First 15 minute travel show

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    • #68380
      AvatarEric
      Participant

      Last summer I started videoing a few rides in my area.  They have grown and this summer I have gotten the opportunity to travel some and video other areas.  I was use to shooting 5 to 8 minute rides but needed something longer for this trip.  I was planning on a 20 to 25 minute episode, being my first attempt I hit the 15 minute mark missing one planned ride. 

       

      I have a ton to learn, and appreciate any feedback thanks.

    • #208127
      AvatarDaniel Bruns
      Participant

      Hi Eric,

       

      I'm a pretty tough critic when it comes to other people's films and videos, but I have to say that this video was great! Like I said in another post you had, these videos show a passion for riding that is very infectious. I find your comments about riding fascinating due to your obvious joy in it. These videos really make me want to buy a motorcycle and start riding myself!

       

      That being said, there were a few areas of your video that could use some quick improvement. First, when you're doing your voice overs in studio or back at your home, make sure to use a wind filter or pop filter over the microphone that you're speaking into. I noticed a number of vocal plosives and pops in your audio narration due to a short burst of air hitting your microphone. This should be an easy fix to do. In fact, Videomaker actually has articles showing you how to make one of your own out of common materials: http://www.videomaker.com/article/8432-do-it-yourself-hoop-windscreen-pop-filter.

       

      Also, there was a jump cut in your video around the 3:28 mark. The video was fading to black but it came back for a quick second before cutting away. You'll want to make sure to watch your finished video all the way through a few times before exporting it in the future. It's an easy mistake to make!

       

      Lastly, you composed a number of your indoors shots against a window. This is usually a background to be avoided unless you have ND filters to place on the window or unless the lighting indoors is just as strong as the lighting outdoors (which almost never happens). In the future, it would be a good idea to swap places with the camera so that you're looking into the building. This way, the lighting will be even throughout.

       

      As a last comment, I really like the fact that you interviewed some of the owners of the places you visited. It gave the locations legitimacy and a down-to-earth feel and broke up the solo narration which made the video more exciting. In my opinion, you should try to do this more in the future!

       

      I hope those comments help you. Keep up the good work. You'll have to come by my area in Northern California some day for a ride next to Mt. Shasta (14,000 ft) and Mt Lassen (10,000 ft). There are curvy roads galore in those places!

       

      Dan

    • #208138
      AvatarEric
      Participant

      Dan,

      Thank you for the tips, I will implement them in future videos.  Also thanks for all the help in the other thread I REALLY APPRECIATE IT!

    • #208155
      AvatarDaniel Bruns
      Participant

      No problem man! Hopefully some other filmmakers will chime in as well in order to help you refine your style and workflow.

       

      Happy riding!

       

      Dan

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