How to get decent audio dubbing in audio during editing?

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    • #92458
      Avatarjimigunne
      Member

      I am using Vegas Video Pro to produce informational videos for the internet (youtube).
      All I have now for recording audio is a Sure PG 48 (1/4 in. unbalanced) and a USB external Soundblaster SBX Prostudio sound card. When I record my voice-over narration, it sounds TERRIBLE. Its like I am talking from the bottom of a metal trash can. Not so much real echo-ey as very muddled. I can’t believe the acoustics in my small office where my editing PC is located can be so bad. Wish I had a quality microphone to compare. I did try putting a thick piece of foam around the front of mic, forming a sort of tube, hoping that if the room acoustics were the problem this would help…but it made NO improvement at all. This should have stopped whatever sound is bouncing around from the walls I would have thought. Can it be the mic that is at fault? Do I need to hang fabrics on all the office walls?What should I upgrade mic to on a not-so-big budget? The minimum that will still sound good. Thanks!

    • #215384
      Avatarpaulears
      Participant

      A PG 48 is a rather dull microphone, it’s designed to work best with somebody speaking or singing loudly into it – but, I suspect that you are probably just using it poorly. It’s a cardioid, and has quite a strong proximity effect. As you go in close, the bass response tips up out of proportion with the treble. Music people use this for effect, but for speech – the result is dull, muddy and pretty nasty. I’m betting you are almost lips on the grill, or perhaps an inch or two back? If you back off to 6″ or a foot – the mic will become more neutral (but quieter). You then need to apply gain – this is the snag. You have a home stereo style interface, not a proper recording one. Gain has to be applied in software and it could work – you have to experiment, but my guess will be that you will find the result a bit noisy – plenty of hiss. Hopefully, the performance will be better than this and it will be usable. Most people who need to do semi-serious audio will be looking at interfaces that have 3 pin XLR mic connectors, and probably 48V phantom power so you can use condenser mics too. Lexicons, Scarletts, m-audio – that kind of product.

      See if you can get enough gain and increase the distance and see what the results are?

    • #216234
      Avatarwaywardson
      Member

      first and foremost I would check and make sure (mic boost isn’t on).in windows settings.

    • #216235
      Avatarwaywardson
      Member

      first and foremost I would check and make sure (mic boost isn’t on).in windows settings.

    • #216245
      CharlesBennettCharlesBennett
      Participant

      A different mic will not change things. You need acoustic treatment to tame the room reflections. A piece of foam around the mic will not help at all. A possible short term solution is to use a Se Electronics Reflection Filter or similar, and have a large absorbent surface positioned behind you. The larger the space and parallel hard surfaces, the greater the problem will be. If you are looking to do this long term proper room treatment is the first thing you should look at.

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