Editing full HD

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    • #51357
      Avatartinurich
      Participant

      Hello,

       

      Please what do I require to edit full HD without reducing the quality of the footage.

    • #204546
      Avatartinurich
      Participant

      ok

    • #204558
      AvatarJackWolcott
      Participant

      You should be able to do this with any major editing program — Sony Vegas Pro, Adobe Premiere, etc., assuming your computer is powerful enough to handle it.  HD footage should drop in directly onto the time line.

    • #204566
      Avatarsaltlakestudio
      Participant

      Try to use Adobe Premier and make sure you edit it in an appropriate desktop for power editing. Avoid converting so that the quality will not change.
      http://www.saltlakecitystudio.com/

    • #204578
      Luis Maymi LopezLuis Maymi Lopez
      Participant

      What do you currently have? Have you editted video before? Windows or Mac? Apologies for asking so much, video productions needs to consider every detail. 

    • #204611
      Avatarsteven
      Participant

       render your final production first in the lowest possible resolution for a cell phone and use that at a draft to check that you are ok with everything – when you are sure you are ready – render at best quality when you have time to let it cook 

    • #302859
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

       For a long time I messed around with what an eight-year-old computer was capable of. I had hours of material transcoded to mp4 at 1280 x 720, and suffered all the usual problems of mp4, including blockiness in clear skies and other artifacts. There simply had to be a better way, and for me, this is 'it'. Let me make it clear that I do not use one of the 'usual' video-editors, such as those from Adobe, Sony, etc. I use 'Magix', from Germany, in two versions, eg whichever best suits the task in hand, of 'Movie Edit Pro MX' or 'Video Pro-X 4'. The critical factor here, is that 'Magix's' own video format 'mxv' is available, and it seems to have very high performance; almost equivalent,I would say, to an uncompressed format, of which I also have several at my disposal.

       

       Each video-clip is re-encoded from m2ts to 'Cineform' Intermediate format in ten or twelve-bit. The clips are introduced to the timeline in 1920 x 1080 in that format. The subsequent render of the finished, edited, material is to 'mxv', and it is from that format, that the feature may be either stored, archived, or burned-to-disc. There are none of the 'artifacts' of any mpg process to be worried about. The crucial thing, to preserve as much of the original quality as possible, is to retain the use of twelve-bit logic right through the entire process to the final stages, if possible. 

       

       This working method has the advantage of cutting out many of the stages which used to lead to degraded performance. If the colour 'effects' and grading aids in 'Cineform' don't hack-it, you may avail yourself of 'First-Light' which comes as part of the package, which is like sitting down at the control console of the 'Starship Enterprise'. My most recent assignment, has been to regrade colours from clips taken at different times of the year, including winter (eg very golden light at

      46degS. at that time lof the year), and marry it successfully to summer footage in light which has the highest actinic values of any light anywhere on the planet and contains so much 'soot and whitewash' tonal range-wise, that summer shooting conditions are usuallhy marginal between 11am and about 3pm. Keeping in HD, has preserved much better detail and colour-fidelity than 1920 x 1080 converted to other formats and most hue adjustments are able to be handled by adjustment of the 'white-level' alone. 'Gain', 'Gamma' and 'Lift' take care of other contingencies.

       

       The downside, is horrendously large files, but those are only temporary. The only thing needing to be archived, is the original m2ts files. Everything else is able to be reconstituted, from those.

       

       Ian Smith

       Dunedin, New Zealand.   

    • #301584
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

       For a long time I messed around with what an eight-year-old computer was capable of. I had hours of material transcoded to mp4 at 1280 x 720, and suffered all the usual problems of mp4, including blockiness in clear skies and other artifacts. There simply had to be a better way, and for me, this is 'it'. Let me make it clear that I do not use one of the 'usual' video-editors, such as those from Adobe, Sony, etc. I use 'Magix', from Germany, in two versions, eg whichever best suits the task in hand, of 'Movie Edit Pro MX' or 'Video Pro-X 4'. The critical factor here, is that 'Magix's' own video format 'mxv' is available, and it seems to have very high performance; almost equivalent,I would say, to an uncompressed format, of which I also have several at my disposal.

       

       Each video-clip is re-encoded from m2ts to 'Cineform' Intermediate format in ten or twelve-bit. The clips are introduced to the timeline in 1920 x 1080 in that format. The subsequent render of the finished, edited, material is to 'mxv', and it is from that format, that the feature may be either stored, archived, or burned-to-disc. There are none of the 'artifacts' of any mpg process to be worried about. The crucial thing, to preserve as much of the original quality as possible, is to retain the use of twelve-bit logic right through the entire process to the final stages, if possible. 

       

       This working method has the advantage of cutting out many of the stages which used to lead to degraded performance. If the colour 'effects' and grading aids in 'Cineform' don't hack-it, you may avail yourself of 'First-Light' which comes as part of the package, which is like sitting down at the control console of the 'Starship Enterprise'. My most recent assignment, has been to regrade colours from clips taken at different times of the year, including winter (eg very golden light at

      46degS. at that time lof the year), and marry it successfully to summer footage in light which has the highest actinic values of any light anywhere on the planet and contains so much 'soot and whitewash' tonal range-wise, that summer shooting conditions are usuallhy marginal between 11am and about 3pm. Keeping in HD, has preserved much better detail and colour-fidelity than 1920 x 1080 converted to other formats and most hue adjustments are able to be handled by adjustment of the 'white-level' alone. 'Gain', 'Gamma' and 'Lift' take care of other contingencies.

       

       The downside, is horrendously large files, but those are only temporary. The only thing needing to be archived, is the original m2ts files. Everything else is able to be reconstituted, from those.

       

       Ian Smith

       Dunedin, New Zealand.   

    • #301914
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

       For a long time I messed around with what an eight-year-old computer was capable of. I had hours of material transcoded to mp4 at 1280 x 720, and suffered all the usual problems of mp4, including blockiness in clear skies and other artifacts. There simply had to be a better way, and for me, this is 'it'. Let me make it clear that I do not use one of the 'usual' video-editors, such as those from Adobe, Sony, etc. I use 'Magix', from Germany, in two versions, eg whichever best suits the task in hand, of 'Movie Edit Pro MX' or 'Video Pro-X 4'. The critical factor here, is that 'Magix's' own video format 'mxv' is available, and it seems to have very high performance; almost equivalent,I would say, to an uncompressed format, of which I also have several at my disposal.

       

       Each video-clip is re-encoded from m2ts to 'Cineform' Intermediate format in ten or twelve-bit. The clips are introduced to the timeline in 1920 x 1080 in that format. The subsequent render of the finished, edited, material is to 'mxv', and it is from that format, that the feature may be either stored, archived, or burned-to-disc. There are none of the 'artifacts' of any mpg process to be worried about. The crucial thing, to preserve as much of the original quality as possible, is to retain the use of twelve-bit logic right through the entire process to the final stages, if possible. 

       

       This working method has the advantage of cutting out many of the stages which used to lead to degraded performance. If the colour 'effects' and grading aids in 'Cineform' don't hack-it, you may avail yourself of 'First-Light' which comes as part of the package, which is like sitting down at the control console of the 'Starship Enterprise'. My most recent assignment, has been to regrade colours from clips taken at different times of the year, including winter (eg very golden light at

      46degS. at that time lof the year), and marry it successfully to summer footage in light which has the highest actinic values of any light anywhere on the planet and contains so much 'soot and whitewash' tonal range-wise, that summer shooting conditions are usuallhy marginal between 11am and about 3pm. Keeping in HD, has preserved much better detail and colour-fidelity than 1920 x 1080 converted to other formats and most hue adjustments are able to be handled by adjustment of the 'white-level' alone. 'Gain', 'Gamma' and 'Lift' take care of other contingencies.

       

       The downside, is horrendously large files, but those are only temporary. The only thing needing to be archived, is the original m2ts files. Everything else is able to be reconstituted, from those.

       

       Ian Smith

       Dunedin, New Zealand.   

    • #204641
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

       For a long time I messed around with what an eight-year-old computer was capable of. I had hours of material transcoded to mp4 at 1280 x 720, and suffered all the usual problems of mp4, including blockiness in clear skies and other artifacts. There simply had to be a better way, and for me, this is 'it'. Let me make it clear that I do not use one of the 'usual' video-editors, such as those from Adobe, Sony, etc. I use 'Magix', from Germany, in two versions, eg whichever best suits the task in hand, of 'Movie Edit Pro MX' or 'Video Pro-X 4'. The critical factor here, is that 'Magix's' own video format 'mxv' is available, and it seems to have very high performance; almost equivalent,I would say, to an uncompressed format, of which I also have several at my disposal.

       

       Each video-clip is re-encoded from m2ts to 'Cineform' Intermediate format in ten or twelve-bit. The clips are introduced to the timeline in 1920 x 1080 in that format. The subsequent render of the finished, edited, material is to 'mxv', and it is from that format, that the feature may be either stored, archived, or burned-to-disc. There are none of the 'artifacts' of any mpg process to be worried about. The crucial thing, to preserve as much of the original quality as possible, is to retain the use of twelve-bit logic right through the entire process to the final stages, if possible. 

       

       This working method has the advantage of cutting out many of the stages which used to lead to degraded performance. If the colour 'effects' and grading aids in 'Cineform' don't hack-it, you may avail yourself of 'First-Light' which comes as part of the package, which is like sitting down at the control console of the 'Starship Enterprise'. My most recent assignment, has been to regrade colours from clips taken at different times of the year, including winter (eg very golden light at

      46degS. at that time lof the year), and marry it successfully to summer footage in light which has the highest actinic values of any light anywhere on the planet and contains so much 'soot and whitewash' tonal range-wise, that summer shooting conditions are usuallhy marginal between 11am and about 3pm. Keeping in HD, has preserved much better detail and colour-fidelity than 1920 x 1080 converted to other formats and most hue adjustments are able to be handled by adjustment of the 'white-level' alone. 'Gain', 'Gamma' and 'Lift' take care of other contingencies.

       

       The downside, is horrendously large files, but those are only temporary. The only thing needing to be archived, is the original m2ts files. Everything else is able to be reconstituted, from those.

       

       Ian Smith

       Dunedin, New Zealand.   

    • #302181
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

       For a long time I messed around with what an eight-year-old computer was capable of. I had hours of material transcoded to mp4 at 1280 x 720, and suffered all the usual problems of mp4, including blockiness in clear skies and other artifacts. There simply had to be a better way, and for me, this is 'it'. Let me make it clear that I do not use one of the 'usual' video-editors, such as those from Adobe, Sony, etc. I use 'Magix', from Germany, in two versions, eg whichever best suits the task in hand, of 'Movie Edit Pro MX' or 'Video Pro-X 4'. The critical factor here, is that 'Magix's' own video format 'mxv' is available, and it seems to have very high performance; almost equivalent,I would say, to an uncompressed format, of which I also have several at my disposal.

       

       Each video-clip is re-encoded from m2ts to 'Cineform' Intermediate format in ten or twelve-bit. The clips are introduced to the timeline in 1920 x 1080 in that format. The subsequent render of the finished, edited, material is to 'mxv', and it is from that format, that the feature may be either stored, archived, or burned-to-disc. There are none of the 'artifacts' of any mpg process to be worried about. The crucial thing, to preserve as much of the original quality as possible, is to retain the use of twelve-bit logic right through the entire process to the final stages, if possible. 

       

       This working method has the advantage of cutting out many of the stages which used to lead to degraded performance. If the colour 'effects' and grading aids in 'Cineform' don't hack-it, you may avail yourself of 'First-Light' which comes as part of the package, which is like sitting down at the control console of the 'Starship Enterprise'. My most recent assignment, has been to regrade colours from clips taken at different times of the year, including winter (eg very golden light at

      46degS. at that time lof the year), and marry it successfully to summer footage in light which has the highest actinic values of any light anywhere on the planet and contains so much 'soot and whitewash' tonal range-wise, that summer shooting conditions are usuallhy marginal between 11am and about 3pm. Keeping in HD, has preserved much better detail and colour-fidelity than 1920 x 1080 converted to other formats and most hue adjustments are able to be handled by adjustment of the 'white-level' alone. 'Gain', 'Gamma' and 'Lift' take care of other contingencies.

       

       The downside, is horrendously large files, but those are only temporary. The only thing needing to be archived, is the original m2ts files. Everything else is able to be reconstituted, from those.

       

       Ian Smith

       Dunedin, New Zealand.   

    • #302705
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

       For a long time I messed around with what an eight-year-old computer was capable of. I had hours of material transcoded to mp4 at 1280 x 720, and suffered all the usual problems of mp4, including blockiness in clear skies and other artifacts. There simply had to be a better way, and for me, this is 'it'. Let me make it clear that I do not use one of the 'usual' video-editors, such as those from Adobe, Sony, etc. I use 'Magix', from Germany, in two versions, eg whichever best suits the task in hand, of 'Movie Edit Pro MX' or 'Video Pro-X 4'. The critical factor here, is that 'Magix's' own video format 'mxv' is available, and it seems to have very high performance; almost equivalent,I would say, to an uncompressed format, of which I also have several at my disposal.

       

       Each video-clip is re-encoded from m2ts to 'Cineform' Intermediate format in ten or twelve-bit. The clips are introduced to the timeline in 1920 x 1080 in that format. The subsequent render of the finished, edited, material is to 'mxv', and it is from that format, that the feature may be either stored, archived, or burned-to-disc. There are none of the 'artifacts' of any mpg process to be worried about. The crucial thing, to preserve as much of the original quality as possible, is to retain the use of twelve-bit logic right through the entire process to the final stages, if possible. 

       

       This working method has the advantage of cutting out many of the stages which used to lead to degraded performance. If the colour 'effects' and grading aids in 'Cineform' don't hack-it, you may avail yourself of 'First-Light' which comes as part of the package, which is like sitting down at the control console of the 'Starship Enterprise'. My most recent assignment, has been to regrade colours from clips taken at different times of the year, including winter (eg very golden light at

      46degS. at that time lof the year), and marry it successfully to summer footage in light which has the highest actinic values of any light anywhere on the planet and contains so much 'soot and whitewash' tonal range-wise, that summer shooting conditions are usuallhy marginal between 11am and about 3pm. Keeping in HD, has preserved much better detail and colour-fidelity than 1920 x 1080 converted to other formats and most hue adjustments are able to be handled by adjustment of the 'white-level' alone. 'Gain', 'Gamma' and 'Lift' take care of other contingencies.

       

       The downside, is horrendously large files, but those are only temporary. The only thing needing to be archived, is the original m2ts files. Everything else is able to be reconstituted, from those.

       

       Ian Smith

       Dunedin, New Zealand.   

    • #301793
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

       For a long time I messed around with what an eight-year-old computer was capable of. I had hours of material transcoded to mp4 at 1280 x 720, and suffered all the usual problems of mp4, including blockiness in clear skies and other artifacts. There simply had to be a better way, and for me, this is 'it'. Let me make it clear that I do not use one of the 'usual' video-editors, such as those from Adobe, Sony, etc. I use 'Magix', from Germany, in two versions, eg whichever best suits the task in hand, of 'Movie Edit Pro MX' or 'Video Pro-X 4'. The critical factor here, is that 'Magix's' own video format 'mxv' is available, and it seems to have very high performance; almost equivalent,I would say, to an uncompressed format, of which I also have several at my disposal.

       

       Each video-clip is re-encoded from m2ts to 'Cineform' Intermediate format in ten or twelve-bit. The clips are introduced to the timeline in 1920 x 1080 in that format. The subsequent render of the finished, edited, material is to 'mxv', and it is from that format, that the feature may be either stored, archived, or burned-to-disc. There are none of the 'artifacts' of any mpg process to be worried about. The crucial thing, to preserve as much of the original quality as possible, is to retain the use of twelve-bit logic right through the entire process to the final stages, if possible. 

       

       This working method has the advantage of cutting out many of the stages which used to lead to degraded performance. If the colour 'effects' and grading aids in 'Cineform' don't hack-it, you may avail yourself of 'First-Light' which comes as part of the package, which is like sitting down at the control console of the 'Starship Enterprise'. My most recent assignment, has been to regrade colours from clips taken at different times of the year, including winter (eg very golden light at

      46degS. at that time lof the year), and marry it successfully to summer footage in light which has the highest actinic values of any light anywhere on the planet and contains so much 'soot and whitewash' tonal range-wise, that summer shooting conditions are usuallhy marginal between 11am and about 3pm. Keeping in HD, has preserved much better detail and colour-fidelity than 1920 x 1080 converted to other formats and most hue adjustments are able to be handled by adjustment of the 'white-level' alone. 'Gain', 'Gamma' and 'Lift' take care of other contingencies.

       

       The downside, is horrendously large files, but those are only temporary. The only thing needing to be archived, is the original m2ts files. Everything else is able to be reconstituted, from those.

       

       Ian Smith

       Dunedin, New Zealand.   

    • #204651
      Avatarpaulears
      Participant

      Don't you just hate it when people ask a question, expect an immediate answer, then never come back!

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