Camcorders for filming high speed action sports?

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    • #71240
      AvatarTIME2SMASH
      Participant

      Hello all, this is my first post on this forum, I apologize in advance if I am reposting or breaking any rules.

       

      I am an avid high speed downhill skatboarder and have been in to filming for a couple years now. However, I have only ever used action cameras such as GoPro. Now that both my skating and video editing skills have grown a bit, I want to move up to a better, more versatile camcorder. I have a handful of sponsors, so I really want to up the quality of my footage for video edits. I have been doing a lot of research and comparing specs, but just a minute ago I realized….I don;t even know what I'm comparing haha. My knowledge of cameras is pretty miniscule, so I am posting here in hopes that I can get some much needed info and get a camera that will suit my needs.

       

      A majority of filming will be filming while skating with others at speeds up to 65mph, and will most likely be filming from behind while following the others. I will also need something that I can get good shots from different angles from the side of the road, something that is good for panning shots without distortion(jello) is pretty much necessary if i want to get good shots of skaters coming and going in the same shot.

       

      Something that can shoot in low light, in case we skate a spot on a road through woods/skating in and out of the shade. I am moving to San Diego here shortly, so most of the roads will probably be fully lit. But for when i travel, getting quality footage in low light is a must.

       

      I also need something that is capable of shooting 60 frames per second in high quality so that slow motion is an option when it comes to editing. Options for plugging in external add-ons (like external mic) is also a plus. I have an Olympus e-300 that i use to take pictures so a photo option is not important to me.

       

      I was looking at the sony CX430v but I was unsure about the Balanced Optical SteadyShot feature. A buddy of mine mentioned to me that sometimes stabilzing features in camcorders can over compensate and cause distortion, but every camcorder I have looked into seems to have some kind of stabilizer feature so I don't really know what is good or bad.

       

       

      Here is a video we filmed several months ago using a GoPro and Contour action cameras to give you an idea of what the majority of filming will be like while skating.

      [video]https://vimeo.com/62883534[/video]

       

      except instead of using poles, i would be using a rig while skating.

       

      If i can get some suggestions on camcorders to consider, I would really appreciate it. I would like to keep it under 600$, closer to under 500$. New or refurbished, doesn;t matter, as long as it is awesome and does what I need. Thanks!

    • #209155
      Avatarbrunerww
      Member

      Hi Time2smash – the best video image quality you can get for $500 to $600 won't come from a camcorder.

       

      Fortunately, there is one camera under $600 that shoots at 1080/60p and can produce skate video like this:

       

       

      http://vimeo.com/78507820

       

       

      It is the $599 (with kit lens) Panasonic G6.  In addition to producing great video, it can also save you money.  With an inexpensive adapter, it can use your Olympus 4/3 lenses with full autofocus and electronic aperture control.

       

      Hope this is helpful!

       

      Bill

      Hybrid Camera Revolution

    • #209180
      AvatarLaguna Hiker
      Member

      Be very careful using any camera with a CMOS sensor. CMOS uses what's called a 'rolling shutter', as opposed to the 'global shutter' used by CCD sensors. Rolling shutters cause fast-moving objects to appear as if they are leaning–you can see examples by doing a Google search. For action sports, I generally recommend CCD cameras.

    • #209249
      AvatarSIP
      Participant

      "You can't reach 60 progressive frames per second with CCD, not at all. CCD has trouble with progressive scanning to begin with. So I think, certainly in terms of the throughput required by full HD video, it's an area where CMOS becomes an enabler." said Mark Weir, Sr Manager, Technology at Sony Electronics.

       

      You just can't get the data off the CCD fast enough + they have poor low light capabilities. The rolling shutter speed in these newer cameras, is higher then throughput speed of a CCD πŸ˜‰

       

       

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