Advice needed! Finding work

Viewing 7 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #85318
      Avatarkimlingc
      Member

      Hello everyone,

      I live in Atlanta, Ga and I am a videographer and editor. I have saved up money and bought my own equipment. I have been shooting everything I can but the oportunities are few and far between. Here is the videography part of my website http://kimlingc.wix.com/chriskimling#!videography/c2414

      I have been trying out thumbtack but im just throwing my money away because I dont get any responses.

      Please help!

      Thanks,

      Chris

    • #212053
      AvatarJackWolcott
      Participant

      I think the two most important factors in finding work are networking and finding a niche. Often videographers think of networking as hanging out with other videographers. But for generating business, Rotary, Kiwanis, Master Builder's Association, membership in a golf or tennis club, etc., are all good places to put in a regular appearance and get to know people. And if possible, go where the money is. There's no point in shmoozing with potential clients who can't afford to hire a videographer.

       

      That said, in the 17 years our company has been in business we've survived through thick and thin because we work in four specific areas: we work with large construction companies, with hospitals and medical professionals and we shoot theatrical events. We are known in each of these micro-communities as the "go to" people. We started getting jobs early on by networking with folks in this area, letting it be known what we could do and what our qualifications are to do it. Go to every hospital in your market area, for example, and talk to the person involved in training. Hospitals often bring in specialists that they'll want recorded for playback on the hospital intranet, their in-house web network.

       

      Large construction companies — that is, national and international level builders — often are required by contract or by law to provide training videos for all the major systems in the building. We recently spent 6 months (not every day but sometimes two or three times a week) documenting systems in a huge new car rental facility — generator operation, elevator maintainence, fuel handling, fire suppression, and all the computer systems for the building. We got this very lucrative job because we had worked on some smaller projects and had made very certain that everyone on the job site knew who we were and what we did.

       

      Starting out isn't easy; don't expect to live on your earnings for a year or so. Conventional wisdom in the business world has been that you should be able to survive for at least a couple of years with cash reseves that will allow you to make very little from your new business — just pay the bills if you're luck.

       

      I hope this helps. I've thoroughly enjoyed our business and can clearly remember the huge effort it took to get it off the ground.

    • #212062
      AvatarStanDan Pro
      Member

      Chris,

       

      I agree with Jack … our largest client is Florida Hospital and they use us constantly.  Although we are not the only video production team that they use we have certainly defined ourselves as the "go to" guys for creating humerous commercials that get their messages across.  Much of our work is infrastructural, but we also do a lot of advertisement for them as well.  The key is to get focus.

       

      Networking with the affluent is also a MUST!  One resource that I recommend is checking out http://www.kre8insights.com/ … they provide some great resources and tools for helping videographers with building businesses.  Purchase the 6 Figure Videographer … worth it!

       

      We are also finishing up our own video course where we show cash-starved videographers how to produce and profit from 30 second commercials in 30 days.  The course is complete and we just had our beta testers go through it … they loved it!  The class is currently waitlisted but you can find out more here http://www.ReelCrashCourse.com Applying the principles in this class has been one of the fastest ways we've gotten 5 figure deals (to pay for all of our equipment).

       

      Daniel

       

      ________________________________

      How to produce and profit from 30 second commercials in 30 days

      http://www.ReelCrashCourse.com

       

       

    • #212070
      Avatarkimlingc
      Member

      Does anyone know of good websites where I can find peoples ads looking for video work done? 

      Thanks for the advice so far, very helpful 

       

    • #212091
      AvatarStanDan Pro
      Member

      What do you mean by "ads looking for video work done?"  Do you mean people looking for videographers?  People looking for videos that are already done (stock footage)?

       

      I have never looked into Smart Shoot … but I here it's a great place for beginners to get their feet wet and make a few bucks (but not much).  You have to treat it as a "foot in the door" approach.

       

       

      ________________________________

      How to produce and profit from 30 second commercials in 30 days

      http://www.ReelCrashCourse.com

       

    • #212093
      Avatarmcrockett
      Member

      Chris,

           What kind of videos do you WANT to shoot?  That needs to be your first question.  If you can answer that, then you can go after the market that requires those sorts of videos.  For example, if you want to shoot performances, talk to local community theaters, or perhaps dance studios, and see if they need a videographer to film their performances.  If you want to shoot weddings, talk to local bridal stores.  Leave them a stack of business cards so that they can refer their customers to you.

           This doesn't mean you should lock yourself down to one type of video production.  But start with one thing, the thing you want to do, and then you may or may not want to branch out.  But chances are, as you establish yourself really well by doing X, people will notice you and may ask if you are also able to do Y and Z.  This will also help in your networking, as the other people here have pointed out.

    • #212099
      AvatarLaguna Hiker
      Member

      I'll reiterate the advice given earlier: Find people who need videography. Know any lawyers? Who records their depositions? Know any wedding planners? Who does their videography? Know any business owners who have to train new employees on the same stuff, over and over again? How much money could you save them by recording the training?

       

      Videographers don't generally get business through "videographer needed" want ads. They make a list of everyone they know, and they come up with a way to make those folks money through their videography, or to save it, the same way. Then go out to all those folks and start pitching! And ask each prospect for the names of three other people you can talk to.

       

      At the end of the day, it's a numbers game. You'll figure out pretty quickly how many calls you have to make to get a job. Two-thirds of your time will be spent pitching projects; if you're a people-person, it can be a lot of fun–the most fun part of the business. If you aren't a people-person, it will be very difficult to make a go of it in this business.

    • #214705
      AvatarMarkCGreer
      Member

      Biveo promotes video production to small business trade association members. If you specialize in producing small business marketing videos, it’s free to join their directory of videographers. You only pay a referral fee on completed projects. The rates you charge are up to you.

Viewing 7 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

homicide-bootstrap