up one camera on the right side of the gazebo, while I stayed on the left. Or, I could have at least made my timing a little better. What I actually did, was run around the gazebo, and, due to my lack of wedding experience, I missed a close shot of the groom saying “I do.” Thank God people were seated by then so that my backup shot was decent. After that small fiasco, I recovered and got great close up shots… On to the reception.

    The reception was at the same location so I was able to be in two places at once, I kept running back outside to set the tripod up in different locations. Worked out great. Inside, I was getting some great shots. The introductions came out great too. In fact, most of the reception was smooth. I nearly missed the best man’s toast. I was just unaware it was coming, and could not battle my way through a crowded room. The camera I had set up on a tripod inside was often blocked, and on one occasion, MOVED INTENTIONALLY. I was not happy when I saw that playback. Ultimately, this was a success, and all of the shots worked. I left that night fairly confident. I was excited and relieved after a day well done.

    I should also mention that the DJ and photographer were incredibly helpfull. I don’t mean to put the blame of the mistakes on them. I defintely had many mistakes due to my own error or things out of my control. So, enough of my excuses, let’s get to my mistakes.The next day, I started watching the video, and editing. Right off the bat, I realized this would be more difficult than I had perceived. I matched up the two videos plus the audio file for the ceremony. Mistake #1: The audio sampled slightly off from the video, resulting in an echo. Of course, my being a complete noob, I painstakingly MADE IT match up instead of converting first. Fortunately, the result was a perfect match. I was very happy to have this separate audio file as it made the ceremony flow perfectly. I experienced the same problem when laying over mp3 files to match up with the songs being played during the reception. I overcame this as well as I think I could. Next problem, the sounds of the camcorder’s internal mic was EXCELLENT, but picked up interference from the DJ’s equipment. So disappointing. This made for more painstaking attempts at getting the audio right. It was impossible to fix because in many parts, the audio from the camcorder was more usable than that of the audio recorder. With some ingenuity, I made this work as best I could. Mistake #2: I was in my shots. I may be too hard on myself here though because the photographer was absolutely impossible to avoid, whereas I was nearly invisible.

    Finally, there was my own creative touch to the video. I am actually really happy about trying to stay invisible. I think I was the least intrusive I could be, but still managed to capture their big day. I definitely learned a lot. So much, that I could probably write 10 times more than what I have already. There were definitely lessons to be made every step of the way, but at the same time, I pulled it off! I saw the bride today. She’s back from her honeymoon, back from work. I handed her a few dvd’s and plenty of video files. Tonight, I got home and read an e-mail from her. It made me feel really good. “It was awesome… We can’t wait to show it to everybody. You did an excellent job. We are very impressed andTHANKFUL.” I prepared for this for weeks, filmed for a day, edited for nearly two weeks, and am still working on rendering the highest quality drafts. I don’t think it’s anywhere near perfect, but I am very proud of it. What really seals the deal is that they are happy with it. I’m not one to get all mushy, but that is really cool. Thanks to everyone who posted here. I read all of these posts with attention to detail. Had I not posted here, I do not think the positive feeling I am experiencing right now would be nearly this great. Thanks again!

    -gs

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165597
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    I did well for the voice recorder… I’m borrowing an olympus ds-30for the weekend

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165596
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    thanks again

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165594
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    Then goto Radio Shack and get a lapel mic which will run you about $15. Before the ceremony, hook the lapel mic to the groom and have him put the Recorder in his pocket (and make sure you press record).

    I don’t see a lapel mic online at radioshack, is there one you could suggest?

    How about this combo?

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16836150075

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16873100014

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165593
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    Then goto Radio Shack and get a lapel mic which will run you about $15. Before the ceremony, hook the lapel mic to the groom and have him put the Recorder in his pocket (and make sure you press record).

    I don’t see a lapel mic online at radioshack, is there one you could suggest?

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165592
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    huge help Brandon! Thanks for the input

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165590
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    Great suggetions so far. Thanks. Another thing I’m wondering is how and when to approach guests at the reception, and what to ask. That may be the most frightening thing.

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165587
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    Thought of another question- would it make sense to scope out the reception hall before the wedding? I plan on going days before to get some extra footage and also to become familiar with the place, but what about the day of? I don’t know if that would give me any insight as to lighting, setup, etc….

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165585
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    Yes, lighting is a concern for me. Bringing my own lighting is not an option, I just don’t have the equipment yet. She expects this to be an amateur job, but I have also thoroughly explained that it will look dark. The only upside is that the camcorder performs well in low light.

    in reply to: Need advice for filming a wedding #165583
    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    Thanks. Let me be clear, though. The bride is a friend. She asked me to do this because she didn’t want to pay a lot of money. She was merely looking to get the day captured on film. I offered to bring my own camcorder as a backup and also edit the video for her. She wasn’t expecting me to do so much. This is just a great opportunity to get some experience. I’m not worried about money, she’s not worried about the finished edited product. I just want to make my first experience as good as it can get. Also, if anyone has any wedding clips hosted somewhere that I could take a peek at, I would love to see an example. Thanks

    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    Thanks!

    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    south of hartford

    Avatarghostlyshark
    Participant

    Thanks, Good advice!, But, I’m actually out of college. This is more of a “hindsight is 20/20” situation. I’ve got my foot in the door for a big corporation, don’t like it. Like I said, I’ve done video for them. They require all branches to post videos so we get to know each other better… I’m sure you get the point. I created our video, which took hours of fixing and mixing different file types, audio levels, cropping, etc. I even fixed another branch’s video. They tried mixing wrong codecs, sizes, file types, sampling rates… a nightmare when it came to editing everything together. And this was after two weeks of no success from the department who is supposed to handle these things! AND, I did it all from work, no luxury of a real video editor, just a couple hours tinkering with files until I got it right. But, I actually enjoyed doing that. So I have recognition from work for doing this, but I see your point- this is not really the right kind of recognition. I am hoping my filming of the wedding goes well and I learn from that. You’ve got me thinking though, what kind of organization around here could I film for?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)

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