"Inspire or Retire"

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    • #72004258
      AvatarJay
      Participant

      As a father and business owner, it would be irresponsible of me to move to a distant island to live out my days. I cut my teeth in the industry in the 90’s and early 2000’s.
      In the 90s & 2ks we were using film. Just putting feelers out. With you tube, drones, hand held devices etc, I am like a kid in the candy store. However, I do not know where to begin. I would love to get some advice from those of you that are working. Do we start with wedding videos and build a client base from there? The desire to tell stories and inspire never leaves you. Thank you.

      JR-

    • #72004269
      AvatarJackWolcott
      Participant

      Are you asking with the idea of starting a business you can live on or do you merely want to do some casual shooting and editing? Makes a big difference.

      In the ’90s and early 2000s, weddings were a hot ticket item, something new and highly desirable. They were — and remain — a very high-stress business but the rewards could be worth the hassle. Today, from what I see, the stress level remains high but the rewards are much lower. Perhaps even more importantly, I’ve never seen any indication that shooting weddings leads to building a client base. In most cases its shoot the wedding, hand over the DVD and never see the client again. We stopped shooting weddings about three years after we opened our business.

      In 1998 we formed an association of event (mostly wedding) videographers in our city. Within a couple of years we had 18 member companies. Today only two are still in business and only one of these continues to produce wedding videos.

      I recently attended a wedding at which there was no videographer. At any given time, however, there were five to ten cell phones taking video. The highlights of the wedding were on-line — Facebook and YouTube — before the reception started. This would be your competition.

      If I were in your shoes I would do a great deal of market research before embarking on a video business. What video needs in your community aren’t being met? This is the niche you’ll need to find to succeed.

      What kind of competition will you face? How will you promote your business? What would be a realistic projection of income for the first couple of years? Projection of expenses? Do you have enough reserve to operate the first year or two at break-even or at a loss? Will you work from your home or rent space?

      Knowing what I do after 20 years in the industry, if someone came to me today and said “Lets start a video company” I would flee to the island on the first flight available. But I’d take my camera with me!

      Good luck.

    • #72004290

      Jay,

      What are you passionate about? I’m not passionate about weddings and that is why I don’t film them. I love working on TV commercials and corporate video. And that is what I do and because I love it it makes it easier to work the crazy long days when needed. You can defiantly make money filming weddings. Take a look at this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3Il1A_-vwI This is a success story with tips on someone who started filming weddings 2 years ago and now she films 80 weddings a year. Best of luck.

      Utah Video Production

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