Non-linear Video Editing in the 90’s: 1990-1994

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    • #54037
      Avatarspikemtz
      Participant

      Hello, everyone! I'm interested in learning about non-linear video editing in the early 90's. I'm familiar with the Amiga computers and the Video Toaster, but what other systems and software existed? Were people editing with PC and Macintosh computers as well? Were you there? Any information, or stories, would be greatly appreciated! 

    • #206018
      Avatarvideosilva
      Participant

      I was using an Amiga 1000 Hands down the best operationg system to this day. Microsoft is and has always been a copy cat. Microsoft has never had anything inovative just copied and perfected other peoples ideas, concepts. The first movie efffects were done on Amigas along with the Video Toaster. Amiga coined the phrase desktop editing wich is pretty much every thing you do today.

       

      Apple was also big into audio and video but they were 2-3 times more then Amigas plus they did not have the Toaster.

       

      Mind you we were using floppy drive, we did not have the memory nor the hard drive space that is available today.I belive the computer had 1.5 megs of memory and the operating system took up very little memory.

       

      If the Amiga had the hardware of today it would be a SCREAMER !!!

       

      Hope that answers some of your questions. By the way the toaster worked on the Amiga 2000's.

       

      I was doind the same audio video as today only with out the memory nor CD DVD drives. They came a LITTLE later.

    • #206019
      Avatarvideosilva
      Participant

      Microsoft came out with its own GUI YEARS after the Amiga.Micrsoft was DOS based for years.

       

       

      The Amiga was DECADES ahead of its time.

    • #206020
      Avatarvideosilva
      Participant

      The ONLY thing that has evolved since the Amiga is bigger storage faster processers and more memory, nothing more. We already had all that but nearly 30 years ago. It is only logicl that more mermory would become availalable as time progressed.

       

       

      Again computers have not evolved at all in 30 years.

    • #206030
      Avatarspikemtz
      Participant

      Thank you for your reply, videosilva, but I'm afraid that some of your information is incorrect! Apple had it's own GUI in Mac OS in early 1984. Amiga Workbench, and the Amiga 1000, weren't released until some time in 1985. Microsoft also released their first version of Windows in 1985, so Amiga wasn't as far ahead of the game as you may have thought! The Atari ST, also released in 1985 had its own GUI!

       

      On a side note, Dana Carvey's brother, Brad Carvey, an engineer, built the first wire-wrap prototype of the Video Toaster!

    • #206079
      AvatarBrian
      Participant

      I first used AVID Media Composer around 1990 or 91.  It was like editing while watching an old stadium jumbotron.  Forget about knowing if your audio was in sync.  The picture was so heavily pixelated that you could only guess about fine detail.  Still, it was AMAZING to be able to break free of tape decks and start telling stores without the constraints of linear technology.

    • #206233
      Avatarbillmecca
      Participant

      When I started my current job I began with Avid Media Suite Pro, their low end. Came with one 9 gig media drive, Mac quadra 950 and cost $35,000.  Upgraded to Express DV years later, on PC, about $6,000 with a 120 gig Media Drive, and then to MC 3.5 in 09 for about the same price. 

       

      This was a new position, and we looked everywhere, DVision, Imix, Media 100, but wound up with Avid because I had cut some 16mm film and it made the most sense to me.

       

      Fast forward to 2013 and it's time for another upgrade and Probably moving to Adobe CS6 Premium, for the integration and best bang fo the buck vs Avid.

       

      I shoot with a Sony Z7u and I like the immediate back up on MiniDV tape, I ingest ffrom teh CF cards, which can take a while, and since I'm old I harken back to the days of batch capturing from tape, only ingesting what i was going to use, vs, now taking everything in and having to sort it out. No real time saving with a tapeless workflow, but it is what it is.

    • #206234
      Avatarbillmecca
      Participant

      When I started my current job I began with Avid Media Suite Pro, their low end. Came with one 9 gig media drive, Mac quadra 950 and cost $35,000.  Upgraded to Express DV years later, on PC, about $6,000 with a 120 gig Media Drive, and then to MC 3.5 in 09 for about the same price. 

       

      This was a new position, and we looked everywhere, DVision, Imix, Media 100, but wound up with Avid because I had cut some 16mm film and it made the most sense to me.

       

      Fast forward to 2013 and it's time for another upgrade and Probably moving to Adobe CS6 Premium, for the integration and best bang fo the buck vs Avid.

       

      I shoot with a Sony Z7u and I like the immediate back up on MiniDV tape, I ingest ffrom teh CF cards, which can take a while, and since I'm old I harken back to the days of batch capturing from tape, only ingesting what i was going to use, vs, now taking everything in and having to sort it out. No real time saving with a tapeless workflow, but it is what it is.

    • #206236
      Avatarvideosilva
      Participant

      In 1994, as Commodore filed for bankruptcy, Byte magazine called the Amiga 1000 "the first multimedia computer… so far ahead of its time that almost nobody—including Commodore's marketing department—could fully articulate what it was all about".[

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