I’m actually surprised tha

#175673
AvatarAnonymous
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I’m actually surprised that there’s a program out there that doesn’t allow you to capture both separately. Both Vegas 6 and Premiere Pro 2 do this, and I’m pretty sure I’ve seen it everywhere. Now, most programs will record both channels onto one track, but the track itself should be stereo, and should have a left and right channel within the track that are separate and unique. If you don’t have that, look at your project settings, and check to see if there’s a stereo or mono option, and go with stereo.

Inside the program, there are several ways to isolate your individual channels. In Premiere pro, if I want a quick and dirty separation, I make two copies of my stereo track. On the first track, I grab the audio effects tool "fill left" and drag it in, thus filling both stereo channels with what’s on the left channel. I use the fill right option on the other track, and all of a sudden, I have two separate tracks, one for the left channel, and one for the right.

Sony Vegas is even easier than that, letting you select one channel of the track in a right click menu option. Same thing, duplicate the track, right click on one and select left channel, right channel the other and you’re golden.

You can also output the audio to a separate file, and use a program like the very free, very powerful Audacity, and divide your track into two like that. This is more work, but it can be a better end result, since it will literally be two separate files.

I have NO IDEA how your software works, but I’d almost bet dollars to donuts that it’s got to be preserving the stereo track, or there has to be an option to do so. It would be a pretty ueless program otherwise.

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