Help Choose Camera

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    • #85296
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I plan to purchase a new video camera, and have a budget of about $2,500. I will use the camera for in field & studio interviews, events, and ads/promos for a missions ministry. Some of the work may need to be broadcast quality to use on local TV stations.
      I’ve looked at the online documentation and reviews of the Canon XA20, the Canon XF100, and the Sony PXW-X70. Each seem to have their pros & cons.
      The XA20- 35MB/s max MP4 recording, no manual white balance
      Canon XF100- Many reports of image noise even in good light
      Sony PXW-X70- XAVC codec not supported by Adobe CS6
      I use Adobe CS6 and can’t afford to pay a subscription for CC. It seems that the only conversion software that works is about $350 and that is a little out of reach for us right now.
      Which of these cameras would any of you pros suggest, or do you have any comments on them. Also are there any other cameras that you might think would serve us well?
      Thanks in advance!

    • #212036
      Avatartheonecanoe
      Participant

      I'm not really familiar with the XF100 or the PXW-X70, but the XA20 is an excellent camera.  It does have manual white balance setting, in fact it allows you to set 2 different manual WB settings.  And note the 35Mbps recording rate for mp4 recordings is only at 60p, if most of your recordings are at 30p frame rate, you top out at 24Mbps, but this still gives excellent results.

    • #212037
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      To theonecanoe – I guess I should have used the term "custom" white balance. As best I could tell from what I've read with the XA20 you can choose auto or one of two presets. Is that your experience or have I misunderstood? And can the XA20 record broadcast quality?

    • #212038
      Avatartheonecanoe
      Participant

      Howard, the XA20 has the the normal 'Auto' setting.  It also has 6 additional settings for Daylight, Shade, Cloudy, Flourescent, Flourescent H, and Tungsten.  It also has 2 custom (manual) settings, Set 1 and Set 2.  In additiopn to these settings you can dial in any color temperature setting in 100 degree increments from 2,000 degrees kelvin to 15,000 degrees kelvin.   

    • #212040
      Avatarbrunerww
      Member

      You might want to consider two other camcorders in this price range, the $2300 large sensor, interchangeable lens Sony NEX-EA50 and the $2695 4K JVC GY-HM200 with built-in live streaming.

       

      Here are some examples of the image quality you can expect from the EA50's large sensor:

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Note the shallow depth of field (blurred backgrounds) due to the large sensor.  This "look" is difficult to achieve with a small sensor camera.

       

      Here is the image quality you can expect from the HM200 (please watch at 2160p):

       

       

       

       

       

       

      "How to" on live streaming:

       

       

       

       

      The Sony has the large sensor – but the HM200 has 4 times the resolution. 1080p cameras are probably not a very good investment right now.

       

      Hope this is helpful and good luck with your decision!

       

      Bill

      Hybrid Camera Revolution

       

       

       

       

       

    • #212042
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks Bill, 4k is one of the reasons I was looking at the Sony PXW-X70. It has a large 1inch sensor and says it will upgrade to 4k this year with a firmware update. I don't use 4k presently but it looks like that is the dirrection everyone is headed. But I have to say I am impressed with both of the cameras you suggested. What is JVC's reputation, I've been told by several folks to try to stick with Sony or Canon. What is your oppinion?

    • #212046
      Avatarbrunerww
      Member

      If you walk into the TV stations in your area, you will likely see a wide range of Hitachi, Ikegami, JVC, Sony, Panasonic and Canon cameras.

       

      JVC has been a leader in professional camcorders (especially electronic news gathering) for many years.

       

      They have had less of a presence in the consumer/prosumer markeplace, however (especially when compared to Sony, Panasonic and Canon).

       

      I would have no qualms about buying a JVC pro or prosumer camcorder.

       

       

       

       

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