Use old gear or buy new

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    • #72037185
      Avatarfreelife2g
      Participant

      Had to shut things down for quite a while but I’m getting back in the game now. I want to shoot footage for a documentary and a podcast. Will be filming lots of interviews and some other random footage. I still have two mini dv cams and footage that I shot on MiniDV tape about 5 plus years ago. So now what do I do? Keep shooting mini dv? Buy a 4k cam and a new iPhone? All of the above? Can I use my old footage? Do I have to upgrade to 4k or is there a step in between worth taking? I’m open to all comments and suggestions.

    • #72037356
      AvatarJackWolcott
      Participant

      You can certainly continue using your MiniDV camera. It puts out a good image and makes little demand on your computer. However, it will not provide the crisp image quality of an HD or 4K device. You might consider an iPad or iPhone, either of which will give you 4K comparability. Both are commonly used for talking head interviews and podcast video. I prefer the iPad because I like the feel of the larger device. Tripod mounts are available for either if you don’t want to go hand-held. Be sure to shoot in the landscape mode rather than portrait as the latter will cause you fits when you try to edit it.

      If you decide to purchase a camera there is no need, in my opinion, to spend money to get 4K capability. HD will give you excellent image quality at lower cost and will place considerably less strain on your editing computer. True, you can crop 4K to a great extent, recomposing your images in post, but there’s probably no other reason to us this format unless for large screen distribution.

    • #72037368
      Avatarfreelife2g
      Participant

      Thanks for your input. Let’s say on a scale of 1 to 10, footage recorded in 4k is a 10. What would you rate footage recorded on an HD cam and a mini dv cam ? Any suggestions for an HD cam?

    • #72037369
      Avatarfreelife2g
      Participant

      Also, one reason I was thinking about getting a new iPhone and the least expensive 4k cam I can afford is because I assume it won’t be long before it’s the standard.. if it isn’t already. Trying to figure how long do I have. Any thoughts? And Can you Tell me more about 4k and large screen distribution?

    • #72037493
      Avatarbobspez
      Participant

      For youtube and podcasts Full HD (1920×1080) is fine. Most people are watching on 2K screens whether on computers or on their TVs. Movie theaters mostly project movies in 2K (approximately 1920×1080). Even though 4K looks sharper than 2K on a 2k screen, the difference is pretty minimal. If 4K is a 10, then 2K would be about an 8.5 in my opinion. Mini DV (720×480) more like a 5. Despite all of this, if you want your documentary to be aired on Netflix, the cheapest camera you can film it on is the Black Magic Ursa Mini 4.6K. You can buy it at B&H (camera body only) for $3,000. But above all, realize content is king. People watch interesting content on Youtube in all resolutions, including SD (640×480). Lousy content created with the best cameras and cinematograhers is worthless.

    • #72037387
      AvatarJackWolcott
      Participant

      You might take a look at https://www.lifewire.com/4k-resolution-overview-and-perspective-1846842 for an interesting discussion of 4K acquisition and distribution.

      If you rate 4K as 10 I’d rate HD (1080) as 7, MiniDV as 4. That’s on the basis of image sharpness. As I’ve suggested before, to edit 4K you’re going to need a high-powered computer. You don’t mention how you plan on distributing your “documentary.” If it’s to be projected or shown on large-screen TV sets, 4K has some advantages.

      I admit to my prejudice: I don’t need to see the individual hairs on a mouse if I’m watching a documentary on rodent infestations; or individual blades of grass on the football field. I’m much more interested in content than on ultra high resolution shots of minutia. For now, HD provides a satisfying image for me. Perhaps in time I’ll change my mind.

    • #72037606
      Avatarfreelife2g
      Participant

      I appreciate y’all giving me input and info. In my wildest dreams my project would make it to Netflix. But considering I’m a nobody without a crew or a budget, I would consider it a success if I distributed it on YouTube or social media, and got enough views to show that the people thought it was good. I would love to know what the benchmark numbers are, but starting from zero, I’m humbled by the experience alone.

    • #72037709
      Avatarbobspez
      Participant

      I tried to comment twice yesterday but my comments never showed up until today, see it below. The gist of my comment was that I use a Nikon coolpix B700 and a lumix FZ80 to shoot 4K video, both cameras are about $300 used on ebay. The advantage not mentioned about shooting 4K is you can zoom into the frame in an editor like Premiere Pro without loss of resolution. You can’t do that to any great extent shooting in 1080P. Regarding youtube, you get what you get. I have been posting videos for about 9 years on youtube. Some videos have less than a hundred views, some have thousands. It mainly depends on content. But I’m not sure how much it really matters. I don’t monetize my videos but if I did, it would only amount to pennies.

      • This reply was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Avatarbobspez.
    • #72037607
      Avatarbobspez
      Participant

      Freelife2g They say a picture is worth a thousand words. One of the things not mentioned is the ability to zoom into 4K footage and still have a sharp image. 1080P is seriously limited in this regard. Here is a video shot on the right side in 4K and on the left side in 2K. Both sequences were zoomed in in Premiere Pro. On youtube it is displayed in 4K (if not, set the resolution gear on the bottom of the youtube frame to 4K). The camera used on the 4K side (the keyboard player on the right) is the Nikon Coolpix B700, which I bought used on ebay for $300. The left side of the video was shot on a Nikon B5000 in 1080P. I also bought a Lumix FZ80 ($230 used on ebay) with the idea of putting both cameras on a tripod setting one for a medium shot and the other for closeup to use when shooting another video. These cameras have a fixed lens, wide angle to super closeup, can be used in auto or manual settings, and have continuous quiet autofocus. They shoot 4K segments up to 8 minutes in length. I personally have no need for any individual takes longer than that.

    • #72037897
      Avatarfreelife2g
      Participant

      Just out of curiosity, how long do you guys think 4k will be “the standard” at least for indie film projects? I barely have money for cheap 4k cam so anything higher than that is out of the question. But it’s interesting to see how fast things move.

    • #72037883
      Avatarwinterschlaf34
      Participant

      hi, guys

      I have some strange questions about my new laptop battery here. I know that two measures that used to state the power rating of a laptop battery is capacity and voltage, but i don’t know the whr. I found the 60WH printed on my battery, and i wonder How long is 60WH last? Is that a 6 hour battery?? the battery detail:http://www.laptop-akkus.com/apple-a1175.html, but i can’t find anything related to the whr on this product. What is the WHr stand for indeed? how long will these lithium ion batteries hold a charge. Does the bigger number mean the longer run time, thanks very much!!!

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