A wireless mic’s hardware/

#202872
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A wireless mic’s hardware/components determine what frequency range it is able to utilize. Because of that limitation a particular transmitter/receiver may only be able to cover part of the available UHF band, so that is why you can buy essentially identical wireless systems only with different freq capabilities. It doesn’t fundamentally effect how they work or the quality of the sound.

The reason you might want to choose one frequency range over another depends on your use circumstance, including number of mics needed at one time, location (i.e. urban city vs. rural suburb), RF congestion (other RF equipment or neighboring venues, etc.), and TV broadcasting. For instance, if you know you need a certain number of working channels, and you know frequency channels that are already being used by surrounding equipment and/or TV stations, that might give you a better idea of which frequency range would give you the most flexibility and available channels in your specific location. If you only need a few channels and you’re not in a heavily congested area, either range will probably be fine.

If you’re getting multiple wireless systems it’s usually better to get them in the same freq range, that way all of your transmitters and receivers will all work together interchangeably. Remember each frequency range can support many individual channels/signals, you don’t need models with different ranges to use more than one at a time. Each pair will simply be set to a different specific frequency within the available range. Usually it says on the product spec sheet how many channels the range/bandwidth can theoretically support.

I can’t comment on the included lavs as I haven’t used the particular system you’re looking at.

Hope this helps

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