I hear what your saying. I’ve

#208508
AvatarJoseph
Participant

I hear what your saying. I've got a T3i, which has the same image sensor as the 60D and the 7d. People think a more expensive camera equals better end product. But that's not it at all. It's how you shoot your video and how you deal with it in post.

 

I recently worked as 2nd camera on a short film that used a RED as thier primary camera. I asked the director and DP how my stuff compared and they said it was really good. No problem cutting the two together.

 

I do have to say that I do shoot in 1080, though. Not that you're ever going to tell on a computer screen… or really hardly any screen for that matter. But it does allow me to reframe in post if needed, or add a zoom, pan, etc, without dropping under 720. But yeah… that's the only real reason you NEED to shoot 1080.

 

Here's a fun calculator you might show clients to put things in perspective.

 

http://myhometheater.homestead.com/viewingdistancecalculator.html

 

It shows that for the 40" 1080p TV that I have, I have to be 5.3 feet from the screen to take advantage of the higher resolution due to the limitations of the human eye (visual acuity.) Since my eyes are 9' away from my TV while sitting on my couch (and my eyes aren't quite 20/20 anymore) it really doesn't matter whether I'm watching 1080 or 720. Most television is broadcast in 720 anyway since it requies less bandwidth.

 

Contrast is a far more important factor than resolution. Just compare an old LCD projector to a new DLP projector at the same resolution and you'll see a massive picture improvement in the DLP with higher contrast.

 

If the end product is only going online, then there's even less reason to shoot in 1080. Ask them how often they sit at a 1080p screen and watch streamed video at 1080 and if they do, how often it freezes, drops frames or loses synch with the audio. I watch most stuff online at 720 or 480 because it plays smoother and looks just as good.

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