Full Frame vs. Cropped Frame | Am i getting the right starter camera?

Videomaker – Learn video production and editing, camera reviews Forums Cameras and Camcorders DSLR’s Full Frame vs. Cropped Frame | Am i getting the right starter camera?

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    • #96910

      My main question is about the importance of sensors. I've read up a bit about it, and it seems you it's harder to capture the same field of view that a Full Frame captures with an APS-C; But i figured that would matter on the lens…

      Back Story: I've been meaning to get into video since High School, i just haven't had the funds and availability to invest into equipment until now. I'm looking to primarily focus on freelance video work (Music Videos, Live Event Shoots, Commercials, Etc..).  I'm going to invest anywhere from $1k-$2k on start-up equipment and i want to make sure i choose the right thing. I was going to invest in a Camcorder, However being able to offer Photography as a service is rather important to me as well; & i don't see merely any benefits in a camcorder over a DSLR, as i don't believe you can swap lens's (if there are huge benefits, I'd like to hear about them!). So I'm looking at getting a Sony a6300 so that i can shootin 4K, as well as HD 120fps for slow action shots & it's got an APS-C sensor.

      With all that being said; I haven't been able to find too much about the different censors pertaining to STRICTLY video, as that's my primary concern. Is there any specifc pro's cons, or any legitimate reasons that a Full Frame would be ideal for video? Or can i make up for/recreate the effect manually/digitally on an APS-C sensor (if desired)?

    • #301396
      AvatarRonaldlees
      Member

      Are you still looking for equipment?  I am in the same boat.  I have a bridge camera (super novice level of course) – but am looking for video upgrade into about  the same range as you, as a second step.

      I think with your $investment level, you're probably talking about APS-C or maybe APS-H.  I've already decided on the APS-H for my stills camera (Sigma Quatro H).   But, your (and mine) investment includes more than just the camera, so $2k is still pretty low and probably hard to do.   Did you buy anything yet?

    • #283704
      Avataralorton
      Participant

      With a full frame camera, the lens focal lengths are actually what they say they are. On an aps-c sensor a 24mm lens is like 40. If you have 2k$ the a7iii is a really great all around camera and is full frame.

    • #283897
      AvatarGaetan Berteaux
      Participant

      Also, a full frame will make a better depth of field than an APS-C sensor (for the same aperture)
      It’s better in video to have a very small depth of field : it’s more esthetic ! But be careful to don’t abuse of very small depth of field haha

    • #72008692
      reelcoolfilmzreelcoolfilmz
      Participant

      This is an old thread but I actually started with a APS-C (Canon T3i) It was within my budget and I made the best of it. They above statements about focal lengths are correct. You pretty much have to take into consideration that an APS-C sensor will add a 1.6 crop factor (if you use a camera like a Canon T3I or 80D). But you can still achieve very nice video.

      I now shoot with a canon 80D and 5DMarkIV (I had to sell a kidney) … I added a nice Sigma Art 35mm Lens and it looks stunning on my 80D… which turns the 35mm into a 56mm look. If I use it on my 5D I get a true 35mm video.

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