Sony NEX-5T footage is REALLY grainy

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    • #85560
      Avatarsonygirl129
      Participant

      Everytime I film something with my camera, the footage looks super grainy. Specifically, darker colors. Black clothing/items look super grainy and discolored; even the wood floors in my house look grainy. I was just wondering if there's a way to fix that?

    • #212293
      AvatarJackWolcott
      Participant

      Be sure the camera isn't automatically adding gain. Any setting over +6db will almost certainly add graininess to your footage. With my NX5U I keep the gain locked at -3db for most shooting. In very low light I'll bump it up to 0db or possibly +3db, although I try to avoid the latter if possible.

       

       

    • #212297
      Avatarsonygirl129
      Participant

      I'm not very technologically advanced, so what does "+6db" mean? How do I keep the gain low?

    • #212298
      Avatarsonygirl129
      Participant

      Thank you so much, by the way!

    • #212308
      AvatarJackWolcott
      Participant

      Gain is an electronic amplification of the video signal — it makes things look brighter. At 0db there is no gain, no enhancement of the signal. In three db increments, many cameras permit the operator to increase the gain to +18db. Set up like this, the image in your camera will look very grainy, the blacks, especially, will look glazed over and mottled, pretty unattractive.

       

      My camera tends to have a very "hot" (bright) signal, so I actually decrease the sensitivity by setting the gain at -3db. Even in very low light situations I never go above +6db, being willing to sacrifice a little bit of image quality for the opportunity to shoot in less than perfect lighting conditions.

       

      If your camera is in the "auto," as opposed to the "manual" mode, it's quite possible that the camera is adjusting the gain to suit itself, very likely setting the gain much too high for good video in a moderately low-light situation. This is one of many reasons why it's not too good an idea to shoot in "auto" mode. Check your user's manual, though; it may be that you can lock the gain setting even in "auto" mode. If not, learn to shoot in "manual" mode and lock  down the gain to 0db. Experiment with your camera and see what the settings look like and what looks best for the kind of shooting you do.

       

      Good luck.

       

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