WHY ARE MIAMI FREELANCE EDITORS WORKING FOR LESS?

Videomaker – Learn video production and editing, camera reviews Forums General Video and Film Discussion WHY ARE MIAMI FREELANCE EDITORS WORKING FOR LESS?

Viewing 8 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #43316
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I am a freelance editor in Miami..and my hourly rate was or is40hr. last year it was lowered to 35.00 at a tv network…and now more production houses and local tv networks are only paying 25hr. Last week I was offered a gig and they only wanted to pay 20hr! I refused!! I am afraid that more editors take these positions and the rest of us are screwed! I don’t get it.

    • #181701
      Avatarbirdcat
      Participant

      I live in south Florida (Palm Beach County) and I think it boils down to three words – The economy sucks. In Florida more so than the most of the rest of the US (or at least it seems so to me & others I know).

      It also doesn’t help that folks from places like Craig’s List (some good, most no talent or skill) are undercutting professionals just to get a foot in the door.

      Often I have not been able to charge an hourly rate and was forced into quoting a fixed price model to get work.

    • #181702
      AvatarCraftersOfLight
      Participant

      Doing google searches for salaries of film/video editors in the US are showing average ranges of $32K-$58K/year and depends on market. Most current data as of Mar 11 2011.

    • #181703
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Well, I don’t even live in Florida and just two weeks ago I was able to secure a gig paying $55 hr for a Spanish Network Television there… Maybe you guys need to star marketing your self in a different way…

    • #181704
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      I think pricing/living/working in Florida WAS the point.

    • #181705
      AvatarGrinner Hester
      Participant

      The short answer, Alex:

      Because you agree to work for less than half rate. I so understand the fear in sticking to your guns. Often, I have to freelance for as little as 60 an hour. Why? Because on thos particular days I know that’s 60 an hour I otherwise would not have made. I don’t see it as canibalization. That’s rare though and for only select places that will benefit me later. Do I get offered half that all the dang time? Sure I do, we all do. It’s a matter of saying no thanks as it’s just not worth your time. I can’t tell you how much it stings when I’m in that house at 60 an hour and someone calls wanting to book me in my suite for my normal rate. It’s a gamble sometimes but again, when I do accept terms I’m not tickled with, I try to time so that it doesn’t actually cost me money. Don’t freelance for 25 an hour, man. Don’t even do it for 40. PLaces worth working for know industry standards and, often, they are not looking for average standards so they are happy to pay premium to get top notch talent. I can tell you this…. it;s far better to be known as the best in town than the cheapest in town.

    • #181706
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      Alex,

      It really comes down to how much do you think your time is worth? Normally, my rates are higher but I’ve been doing gigs for $30/hr for one outfit. However, they throw me regular gigs and they stay out of my way when I’m working. I also am working to build a presence with their outfit that no one else in the region could equal. That takes time. On the other hand, I’ve got other irons in the fire. In your case, if you’re paying for gear in addition to dealing with the usual business overhead those short money gigs may mean something gets paid for this month. The tough thing is to not make it a habit of doing short money gigs regularly. It’s like Grinner suggested, you’ll end up being known as the cheap one and not necessarily the best.

      These days, you have to do what you must to stay in the biz. The good news is; all of those craigslist weenies will have run themselves aground with trying to undercut established pro’s. Once all the suckers have been cleared out, it will be just the survivors left to grab the paying clients. Your job is to make sure you’re still on your feet when that time comes.

    • #181707
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      Unless the cheaper competition’s work is better, faster and overwhelmingly awesome compared to yours, you’ve nothing to worry about and should maintain your own personal level of fees based on your abilities and experience. If they ARE better, faster etc. then you need to assess where you are in the scheme of things and ramp up your production abilities or compete on price.

    • #181708
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I have no choice but to take it for 25hr. I have 15years experience. I know as a professional I should not be making half of what I’m worth but I’m low on income and all the jobs I run into here in miami have terrible paying rates. I’m waiting for a network to finally hire me full time but in the meantime I have to do what I can to survive. I don’t have the luxury of saying no to the job because I’m worth more. And that’s what’s happening with my colleagues here in Miami. An Editor Strike would Be amazing! But I don’t think it’s possible.. Or is it?

Viewing 8 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

Best cinema cameras — 2020

Determining the best cinema cameras on the market today can be complicated. Here are the first cameras you should consider
homicide-bootstrap