Armchair Geographer

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Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • in reply to: Rendering Video from Two Cameras #209222
    AvatarArmchair Geographer
    Participant

    This is one type of composting called green screen composting but it is a little more complex than just mixing the picture to get two ghost angles of the same person sinked together. To have one person fade from two angles requires some lighting and exposure skill, but this is not 3D it is a form of composting that has been around since film was double exposed to give the impression of two things happening at once.

     Is Don2013 even interested or going to give us an idea of what he wants to achieve?

    in reply to: Rendering Video from Two Cameras #209198
    AvatarArmchair Geographer
    Participant

    On the other hand, if you are trying to get a split screen system you will begin in the same place. Drop your two videos into two new layers in your editing program and then search for the split screen effect. Depending on what video program you have got this can be relatively easy. One of the pictures will be on the left-hand side of the screen and the other on the right-hand side.

    in reply to: Rendering Video from Two Cameras #209197
    AvatarArmchair Geographer
    Participant

    Is it possible that what  You are trying to do is  called compositing? This is a process where two videos are placed one over the top of the other. Depending on the video software you are using you will find that you can put one video into one of the timelines and other video into another, below, timeline. Provided you have a point that you can reference everything to, this is usually a clapping sound so that you can line the two audio tracks, but if you don't have audio then you will need to have a light flash or some other point-this is what a clapping board is used for. In most professional editing suites you will be able to set the compositing level of the top video so that the other video shows through underneath. How effective your resulting picture will be will depend on things like the lighting, background elements and whether there is a lot of detail in the background of your subject. Try to have a very simple background, I hope this helps.

    in reply to: Which camera for pro movies? #208341
    AvatarArmchair Geographer
    Participant

    Yes, If you have the money for the Canon C100 it is a good camera and will give you more latitude in the field as a more professional tool. The Sony NEX series, some have the XLR audio inputs but not many cameras have the full sound picture. Use a separate audio recording system and use the camera sound to sinc things up. The balanced three pin pro audio is most important in the studio or when using external power to the camera and separate ac power to other tools as they can pick up hum. You can get hum eliminators to go from balanced to unbalanced audio or simply run DC from batteries in the field. Some more complex cameras provide a whole range of options but shooting in the field is often about getting the picture in the can and changing it in post when you bring evrything together. On sound… surround sound is easy to stuff up, but it is not hard to get right provided you find a simple formula that works for you and you stick to it through the production. Get quality mics on the tallent, lavelier or out of shot shotgun, get the surround audio on separate tracks but in sinc then bring it together in your editing process.

    in reply to: Which camera for pro movies? #208342
    AvatarArmchair Geographer
    Participant

    Another comment; even the great quality of the sony NEX on camera mic only works well if you are close to the tallent, It provides great surround sound, but the voices that are critical to your success need quality pick up close to the source and that wont work if you are using say a 100 mm or 85mm lens to get an out of focus background from a distance, even 3m is too far in a lot of cases.

    in reply to: Which camera for pro movies? #208322
    AvatarArmchair Geographer
    Participant

    I think the canon solution is very popular at the moment but it has drawbacks, like needing to get a lot of other equipment to make them into video cameras. Some of the sony solutions, nex vg 20 or 30, vg90 or the vg100 if you have the money give good results and have things like view finders, interchangable lenses and so on in a compact ready to go format. I love them and find my vg 20 to be very handy for quick set up solutions. The VG 90 is a great camera and has scope and simplicity of use on its side. The Using FCP X or even vegas to edit provides a large range of useful options for editing and post production and the continuosly expanding family of lenses built for video leaves the canon family back in the photo world which is what they are good at.

    in reply to: How to speed up videos? #207121
    AvatarArmchair Geographer
    Participant

    Vegas Pro does this quite well, but what are you using?

    in reply to: Monitor attachment #206712
    AvatarArmchair Geographer
    Participant

    That is a great question. the camer looks like it is on a tripod platform and has an attachment at the back that the monitor is attached too. Manfrotto have a stand like this.

    in reply to: Sony NEX VG20 #204291
    AvatarArmchair Geographer
    Participant

    I have had one of these for several months and enjoy it, but I wonder if people have any clues to get the best out of it. Can you record from the HDMI output and is the quality any better than the recording to the SD card?

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

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