Video Restoration help

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    • #84925

      Hello all,

       

      Five years ago myself and a group of friends made a 30 minute film for a major high school project, the film is tacky and hilariously cheesy (having been made on no budget at all), BUT there is a lot of memory attached to it and so recently I have begun trying to clean it up for the sake of those memories and reminiscing.

       

      Because, at the time, none of us had ever made a video before we had no idea what we were doing in the 'post-production' phase, as a result the video is highly compressed. I have come to understand that this type of compression artefact (as seen in the screen shot below) is known as 'Macroblocking'. What I would like to know is; what is the best way to remove these blocks, I understand that by doing so I may soften the image further but I still want to give it a try.

       

      I have searched the internet high and low for answers but so far I have only found something called 'AviSynth'. Is this program the only way for me to fix the image?

       

      Currently I have a MacBook Pro with Adobe CS5 installed on it (Premier Pro, After Effects, etc.) and I also have Final Cut Pro and Motion. If there is some sort of plug in or other program that works on a Mac that will work then I’d really like to know about it. I'd rather use a program I’m already familiar with then have to learn how to use AviSynth.

      The video file is currently 720X576 pixels large, Progressive Scan and in the .AVI file format.

       

      Thanks in advance for any help!

       

      https://forums.adobe.com/servlet/JiveServlet/downloadImage/2-7160026-724422/900-506/Screenshot.jpg

      Screenshot.jpg

    • #211714
      AvatarTrevor
      Participant

      Sorry to disappoint you, but once the video has been compressed, there is no way to get rid of the digital artifacts of high compression.  Compression physically throws out the information that the computer figures it does not need.  So unless you still have the original raw footage then your footage is at the level that it is going to be its best, and unless you want to do a "Babylon 5 DVD" edit of your video, the. I would leave it the way it is.  And converting it to another format, unless you really need to edit in that format, is a waste of time.  

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