Hi Robyne.The GL-2 and t

#178618
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Hi Robyne.

The GL-2 and the VX-2100 will both basically produce "broadcast quality" SD video. I’ve put a few comercials on the air for clients, and there’s just the tiniest differece in quality from mine versus the guys with super expensive cameras. So in short, "Yes" the quality is good enough to make and distribute DVD’s. If it weren’t we wouldn’t use it for event videography.

On the Canon end, the GL-2 does have some neat features you can’t get on the VX-2100, and it’s cheaper. You’d want to have lighting if you bought this camera, but you should really have that eithr way if you’re producing a video on a set (and a kitchen is a set). Don’t rely on home lighting for a video you expect to sell. You will be let down!

High Def is nifty, and if you can afford it, you’ll be five years ahead of everyone out there. Plus, video shot in HD will look very clear and crisp converted to SD, whereas SD can’t go High def and maintain much clarity.

In the here and now though, there are problems with high definition, in my opinion. First, there’s not a Standard format for watching High Def videos. It might look like Blu-Ray will win the market right now, but Betamax looked like it would win the market in the 80’s, and who owns a betamax player today? With The HDDVD format still butting heads with blu-ray, there’s a lot of potential that you could invest lots of money in equipment that’ll be useless in five years, wheras there will still be a lot of SD TV’s out there for a long time to come yet, and even HD TV’s can deal with SD fine.

Plus, how many people do you know who own a high def player right now, either Blu-ray or HDDVD? I can count everyone I know on one hand and have 5 fingers left to spare. If you released a High def disc today, you would have virtually no market to sell your product to, and the insane cost to produce a single high def disc (over $30) would prevent you from making profits on a highly competative market. When you’ve got competition like Alton Brown and the food network, you need to make it easy for people to get your disc.

You might want to look into a high def camera, and produce SD video with it. That would be better than expecting people to upgrade their DVD players to accomadate the video. But then, cameras only have a life span of a few years before they’re really either obsolete or broken, so if it takes more than a couple years for the High def market to take off (which I see as very probable) you might have wasted money on high def that you didn’t need during that camera’s life.

Weigh your needs and get what best suits you. If you’re willing to stick around SD, the GL-2 or VX-2100 are both fine cameras.

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