That, my friend, is a HUGE

#166505
AvatarEarlC
Member

That, my friend, is a HUGE topic and I am certain that in order to get all the info you need for its approach it would require more than would be allowed in this space for responses.

That being said: your budget would be of primary importance and would determine what direction you’d take, how far you could go, and the overall quality and perceived value of your product to your intended client base – presumably the players, coaches, school athletic departments and the parents. Assuming, of course, you are referring to highschool football and not college or professional. The last two pretty much have access to all the equipment, production and experienced producers they need IMHO.

From personal experience with HS football I can say you will likely discover that unless you have a solid IN with an abundance of schools, or districts, you are not likely to get the level of response needed to fund your acquisition/editing investment. So, unless you do have an insider advantage, or are willing to work virtually for free, you will simply be doing something you love or enjoy, and not making money, recouping costs or experiencing a profit. Promise!

There is a serious commitment of time required to cover game schedules, and if you do cover multiple schools you are going to be stretched thin unless you can establish a solid resource base for other shooters/editors. You could, of course, cover only one school, each of its seasonal games, and do a GREAT job for that one school, but hardly the thing for establishing renewable business beyond the one. Sadly, that will not address the profit/income elements mentioned above.

Keep in mind the hours that will be required to get to the games, shoot the games, digitize or ingest your footage of the games, produce the various requested producitons of the games – highlights for individual players, game reels for the coaching staff, end-of-season video yearbook for distribution during the awards banquet, and perhaps even a gig for projecting the highlights video at the event. When you calculate the number of hours for all this you will realize that the income per hour required to make it economically feasible will seem totally out of reach. Even $50 per hour will not come close to covering your production costs.

Camera? There are a good many that will do the job, starting with used standard definition units that still have a lot of life left in them. Perhaps the Canon XL1 series, or XL2, the Canon GL2; and a number of models from the Sony, JVC or Panasonic divisions that are similarly priced. You should desire to get something with good optics (read reviews, google for information), steadyshot or other non-digital devices for helping keep your shots smoother, manual focus, white balance and iris controls, solid focusing capabilities (something the Canons do not always hit the bullseye with). Audio may not be all that important for the game per se, but you will need quality audio for comments, interviews, stats, etc.

Then, there’s editing. The editing systems and platforms are huge as well, and each one has its strengths as well as limitations. You’ll need something that compliments your acquisition medium (tape, hard drive, DVD, SDHC card) and format – HDV, HD, etc. There are a bounty of others to pick from, and what you decide upon will reflect directly on your editing platform needs. You need something that will allow you to develop graphics that sports people are accustomed to seeing when you want to reflect stats, game results boards, etc.

As a newbie you are looking at educating yourself, deciding on where you want to go with your desire to shoot football games and player documentaries business-wise, your personal commitment to the whole process, learning to shoot and edit in a professional manner while keeping focus on your need to recoup investment costs, build your business base, and establish yourself as a “go to” person for such productions. Production value, perceived or real, will be a strong element for support of your success.

Good luck with your dream and passion. In spite of the obstacles and negatives, the costs and challenges mentioned in this response, I am a SOLID proponent for “just do it!”

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