mtnbkr28 Wrote:If I had to

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mtnbkr28 Wrote:

If I had to choose either low light or zoom, I think I would go with the low light, thus getting the sony. But I was thinking, if I get Canon, I’ll save some money and with that money I could buy a light. Would this be a good comparison to the sony in low light? I mean will the light work when I’m outdoors shooting someone snowboarding at night? Or any sport like skateboarding and biking at night? I’m thinking this might be the best way to get both things I want and at the most cost effeective way. Is this a good Idea?

Just remember, lights eat batteries. Night skiing/boarding would work pretty good with my sony, but only when your around the light polls. If you try to video as they pass into the dimmer areas between light polls, you might have a bit of trouble. That is where your idea of a light would come in handy.

One of the things you should really concider is a thermal blanket or cover for your camera. The cold will freeze up your lense. It froze mine a few times and the condensation issues can not be ignored either. When it was time for me to go in to warm up, I usually left my camera fully covered and insulated best I could so that it wouldn’t warm up to much. Try to keep the camera just above freezing and don’t let it warm up to room temp. until your done shooting. If it is well below freezing, the cold temp are going to be a problem… :'(

I know that you didn’t ask about this, but for shooting while skiing, try using what I call a dog’s view camera holder. I’ll try to find the link to the site that sells them. They hold the camera down by the snow (like a dog’s view), and it gives you a really neat footage of the speed of the snow going by.

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