I understand and feel the

#171632
AvatarCoreece
Participant

I understand and feel the same way, but I just keep remembering that I was hired to be their and do a good job. Most of those people are just shy and fear being put on the spot, but they still understand that the bride and groom want you to be there to document their special day. They’ll get over it and sometimes after a few drinks those same people get very courageous in front of that camera…sometimes to the point of embarrassment (which is what they were trying to avoid in the first place.)

I would keep from shooting large quantities of general dancing. Many people just want to let loose on the dance floor and feel awkward if the camera is always rolling. I just wait for them to get relaxed and start taping when they really get going. Most of the time they forget or don’t even notice that I’m there.

I also never shoot while people are eating…It’s pointless, boring and irritating. If anything, I will just get a couple of pans of the hall from a distance.

When I shoot the guests at the table, I keep it very brief. Most people wave "hi" or say "congratulations" to the bride and groom. If they are shy and unresponsive, I just wave hi and say congratulations! or cheers! and they get the point and follow suit.

If I’m doing interviews, I usually have the DJ announce a designated spot for those interviews. That way I’m not bothering those that could careless about an interview, plus it gives people a chance to think about something good to say. However, it is sometimes necessary to find recruits, or wait at the exit door and ask people for an interview as they are leaving.

I suppose I could be of more help if you could explain the situation when those people became irratated.

Regardless, as I said before, they’ll get over it and you’ll never seen them again. Just be happy you did what you were hired to do. It’s kinda like when there is construction and traffic is backed up, people get irratated but understand it’s necessary. If they are to obtuse to understand that, it makes it that much easier to shrug them off and move on to something more entertaining.

Best Regards,

Corey

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