I have been using Audio

#213031
AvatarSpace Racer
Participant

I have been using Audio Technica AT3350s for the past two or three years and they’re good and cheap. Its not so much the brand of microphone you buy as how close you can get it to the person’s mouth that makes the difference; aim for the second button down from the top on the subject’s shirt.
The other thing that will make your interviews better is plenty of light, and using a three-point lighting setup. If you can only afford one light, get a backlight to separate your subjects from the background.
That said, video cameras do better with LOTS of light so if you can shoot outdoors under one of those white shade awnings or very close to big windows with sheer curtains, that would be ideal. Or you can be like Curtis Judd on YouTube and use a bunch of clamplights to shape everything. Don’t forget to custom white balance with a Kodak gray card.

I have no opinions on camcorders—you can do just as well with an iPhone6—they all seem to be fine nowadays, but look for one with two microphone inputs, or you can use a 2-into-1 headphone jack.
But don’t try to do it on your own using internet research: go to a real bricks and mortar store and have them put together a microphone-camcorder combination that they can demonstrate to you will work together. That’s what the salesmen are paid for—good advice. You’ll pay a little more, but trust me, you’ll save a lot of time doing it that way versus trying to figure it out yourself.

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