What should I charge?

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    • #72002230
      AvatarKasai
      Participant

      Hi, new member here. I was wondering how much I should charge to make and edit videos based on my two (yes, two) works. Here’s the recent one I did (which was a year ago) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5VFG1d4yZU mind you I did the description, title, and uploaded it for him. I did another music video with him, but it wasn’t my best. Anyway, I’ve only done two videos. And the camera I use is a Sony a5000 due to it’s option of having a 24fps and 60fps format. No professional equipment, just a camera, and I edit on Sony Vegas (I’m learning to edit on Premiere). I didn’t charge him due to helping him with his career, but I do not associate with him anymore. So with just a Sony a5000, how much should I charge to make and edit a video?

    • #72002231
      AvatarJackWolcott
      Participant

      At this point you probably should stick to getting experience — and lots of critical feed-back — before charging for your work. Certainly anyone you work for should cover your out-of-pocket expenses but asking for more than that at this time is probably pushing the envelope a bit too much.

      Work on story as much as on shooting and editing; even a music video, or perhaps especially a music video, needs a strong story element generated by the music and lyrics.

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by AvatarJackWolcott.
    • #72002243
      Avatarpaulears
      Participant

      It’s not bad – but would really benefit from some for of camera stabiliser. The thing wobbles like mad as you move. For that style of product, movement is important, so getting some kind of gizmo to keep the camera level and stable is important.

      As for charging, you’ve got a problem. Musicians and rappers are always poor, always keen to get things done cheap, often with the promise of more work when they ‘make it’, which most don’t – and many of your projects will cost you in time and energy and even practical stuff like memory cards, more than they will ever be able to pay. I made the mistake of doing one very cheaply for a member of a venue entertainment team (mainly because I wanted to try out a new camera). They shared my product widely on social media, and I keep getting repeats from the same place. Trouble is, they are all very poorly paid, and I cannot get the proper rate for the job, as they don’t have the money. Equally, I need to remain friendly with the venue for other projects, so I have to keep doing them and smiling!

      One of the videos I did is still outstanding because the person got a new contract and cleared off to Spain, no longer interested in what I did, and not interested in paying for something they now don’t want. You can make videos for fun, and you can make videos for paying clients. Making videos for non-paying people is NOT fun.

      • #72002289
        AvatarKasai
        Participant

        Is there any sort of specific camera stabilizer for that camera or just any of them will do?

    • #72002254
      Avatarbobspez
      Participant

      Couldn’t finish watching the first video, too much handheld camera movement.

      • #72002286
        AvatarKasai
        Participant

        Please don’t reply if you don’t have anything to suggest. I’m aware of the camera movements, I came to ask for suggestions (at first) for charging, but now really I’m asking what can I do to improve. I’m basically restarting in making videos.

      • #72002389
        AvatarKasai
        Participant

        I apologize if I sounded a little “offended,” I just want tips on how I can improve my shooting skills. I realized I asked the wrong question, especially since I don’t have many works under my belt. They are generic works, but I would say I’m proud of my second one.

    • #72002325
      Avatarpaulears
      Participant

      Your question was how much should you charge? The answer is dependant on how good you are, and we had to judge on what you provided.To improve you need to learn how to use the camera – no need to get defensive, nobody has said it’s terrible, just that it’s difficult to watch. You can buy all sorts of stabilisers, but perhaps you need to spend some time just practicing with what you have. The first part of the video featured you moving in and flying over his shoulder – practice that move until you get the best you can. ENG camera folk developed the bent legged walk a long time ago now so they could move with the shoulder mounted camera NOT going up and down. You look a bit like the Monty Python Ministry of Silly Walks, but it works. With your lightweight camera, try holding it in a bent arm, so your arm looks like a steadi-cam, you’ll be surprised how much bounce this soaks up.You simply need to practice and practice. Once you can produce consistent steady shots you have improved enough to then concentrate more on framing. You can buy stabilisers for all weights and sizes of cameras, but the basic hand holding skills are still important. The biggest improvement anyone can make is to get better at planning so you have a plan to follow, and then you just follow the plan.

      • #72002388
        AvatarKasai
        Participant

        Right, I guess I asked the wrong question. Obviously, there is some things I can improve on and to learn. I didn’t know about a stabilizer, but I do own a Joby Gorillapod tripod, I just move the legs towards me and hold it vertically, and I have been practicing with that, but would you still recommend a stabilizer?

        • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by AvatarKasai.
    • #72002404
      Avatarpaulears
      Participant

      You’re joking? Yes? That is a device to hold a camera stable and still. It does it pretty well. It’s not really a tripod in the usual sense. Proper tripods have stability from strength and weight. If you pick up a camera mounted on a weight tripod, then the weight and inertia resist the changes in angle of the camera – something steadicam devices took to the edge. I really can’t see that utility device adding much to stability, that’s pretty much down to you. clearly, it doesn’t work for you as we noticed. However, if you practice, you will get better and it might help a tiny bit. If you google or youtube camera gimbals you’ll see tons of devices that could help you. I have one for go prop sized cameras and they’re actually pretty good.

      • #72002405
        AvatarKasai
        Participant

        Well, before we go assuming things, I didn’t have that tripod at the time. I just got it a couple months ago, but I didn’t use any stabilizer or tripod at the time of making the video. You don’t know if it’ll work for ME or not.

    • #72002412
      Avatarbobspez
      Participant

      I always shoot with a tripod. It’s the only way to get a steady and level shot every time. Glidecams and such are also available for moving shots.

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