James, Wow, you’re about a

#195172
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James,

Wow, you’re about as ‘fresh out the box’ as they come! Right off I have to
tell you there’s a lot to making instructional videos or videos at all. Despite
your newness to it all, I can say it’s not impossible to do. Right now, you’ve
got much bigger issues than just ‘what camera to buy’. You say ‘you want a
professional look’ but it’s not your camera that’s going to make that happen.
In the hands of someone with some training and experience, a ‘crap’ camera can
produce some good if not great results depending on the user.

Videos of all types depend on a lot of factors to get completed and be
‘viewable’ (meaning being watchable without wanting to scream.) Camera quality
does count, but use of lighting, sound and editing the final product are just as critical. You have a potential plan of action, but none of the tools or knowledge to currently pull it off. If you want to make something that’s marketable beyond a ‘YouTube Special’, you’ve only got two options:

Option 1 – Link up with a professional.

This is a viable option in that the pro will already have the gear and know-how to get your project going. Your main role will be as a producer who will supply funding, talent and or resources to get the project made. You’ll collaborate with the pro on writing the training materials for the video format and in the process learn the technical side of production. That will be of great assistance when it comes time to make follow-up videos. You’ll either have to pay the pro outright or cut a deal for monies on the back-end depending on how enthusiastic the pro you negotiate with is about your project’s potential.

Option 2: Do it all yourself. The much, much harder ‘row to hoe’, but not impossible to do. Before you spend a dime on camera gear, use as many free resources to learn how training videos are made. Contrary to what people try to make you think on the ‘Tube’, good training videos take time and effort to plan, write, produce and edit. Then there’s that whole nasty ‘Distribution’ thing to deal with once you’ve got the work done! Check out the many free video tutorials and forums on making training videos here at VM. Then start digging through the mountains of material on the subject posted throughout the web. Do your research first before spending any money!

Now, don’t think that I’m trying to discourage you from your dream. What I am doing is trying to spare you the fate of millions who came before you. Those who with glistening eyes filled with enthusiasm ran out to Best Buy and the late Circuit City and spent their hard-earned money only to fall terribly short of their goals. The vast majority of those who’ve failed, did not take the time to really put eyeballs on what it really takes to do this stuff beyond the hobby stage. Just like it’s nearly impossible to become a pro-ball player with no training or skill, it’s the same with getting into video.

However, armed with good info and a better understanding of the basic process it’s highly probable you can achieve your goal of making piano training videos. Don’t be hard-headed and jump into the shark tank without at least knowing how to swim!

Good luck!

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