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What type of camera for a video like this one?

Home Forums General Video and Film Discussion What type of camera for a video like this one?

This topic contains 1 reply, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  paulears 8 months ago.

  • Author
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  • #52546

    paolog
    Member

    Hello,

     

    i found this video on the web and i really love the way it looks

     

    http://webvideouniversity.com/camtasia8/

     

    i wonder what type of camera this guy used. Can you help me?

     

    The thing that i love the most is the blurred background.

     

    How can i achieve it?

     

    Thanks

     

    PaoloG

  • #205350

    paulears
    Participant

    probably a DSLR which make a feature of shallow depth of field, or a conventional video camera further away, zoomed in, with the aperture open as wide as possible. Other than the shallow DoF, I don't see much else – although I have a suspicion that there could have been some straightforward greenscreen keying used. What did you see that tweaked your curiosity?

  • #205351

    JKnight
    Member

    The camera used in that video is most likely either a Canon 60D, DSLR, or a Sony A65. DSLR cameras have large image sensors with high megapixel resolution, a 1000$ dslr will have a pas-c sized sensor, probably used on this video, a full frame dslr has a image sensor the size of 35mm film such as the canon 5D mrk III, full frames cost about $3000, then you go up to full frame 2k and 4k and now 6k cameras, the red epic, in which the avengers was shot with, has 6k full frame sensor now

     

    here is a video shot with the 5D mark II full frame DSLR

     

  • #205352

    paolog
    Member

    Thanks guys,

     

    i suspected he used a DLSR, and the Canon EOS 60D is the one he suggest in a course of his.

     

    the thing that i like the most is the blurred background.

     

    So what type of lens would give this effect with the EOS 60D?

     

    a 35mm?

     

    sorry for these types of questions, but i am a newbie 🙂

     

    Thanks

     

    PaoloG

  • #205356

    jroush
    Participant

    I would have to ssay it looks like a green screen had been used. The footage was probably taken with a dslr though.

  • #205411

    Jordan
    Participant

    Paolo,

     

    You don't necessarily need a green screen. The easiest way to achieve that effect is to take your DSLR (if you have one), and zoom in anywhere between 55 and 300mm. Then create space between the camera and your subject, and between the subject and background.

     

    Let us know how it turns out!

     

     

     

  • #205413

    gldnears
    Member

    " You don't necessarily need a green screen. The easiest way to achieve that effect is to take your DSLR (if you have one), and zoom in anywhere between 55 and 300mm. "

     

     

    You can do the same with a camcorder ( ugh ! ) also. While yer at it, why not shoot in monochrome for a REALLY classy, artsy look!

     

  • #205415

    paolog
    Member

    thank you guys….

  • #205486

    artsmith
    Participant

     It's about apparent depth-of-field mainly. Field depth, (that is the amount of a shot's 'depth' which is in acceptably, critically if you like, sharp focus), is usually a function of the focal length of the lens used, whether prime lenses, or part of the range of a zoom. Because depth-of-field is shallowest at the more extreme 'telephoto' end of the scale it usually pays to back off a bit and re-frame your shot so as to register it in the way you wished, by using telephoto, instead of going too close. Some camcorders, sadly, allow this only to a limited extent. On the other hand, ultra-close is another way of achieving limited field-depth.

     

     There is a bonus to that, as well, as it is possible to create a powerful '3D' illusion, by isolating something in critically sharp focus, against a background which is just a tad 'off' providing your camcorder has the 'critical-sharpness' firepower. The other way, if you have the control, is to adjust your camcorder's dynamics, in any of a number of ways which will cause the lens's diaphragm to open-up a bit, which also reduces depth-of-field. An easy way, without having to modify your camcorder's settings, is to screw-on a neutral-density filter which accomplishes the same thing. Again, low lighting will bring about the same effects, but insufficient light will tend to will raise noise-levels.

     

     At the end of the day, it's a whole heap of 'trade-offs'. Having always been a fan of carrying a battery of lenses, I have been pleasantly surprised what my camcorder (a 'Panasonic' HDC-SD900), is capable of doing, without 'supplementaries' or filters, just by having a damned good lens, and image processing  to make the most of it. 

     

     Ian Smith

     Dunedin , New Zealand.

  • #205488

    trusso
    Participant

    Normally, I would say this is shot with a DSLR because of the depth of field. However, it looks obvious to me that it is green screened footage. The backgrounds do not look like they are quite disconnected from the talent. That said, this could be done quite easily using any camcorder on a green screen and then taking a background set and blurring it in your editing software. It gives the same result.

  • #205491

    toplinecomms
    Member

    Hi Paolo,

     

    As others have already said, I think the shallow depth of field you are seeing has been added in during post with he use of a green screen. If you wanted to recreate this look though, I would suggest a DSLR with a very fast lens. If you can get a prime lens with a maximum aperture of F2 or even quicker, this should give you a very shallow depth of field. A good cost effective option are the Olympus Zuiko lenses. You could use something like a 50mm F1.4 and then reposition your camera to aquire your desired framing. As long as there is some distance between your subject and the backdrop, you will achieve the blurred look.

     

    Depending on the camera you choose, you may need to purchase a lens adaptor to make the Olympus Zuiko range fit. These are very cheap though. I myself use a 1.4 50mm with a Canon 5D and a Panasonic AF101. Both require different lens adaptors, but the results are very impressive.

     

    Jamie Field

    Head of Production

    http://www.toplinecomms.com

     

  • #205532

    Tom
    Participant

    I don't like the look, and you shouldn't either. It looks too "green screen-y" to me. Any decent DSLR or 3 chip camcorder could have shot the foreground, and the backgrounds look like stock footage. I believe that more time should have been spent creating better, more realistic backgrounds with  better diminishing focus than those used here. A little movement in the background helps to sell the shot. This video has static backgrounds, a giveaway. Also she looks way too "crisp" compared to the backgrounds. I'd soften her shot a bunch, just for openers. (turn detail way, way down.) The foreground and backgrounds just don't look like they were shot with the same gear on same day. 

     

    The shots are well exposed and framed, but they just don't match. BTW, I was doing blue and green screening decades ago with Grass Valley and Ultimatte gear. We'd spend a day or two lighting the foreground just to match the backgrounds. Tedious, and expensive. 

     

    However, today, it's quick, and cheap. This video looks it. The ideal green screen should totally fool the audience. In reading the comments, it didn't seem to fool anybody. 

     

    Sorry to sound so grumpy. Time to go home. It's been a long week. 

     

    Cheers!!

  • #205536

    Anonymous

    [quote=paolog]

    Hello,

     

    i found this video on the web and i really love the way it looks

     

    http://webvideouniversity.com/camtasia8/

     

    i wonder what type of camera this guy used. Can you help me?

     

    The thing that i love the most is the blurred background.

     

    How can i achieve it?

     

    Thanks

     

    PaoloG

    [/quote]

     

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  • #205404

    paolog
    Member

    [quote=jroush]

    I would have to ssay it looks like a green screen had been used. The footage was probably taken with a dslr though.

    [/quote]

     

    ok,

     

    do you think it is possible to get the same effect without green screen?

     

    If yes, what would you use….? please be specific… 🙂

     

    Thanks

     

    PaoloG

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