What price to ask for this project?

Moonlife's picture
Last seen: 5 days 21 hours ago
Joined: 02/11/2018 - 1:53pm

Hi there,

I'm new to this forum and to filming as well. I made a few recaps for Headhunterz (dj) and one commercial video for my aunts company. Before making video's I was only into photography. Now, someone asked me to do this project. He makes music studio's and he likes me to make a video for every studio he made plus a promo video. He also wants me to interview the artists, take my own camera, light (one lamp) and recorder.

This is a total of 10 video's plus approximately 56 photo's. All the video's have to be very short, about a 1,5 minute or so. 

I'm really not sure what to ask for such a project.. 

Can anyone help me?

Thanks!


Jack Wolcott's picture
Last seen: 15 hours 4 min ago
Joined: 01/02/2008 - 11:51pm
Plus Member

The key to billing for this is time: how much time will it take you to travel to and from each site, to shoot the necessary footage, interview artists, take the still shots and finally, to edit, review and deliver the material. You'll have to estimate this carefully; don't under-estimate in favor of the client and try to come up with an honest estimate of how much time it will take. Then add 10-20% to be on the safe side.

Now decide how much your time and talent is worth and multiply that by the number of hours involved. Minimum wage is $13-15 per hour, depending on where in the U.S. you live. With your skills you're certainly worth twice that aren't you? Three times that wouldn't be asking too much at all. To put it in perspective, my company would charge $100 per hour with a four hour minimum for each day involved.

The best advice I can give you is to have a contract that spells out exactly what you are going to do for this client, how much it will cost and the terms for payment. Under no circumstances hand over any material until you have money in hand. Jobs like this have a way of going South: they sound like a great idea to a client at first, then become less and less important as the realities of completing them becomes evident. You don't want to be left having done a great deal of work and no payment for it and a well written contract will protect your inventment of time and talent.


johndop's picture
Last seen: 4 days 22 hours ago
Joined: 02/12/2018 - 12:17pm

Completely agree with Jacks suggestions. You can't sell yourself short, and charging minimum wage damages the industry. Factor in computing costs as well, do you have enough space to back up all your footage? How long will you keep copies of the footage for?

John MacDonald

www.johndop.com

Videographer | Lighting Guy


jimmygilmore's picture
Last seen: 22 hours 34 min ago
Joined: 02/16/2018 - 1:04pm

Agree with above but don't forget about audio. Most guys coming into video from photography don't know how to important it is until it's too late. If you can, bring a pro along with quality gear and mark up his time. If you're recording interviews the sound is the most important part.

Jimmy Gilmore
Writer/Producer
https://fluid-films.com