Value of SSD drive

Viewing 16 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #51435
      AvatarBruce
      Participant

      I edit using Premiere Pro CS6 with a Dell XPS-8300 desktop system.  I am upgrading to 16GB Ram this week and am considering upgrading to add a 256GB SSD.  I normally put all files for a project (50-100GB) on an external ESata or USB3 connected drive.  Would you expect me to get a significant boost in speed by putting each new project on the SSD and then to move it off to another drive when the edit is done?

       

      My projects generally are 1 to 3 hour performance events using 2 or 3 cameras and dual system sound.

    • #204589
      Avatargary_hendricks
      Participant

      Hi

       

      Definitely. When you hook up the SSD and work off that, there will be significant boosts in speed. SSD is the best, my Windows now boots up in 5 seconds flat.

    • #204591
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      "  Would you expect me to get a significant boost in speed by putting each new project on the SSD and then to move it off to another drive when the edit is done? "

       

      It depends upon the speed of your connection to the external drive, doesn't it? It seems to me that the bottleneck would be the USB or eSATA connection, not necessarily the speed of the drive . . .

       

      Rick Crampton

    • #204595
      voodeuxvoodeux
      Participant

      Your bottleneck will probably be the interface. If you were using 5400RPM drives previously, you'll notice improved editing performance. Otherwise, probably less than having a dedicated internal drive for the scratch disk. Check the Adobe forums, and seek the wisdom of Haarm Millard, the guru in all things Premiere.

    • #204642
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

       'Magix' Video Editor manuals used to be quite emphatic on one point, eg not to use Solid-state devices to feed footage into rendering processes. I am not sure whether that still applies in the case of USB-3. I do have a 256 gB SSD device in my own computer (Intel I-7 four-core) but it contains the 'system' and some 'programme' files only. So, 'Garytan', my computer boots-up in no-time flat too, but I would prefer a 7200rpm hard-drive to feed into editing/rendering processes. By the way, video-editing is not the most computer-intensive and demanding activity on my computer; real-time play-back of symphonic music is, especially when scored for a full orchestra. Video, generally, is duck-soup by comparison.

       

      Ian Smith

      Dunedin, New Zealand.

    • #302858
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      > "  By the way, video-editing is not the most computer-intensive and demanding activity on my computer; real-time play-back of symphonic music is, especially when scored for a full orchestra. "

       

      Really?! You running at sooper-dooper sample rates and multi-channels, or what?

       

      Rick Crampton

    • #301583
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      > "  By the way, video-editing is not the most computer-intensive and demanding activity on my computer; real-time play-back of symphonic music is, especially when scored for a full orchestra. "

       

      Really?! You running at sooper-dooper sample rates and multi-channels, or what?

       

      Rick Crampton

    • #301913
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      > "  By the way, video-editing is not the most computer-intensive and demanding activity on my computer; real-time play-back of symphonic music is, especially when scored for a full orchestra. "

       

      Really?! You running at sooper-dooper sample rates and multi-channels, or what?

       

      Rick Crampton

    • #302180
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      > "  By the way, video-editing is not the most computer-intensive and demanding activity on my computer; real-time play-back of symphonic music is, especially when scored for a full orchestra. "

       

      Really?! You running at sooper-dooper sample rates and multi-channels, or what?

       

      Rick Crampton

    • #204647
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      > "  By the way, video-editing is not the most computer-intensive and demanding activity on my computer; real-time play-back of symphonic music is, especially when scored for a full orchestra. "

       

      Really?! You running at sooper-dooper sample rates and multi-channels, or what?

       

      Rick Crampton

    • #302704
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      > "  By the way, video-editing is not the most computer-intensive and demanding activity on my computer; real-time play-back of symphonic music is, especially when scored for a full orchestra. "

       

      Really?! You running at sooper-dooper sample rates and multi-channels, or what?

       

      Rick Crampton

    • #301792
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      > "  By the way, video-editing is not the most computer-intensive and demanding activity on my computer; real-time play-back of symphonic music is, especially when scored for a full orchestra. "

       

      Really?! You running at sooper-dooper sample rates and multi-channels, or what?

       

      Rick Crampton

    • #204652
      AvatarSafeHarbor
      Participant

      Do NOT use an SSD for video editing, for boot only.

       

      You can install a single 7200rpm SATA drive internally (or use 2 drives in a RAID 0) or…keep doing what you're doing. Most video cameras today are recording at 25Mbps or less…easily handled by most any decent drive, so I don't see the drive as being a performance issue. Just avoid "Green" drives, which are designed for energy savings and not performance.

       

      Jeff Pulera

      Safe Harbor Computers

    • #205089
      Avatarchannelone
      Participant

      [quote=brucemcintosh]  Would you expect me to get a significant boost in speed by putting each new project on the SSD and then to move it off to another drive when the edit is done?[/quote]

       

      Be forewarned if you are going with SSD’s to back everything up, we bought 4 Panasonic Tough Books to replace our aging Go-Books and within six months 2 of the SSD’s failed.

       

      Wayne  

    • #205132
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

      As it happens 'gldnears', yes, music is highly demanding of resources. I am able to state that clearly, as I do both for my productions rather than add the 'nothing' copyright free music which is available. I also try, where possible to match the music to the action in order to produce 'audible wallpaper' as I call it to enhance the effect without being too intrusive.

       

      I use 'Kontakt 5' and a setup which allows for up to sixteen channels to be reviewed simultaneously. For composition purposes, I put one solo example of each instrument group on each of the sixteen channels, although the strings are actually ensembles, the other instruments, including all 'standard' brass, woodwinds, timpani (representing percussion), and either harp or solo piano. That IS highly demanding of resources and usually voices are 'cut' by the software to reduce overload when that applies.

       

       Once composed, the rest of the process is not so bad, as the instrument groups are able to be recorded one at a time to a  wave-file dedicated to that group. The resulting 'mix' is passed to a DAW, usually in my case 'Reaper', although I do occasionally use others and a final mix-down talks place, of the full symphony orchestra, where applicable, and once reverb. appropriate to a performance venue of 100 cubic metres is added, it sounds pretty bloody good, to my ears, and I certainly haven't had any complaints from anyone else.

       

      By comparison, using an i7 based four-core (eight stream) CPU and top-of-the-line GPU the very occasional dropped frame or two on review, is the worst I get when editing video, usually from 'Cineform Intermediates' in the timeline, to H264.

       

       I might add, that I use 'music-studio' accoustics for all work up to the final mix. A bit of reverb. is needed, because without it, the French horns, Cor Anglais and other instruments sound flat and lifeless. I must continually be careful not to overdo the reverb. as that brings more problems than it solves. In my case, 100 cu.metres turned out to be the ideal, after a fair amount of trial and error.

       

       Does that make things clearer?

       

       Ian Smith

       Dunedin, New Zealand

    • #205158
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

      'It's official'. A few days ago I responded to an item which appeared on the 'Videomaker' site regarding the 'lite' version of Blackmagic Design's 'Da Vinci' resolve in its current version. Such a beast is not generally useful without a fair bit of documentation, by way of support. The advice which accompanied this product dealt, briefly, with the use of SSD drives. Although I use one of these myself as the primary boot-up device for my computer, I would be less enthusiastic about feeding material directly to editing, review or rendering processes from it. The reason is, that the speeds claimed, evidently apply only to non-demanding and lightly-loaded applications. Because  there is a certain amount of internal processing called-for, as I understand it, 'real-world' ratings of half of what is claimed, seem to be more common in more demanding applications. Both video-making and as I stated (somewhat contentiously, it seems), music rendering and mixing, call for computer 'grunt'. 

       

       Full marks then to 'BlackmagicDesign' for providing test software which enables would-be users to assess in advance the performances of their equipment as an indication of what might be reasonably expected in-use. I'm pleased to say that mine rated rather well; which rather begs the question as to why I had persisted with the prehistoric device I had stuck with with for so many years, until comparatively recently. Maybe 'money' had something to do with it!

       

       Ian Smith – Dunedin, New Zealand      

    • #205159
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      Ian sez " Does that make things clearer? ".

       

      I was just curious . . . . I've been recording classical music for over fifty years, obviously mostly in the analog realm; but for the last nine or ten years I've been using Merging Technologies " Pyramix " DAW on a Core 2 Duo 3 gig with XP-Pro. Sixteen tracks with some DSP @ 24/88.2 seems effortless enough. Ah, BUT maybe that's because Pyramix uses a sound card ( Mykerinos ) for the heavy lifting as opposed to being a CPU intensive system. I built a separate computer for video, Core2 Quad @ 3 G, running Win7 Pro, 64 bit, which handles HiDef with CS5 very well.

      One thing fer sure, everyone's experience is different!

       

      Rick Crampton

Viewing 16 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

The best stock video sites — 2021

Stock video sometimes gets a bad wrap in the filmmaking community. In reality, however, we see stock video used every day in any number of applications. Below, you'll find our selections for the best places to look for stock...
homicide-bootstrap