Computer requirements

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    • #81461
      AvatarDsalt
      Participant

      Hello,

      So I’ll jump right in…
      I recently got into editing and fell in love with it but it took some time before I got into editing because I didn’t have anything.
      At some point I bought the Canon 7D second hand which I’m really happy with!
      Then, since I only have a PC laptop I bought Corel Studio but over the past few months I reached a point where all my enthusiasm is being held by aggressive feelings I have towards my laptop.
      It’s absolutely horrid!
      Doesn’t run anything smoothly.
      Yes, I can make a 2 minute video with a few clips but once I tried to make a 13 minute video everything was frozen and I could barely do the lip synch.

      The thing is that if my computer, which has 8gig RAM the i7 and Radeon can’t cope with Corel I’d be foolish to think that it can deal with Premiere!

      So I’ve realised that although many of these programs state that my system requirements are sufficient in reality they’re NOT!

      At least not if I don’t want to get angry every 60 seconds.

      So here are my questions…

      What are the requirements for an easy, fun, fluid work flow on Premiere, etc?

      Also, I’ve never had a Mac or anything by Apple for that matter but I’ve started to realise that most edit on a Mac.
      Should I switch to apple then?

      BTW, here’s the video I tried to edit and couldn’t really do a good job because everything would freeze all the time…

      Any help would be appreciated.

  • #210981
    AvatarFredwong19
    Participant

    Well, to start off, I don't think your computer is the problem. I have a Dell laptop with 8 gigs of ram, a i7 2.4 Ghz quad core processor, and a Nvidia 525m graphics card. My laptop runs Premiere Pro very well. In fact, I'm also able to run Adobe After Effects, and even Cinema 4D on it. Granted, Cinema 4D does run a bit slow on it at times, but it handles Adobe Premiere Pro quite nicly. 

     

    But when I used to use Cyberlink, a cheaper video editing program, I could bearly do simple video editing of 2min clips on my laptop.

     

    I have never used Corel Studio, but I think it might be your problem. Some lower end video editing programs, like CyberLink, are not optimized to take advantage of your computers power, and are usually not as stable. But a video editing program like Adobe Premier Pro, on the other hand, is optimized, and there for runs much smoother.

     

    I think your 13 mins of video froze, because of a glitch of some sort. The same thing happend to me on CyberLink with only 2 minutes in it. But after I purchased Adobe Primer Pro, life just got a whole lot more fun! It runs much faster and I can easily edit over 30mins of video with out a problem. The max Video length I've tried is 3 hours, and it ran a little slow, but never locked up.

     

    I don't think your computer is the problem. I believe it might be the software, but I could be wrong.  I've never used Corel before, but this is my experience going from Cyberlink to Premiere Pro.  

    Hope it helps :). 

  • #210988
    AvatarEddieValiant
    Participant

    If the laptop is set up with the usual stuff, like anti-virus, and whatever else is running in the background, your processor may be busy doing other tasks, and the RAM may be partially used up by programs that are not needed. That will definitely keep your editor from running well. How's your hard drive? Is it more than 70% full? Have you defragged it recently? NLEs need a lot of system resources and work best when they don't have to share resources.

     

    I run Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 on my four year old that has an I-5 2.4 GHz processor and 8GB of RAM, 64bit Windows 7. It's not nearly as good as my dedicated video workstation but for small jobs, it works just fine.  

     

    Clean up your laptop, free up resources by shutting down any programs your don't need running in the background and you might see a nice improvement in performance.

  • #210994
    Avatarcaffeinedependent
    Participant

    A few things to consider:

    1) The slowest component in any PC is the hard hard drive. Video editing involves writing huge chunks of data to your hard drives, so a slow hard drive will most certainly affect your performance. Laptop hard drives are traditionally slower than desktop drives, as factors such as heat and mobility must be taken into account.  However, this is easily remedied by replacing the original drive with an solid state drive (SSD). SSDs are still fairly costly, but certainly a lot cheaper than replacing an entire laptop. 

    2) The second factor is the model of i7 CPU in your laptop, as all i7s are not created equal – some are quad core, but most are only dual core. My experience has been that, in terms of video editing, a laptop based on a quad core extreme edition 3rd generation CPU will outperform a similarly priced unit based on a 4th generation CPU, as this will only be a dual core. Units containing 4th generation extreme edition CPUs tend to be substantially more expensive with only a small gain in performance.

    3) Video editing doesn't require a powerful display card and, although more RAM is always welcome, you will see diminishing returns above 8GB.

     

    Even if your i7 CPU is only a dual core, I would recommend upgrading to an SSD, reloading Windows, installing only the necessary software and optimising the laptop for video. This should give you a substantial performance improvement, regardless of your video editing suite.

     

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