Help me out…..

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    • #72316
      AvatarCassius
      Participant

      I have a 5d markii and t4i for video. Was thinking of selling my 5d mark ii for a Gh3. Would it be worth it to switch systems?

    • #209680
      AvatarCassius
      Participant

      I do short film, weddings and Music videos. Another question is how would the BMCC work in a wedding setting?

    • #209787
      AvatarEvanca
      Member

      I am consider buying canon 60d. The only problem is I have to record continously for more then 29min and 59 sec and I am not able to push stop and then record agian because of the content I'm recording. I noticed that there are several external capture devices that you can hook monitors to but I am hoping to find a way around the record time limit for as little costs possible. Any help would be great!

    • #209811
      AvatarEvanca
      Member

      Thanks so much for the advice this has definitely opened my eyes to a line of cameras that seem like they will be very benifical  to what in trying to do. While researching I have also come across the gh2. Is the gh2 better then the g6?

    • #209895
      AvatarCassius
      Participant

      Ok brunerww just got the gh3 with a 12-35 2.8 and a dmw-ms2 mic i got off of ebay in excellent condition. A little help with picture style for better PP in adobe and the white balance system. 

    • #209687
      AvatarJKnight
      Member

      I recommend the BMPCC, same quality as the BMCC for less basically, the BMPCC or BMCC will WAY WAY out perform any of the other cameras you mentioned in quality if you know how to color correct and grade. A BMPCC plus davinci resolve can get you red epic/alexa quality footage. If your not accustomed to properly grading footage you may want to learn it.

       

      The BMCC can be paired up with and stabilizer equipement but requires expensive SSD drives to record on, you will need big drives to record onto continously. BMPCC can record onto a select few SD cards, there is a approved list of cards, with the BMPCC you will need to change batteries and cards often, and choosing lenses will be somewhat difficult but you can get a good setup for about $2400 with one lens, $3000 will get you the camera, the cards and batteries you need, a 15mm rod system, and matte box, top handle, lenses and adpaters and the quality of a red with some post grading.

       

      hope that helps

      Jknight

      video production syracuse ny

    • #209800
      Avatarbrunerww
      Member

      [QUOTE]I have a 5d markii and t4i for video. Was thinking of selling my 5d mark ii for a Gh3. Would it be worth it to switch systems?[/QUOTE]

       

      Yes, it is definitely worth it.  I sold my T2i for the GH2 in 2010, and before upgrading to the GH3 in 2012, I rented the T4i to see if I should go back to Canon.

       

      The answer was no.  I really liked that my Panasonics have built-in EVFs, so I don't need a loupe or an external EVF.

       

      I liked that the Panasonics had essentially unlimited continuous recording, so I didn't have to restart the camera every 12 or 30 minutes if I wanted to record an event, ceremony or play.

       

      I liked that the GH3 had 1080/60p and a headphone jack, features reserved for much more expensive Canons.

       

      Switching was one of the smartest camera decisions I ever made.

       

       

      [QUOTE]I do short film, weddings and Music videos. Another question is how would the BMCC work in a wedding setting?[/QUOTE]

       

      Blackmagic cameras  produce stunning images (when graded correctly), but you have to rig these cameras to make them usable in an event setting. I have the BMPCC, and I put a loupe and pistol grip on mine to make it less of an ergonomic nightmare:

       

       

       

      That said, you can tell beautiful wedding stories with either the BMCC or the BMPCC (I didn't shoot these):

       

       

      BMCC (ProRes, REC709 Video):

       

       

       

       

       

      BMPCC:

       

       

       

       

       

      I love the "gradeability" and dynamic range of these cameras, but the final result really depends on the skill of the colorist.

       

      In my view, the $990 GH3 comes out of the box ready to shoot – while the $995 BMPCC and the $1995 BMCC EF need an additional investment of time, money and effort in order to make them usable. 

       

      Only you can decide whether that investment is worth it for your clients and your style of shooting.

       

      Hope this is helpful!

       

      Bill

      Hybrid Camera Revolution

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • #209799
      Avatarbrunerww
      Member

      [QUOTE]I am consider buying canon 60d. The only problem is I have to record continously for more then 29min and 59 sec and I am not able to push stop and then record agian because of the content I'm recording. I noticed that there are several external capture devices that you can hook monitors to but I am hoping to find a way around the record time limit for as little costs possible. Any help would be great![/QUOTE]

       

      Hi Evanca – If you need to record for longer than half an hour continuously, you should not get the 60D.  It has a 12 minute continuous video recording limit, and is susceptible to a phenomenon called moire (shimmering, colored lines on patterned subjects such as shingled roofs, brickwork and patterned fabrics), as seen in these side-by-side comparisons with the Panasonic GH2:

       

       

      http://vimeo.com/20565849

       

       

       

      http://vimeo.com/21962491

       

       

       

      The only moire-resistant, large sensor, interchangeable lens cameras (with hours of continuous recording time) are the Panasonics.  No expensive external recorder required.  The newer models also record at frame rates up to 1080/60p – something no Canon DSLR below the $12,000 Canon 1D C can do.

       

       

      If your budget is less than $700, I recommend you consider the $629 (on sale, with kit lens) Panasonic G6 for events. Here is what this camera can do in a wedding setting:

       

       

       

       

       

      If you can stretch your budget a few hundred dollars more, I recommend the $990 (body only) Panasonic GH3.  This camera has several features the G6 lacks, e.g., a headphone jack, a spashproof all-metal body and the abillity to record to the same .Quicktime .MOV format as the Canons.

       

      Here is what the GH3 can do at a wedding:

       

       

       

       

       

       

      In my opinion, for 8-bit h.264 shooters, these are the best value-for-money large sensor interchangeable lens cameras on the market right now.

       

      Hope this is helpful!

       

      Bill

      Hybrid Camera Revolution

       

       

       

       

    • #209814
      Avatarbrunerww
      Member

      [QUOTE]Thanks so much for the advice this has definitely opened my eyes to a line of cameras that seem like they will be very benifical  to what in trying to do. While researching I have also come across the gh2. Is the gh2 better then the g6?[/QUOTE]

       

      The GH2 is a discontinued older model.  You can still find them used, but there are a few downsides – the GH2 lacks the G6's 1080/60p frame rate, focus peaking, intervalometer, wi-fi/NFC and 3.5mm mic jack (it has a non-standard 2.5mm jack).

       

      Here is a picture of my GH2 with the $5 adapter I have to keep plugged into the camera in order to use microphones with standard jacks:

       

       

      That said, there are firmware "hacks" available for the GH1 and GH2 which allow these cameras to record at bit rates up to 200mbps – about 10 times faster than the G6's 28mbps.

       

      The image quality from these hacks can be stunning – but they can also be unreliable, dropping frames, freezing your camera – or worse.  In the middle of a shoot, this can be disastrous.  Some of the more stable hacks carry less risk, but also lower bit rates.

       

      Here's a side-by-side of the two cameras – one is a hacked GH2 (70mbps), the other is the G6 (limited to 1080/24p at 24mbps, not its maximum 1080/60p 28mbps).  In my view the G6 competes very well against the hacked GH2:

       

       

       

       

       

      For me, the risk  of the hack isn't worth it.  If the choice is between a hacked, 2010-era GH2 and a stock 2013 G6, I would get the more modern camera.

       

       

      Again, hope this is helpful!

       

      Bill

      Hybrid Camera Revolution

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