Hey Spencer,I think you’

#164506
AvatarTomScratch
Participant

Hey Spencer,

I think you’re kiddin about how hard it is to combine pan and zoom shot. This is one of my most used shots. If I’m in a close-up or medium mode during a band, conference, inaugural ball or comparable shoot, doing a shot of several or more people, this is what I do to get from A to B. As I zoom out (going to wide) the camera is headed over to the another part of the bandstand or the room (i.e., panning), and as I close in on my destination, I am zooming in (going to tele) to frame. Without the zoom out combined with the pan, I don’t know precisely where I’m ending up and "precise" is ultra important, so I don’t have an ajustment glitch at the end of the pan/zoom. The said shot, zoomout plus pan plus zoomin in a combined flowing motion is typically one to four seconds. The zoom out makes the pan easier on the eye. Generally, the zoom portion is made very subtle and in effect masked by the panning action; a mutual benefit for zoom and pan you might say.

I agree with your shot recommendation for the end of the catwalk position. Seems like both zooming and panning would not be overactive from from that angle, looking down the long runway, like looking into a pipe.

The camera move I describe in my post above (tele to wide to tele to wide to model walking out of frame), all the while panning with the movement of the model is more complicated than the basic abc zoom plus pan shot. This one will take a little practice, such as chasing cars with the cam as they pass by.

Re being six feet away at the end of the catwalk. The thing about this is that you may have 30 people between you and the catwalk. The view of models below the knee will be blocked or have heads bobbing in there. Unless focus is an issue (being too close to focus; won’t happen of course with a wide angle lens), personally I would want to be smooshed against the catwalk with my cam, beanie declaring MP (Member of Press). X-D

REGARDS … TOM 8)

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