Lighting

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    • #54507
      George
      Participant

      What type of lighting kit is good for simple interviews? Not willing to spend $$$. Investing in mics, moreso. Thanks!  

       

       

    • #206182
      George
      Participant
    • #206184
      Brian
      Participant

      What's your budget?  

      Simple means a lot of different thing to different folks. Describe your normal interview setup. One camera or two cameras, location, etc. 

       

    • #206192
      George
      Participant

      My budget is pretty 200$, I know its low. The location will be in a church. White-light chandelier above, light from stained glass windows, and a few wall lights. Basically will be setup in the middle, on a chair. 

      Since this will be seperated, and the actual interviews will run less than a minute. No need for double cam, in my case. 

    • #206194
      Brian
      Participant

      Groovy, doing it on a shoestring.  Here's my two cents worth…

       

      As a professional user, my attitude is to buy really good tools that last rather than buying junk.  You can get online and find "professional" light kits for a few hundred, but is that really the best use of your cash?

       

      I've seen gorgeous footage shot with a single source or with natural light and a few reflectors.  With today's cameras, you don't need much light for a good exposure.  The big mistake many folks make is overlighting, shooting in the wrong place or at the right time.  It sounds like you've got a nice space to shoot your stuff.  A stained glass window looks awesome on camera if you pick the right time of day.  Maybe try turning off the overheads and let sunlight shining through the stained glass be your primary light.  Throw a few candles in the background and fill with a lamp.  With a little experimentation, you'll find the mixed color temperatures and light sources can look really nice.  

       

      http://www.homedepot.com/Electrical-Electrical-Tools-Accessories-Work-Lights/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbm8p/R-100354511/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&storeId=10051#.USgS7aVh_Zo

      Simple worklights can also be really, really useful.  Toss some low wattage bulbs in there, and back them away from the talent till the light is soft and diffuse.  If you have to light closer, grab some professional diffusion to soften the worklight.

       

      http://www.rosco.com/technotes/filters/technote4.html#diff

      I just bounced over to your YouTube and see the church interior.  Dude, you're golden with natural light and a tiny bit of fill from a cheep worklight and some diffusion.  Don't have diffusion?  No worries.  On network shoots, I've used fiberglass airconditioner filters, plastic shower curtains, even wax paper.  Just remember if you're using one of these, don't put it directly on your lights since they will burn.

      Save your money and get creative instead of wasting money on disposable so-called  "professional" lights.
       

       

       

    • #206204
      George
      Participant

      Brian, sent you a PM

      Here is the location of my shoot:

       

       

      Shot on Auto, (since I'm related, did not take much time, to do my usual) 60D. Kit lens. All lights were on.

       

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