3 lav mics into a usb mixer?

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    • #90757
      AvatarThebuz
      Member

      After googling for hours I am still stuck

      I am trying to achieve 3 lav mics fed into one usb mixer so I can record all of them (preferably on individual tracks) in Adobe Audition.

      Our environment isnt very good for a shotgun or boom mic with echo and background noise, its a friends restaurant which we use to record after hours, so I though lav mics would be the way to go?

    • #214182
      Avatarrs170a
      Participant

      The right choice of boom/shotgun is the way to go but more information is needed.
      Is this a band, an interview, something else?
      You can “tame” the echo by the use of sound absorbing material. Moving blankets (easily rented and a good size and simple to hang) is often recommended.

      Mike

    • #214192
      AvatarKevin Mc
      Member

      Actually, I think the lav mics would produce a better sound in the environment you described. The issue then comes down to the mixer. If it only feeds a stereo signal to the computer via usb, then you’re maxed out at two separate audio tracks. Do you know how many separate signals the mixer is capable of sending to the computer?

    • #214194
      palladini971palladini971
      Participant

      You computer can only take one audio feed, so knowing this you can
      A) Use 3 separate Digital Audio Recording devices, hook one lav mic to each device and record each Mic separately. Then transfer the audio file from each DAR to your computer and go from there.
      B) Get a 6 or 8 Channel Audio mixer that puts the main mix out through a cable you can plug into the Audio Jack on your computer, then have it feed the audio signal directly to your Program.
      B is what I have, it is an Audio Mixer, I can run multiple mics or instrument feeds into it,mix them, then send to any recording device, be a a computer or DAR.

    • #214202
      AvatarKevin Mc
      Member

      You can get external audio cards that will feed as many as 16 individual/separate tracks (possibly more) simultaneously to your computer via USB. I prefer having the ability to record and mix each track separately. This way, if there is a problem with one of the tracks, such as long hair brushing against the lav mic (been there, done that), it does not affect the other tracks. I’ve never been a fan of pre-mixing audio down to a couple of stereo channels, prior to recording. There’s just no room for mistakes, when doing it this way. You’re not able to boost one voice, without boosting all of them. Plus you are not able to equalize various vocal frequencies independently of one another. I use a Tascam US-1800 to record live music, and am able to mic up each instrument and vocals to record up to 16 separate tracks simultaneously, while running multiple camcorders, and syncing it all up in the end. The audio gets mixed in post. If one channel has issues, it can be dealt with, without messing with the audio from the other channels.

    • #214206
      Avatarrs170a
      Participant

      The drawback to using lav mics in a situation such as this is that most lav mics have an omni pickup pattern which means they pick up everything around them. Unfortunately this includes noise and echo. Been there, done that with my Sanken COS-11s which are one of the best models out there. With careful mic hiding techniques I can reduce but never totally eliminate the noise and echo. A lav with a cardiod pickup pattern or a head mounted mic like performers wear is a much better choice in this situation.
      Here’s a great article comparing a number of different lav mics.
      http://www.kenstone.net/fcp_homepage/lavs_brockett.html

      A Tascam DR-70D is my multi channel field recorder of choice. Under $300 and it supports up to 4 channels of mic or line level audio using XLR-1/4″ jacks.

      Mike

    • #302603
      AvatarKevin Mc
      Member

      ^^^->true story :). When I use lavs, I *always* have to process the audio through Adobe Audition’s Noise Reduction. Which works by locating a moment of silence, when no one is speaking. In that moment, the only audible sounds are ambient noise. It uses that as a template for the noise you wish to remove. It then removes that ambient sound sample across the entire track. I’m amazed at how well it preserves the remaining audio, while removing the noise.

      Just my 2 cents on the matter :)…

      –Kevin

    • #301847
      AvatarKevin Mc
      Member

      ^^^->true story :). When I use lavs, I *always* have to process the audio through Adobe Audition’s Noise Reduction. Which works by locating a moment of silence, when no one is speaking. In that moment, the only audible sounds are ambient noise. It uses that as a template for the noise you wish to remove. It then removes that ambient sound sample across the entire track. I’m amazed at how well it preserves the remaining audio, while removing the noise.

      Just my 2 cents on the matter :)…

      –Kevin

    • #301686
      AvatarKevin Mc
      Member

      ^^^->true story :). When I use lavs, I *always* have to process the audio through Adobe Audition’s Noise Reduction. Which works by locating a moment of silence, when no one is speaking. In that moment, the only audible sounds are ambient noise. It uses that as a template for the noise you wish to remove. It then removes that ambient sound sample across the entire track. I’m amazed at how well it preserves the remaining audio, while removing the noise.

      Just my 2 cents on the matter :)…

      –Kevin

    • #301487
      AvatarKevin Mc
      Member

      ^^^->true story :). When I use lavs, I *always* have to process the audio through Adobe Audition’s Noise Reduction. Which works by locating a moment of silence, when no one is speaking. In that moment, the only audible sounds are ambient noise. It uses that as a template for the noise you wish to remove. It then removes that ambient sound sample across the entire track. I’m amazed at how well it preserves the remaining audio, while removing the noise.

      Just my 2 cents on the matter :)…

      –Kevin

    • #214207
      AvatarKevin Mc
      Member

      ^^^->true story :). When I use lavs, I *always* have to process the audio through Adobe Audition’s Noise Reduction. Which works by locating a moment of silence, when no one is speaking. In that moment, the only audible sounds are ambient noise. It uses that as a template for the noise you wish to remove. It then removes that ambient sound sample across the entire track. I’m amazed at how well it preserves the remaining audio, while removing the noise.

      Just my 2 cents on the matter :)…

      –Kevin

    • #302791
      AvatarKevin Mc
      Member

      ^^^->true story :). When I use lavs, I *always* have to process the audio through Adobe Audition’s Noise Reduction. Which works by locating a moment of silence, when no one is speaking. In that moment, the only audible sounds are ambient noise. It uses that as a template for the noise you wish to remove. It then removes that ambient sound sample across the entire track. I’m amazed at how well it preserves the remaining audio, while removing the noise.

      Just my 2 cents on the matter :)…

      –Kevin

    • #302068
      AvatarKevin Mc
      Member

      ^^^->true story :). When I use lavs, I *always* have to process the audio through Adobe Audition’s Noise Reduction. Which works by locating a moment of silence, when no one is speaking. In that moment, the only audible sounds are ambient noise. It uses that as a template for the noise you wish to remove. It then removes that ambient sound sample across the entire track. I’m amazed at how well it preserves the remaining audio, while removing the noise.

      Just my 2 cents on the matter :)…

      –Kevin

    • #214632

      We do this all the time in our studio environment. We’ll have anywhere between three and five people on our talk-show set with wireless mics. Each mic is fed into out Presonus StudioLive board. We record each mic separately using Soundtrack Pro. Granted it’s not the exact same software, but if Audition will allow you to record multiple tracks at the same time, the Presonus is the key to getting all of your mics individually mixed and sent to be recorded. During a taping, I’m usually pretty good a riding the mics. But occasionally someone makes a comment that wasn’t expected and I have the individually recorded mic feeds to go back to.

      As far as mics go, I’m in the shotgun arena. They’re designed to reject off-axis sounds, whereas the lav is going to pick up more ambient noise.

      Good luck!
      Chris Sebes
      Senior Video Editor
      http://www.MediaMixStudios.com

    • #214641
      Avatarpaulears
      Participant

      Does your mixer support individual tracks – many cheaper USB mixers simply have a stereo output? So you can have two separate tracks, by panning two mics one left and one right, but not three. To do three needs a more sophisticated interface.

      Most important – what are you recording? As has been said, omnis close in are ok for a speech recording. Shotguns are great for some things, but need careful aiming, and of course are only directional at higher frequencies, so might work for your speech, but is that what you are recording, or is it music? After hours in a restaurant doesn’t sound very speech typical to me?

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