When is HD needed?

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #43777
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hi!

      I have filmed footage in 1080i using a Sony V1. The final edited film will be on a DVD to be used by a school to play on a monitor of some sort. It wont be more than 10 minutes long I guess. The problem is that I do not know what kind of monitor the film will be played back on.

      Because of this I have decided to cover my self by editing the film in HD using Vegas Pro.

      What size/ type of output monitor really demands HD? In other words, when does DV image quality visibly deteriorate? Maybe I am being too cautious doing all in HD?

      I imagine there are articles on this forum on optimising final rendering of film for different mediums such as web/ tv/ larger screens etc?

      Rgds
      Malcolm

    • #183477
      AvatarchrisColorado
      Participant

      What size/ type of output monitor really demands HD? In other words, when does DV image quality visibly deteriorate?

      That’s an interesting question. my 4th short film was shot on my(SD) Flash media camera which is a little bigger than my hand. I then ran it through After Effects(stablization andColor Correction) and Vegas(actual editing). Then burned to DVD. Then I entered it in alocal film festival.

      When I showed up that night in front of the big screen,it never occurred to me that my image might not be great. It was, oddly enough! I don’tremember any problems in video quality fromwatching my film on a big screen.The judges even said I had good image quality. Still didn’t win anything(long story), but the image quality was great from a camera no bigger than my hand aftergoing through two software and being burned to DVD. And this was all SD!

      Maybe I am being too cautious doing all in HD?

      Maybe. LOL!!!

      I imagine there are articles on this forum on optimising final rendering of film for different mediums such as web/ tv/ larger screens etc?

      Not that I know of right this minute, but go ahead and check around. You will find some useful and some interesting stuff.

      Here’s some quick tips: for DVD,render to mpeg2, for the web,render to whatever you need, mpeg 2 or wmv or avi or quicktime or whatever. You’ll use different formats depending on how compressed you need it. Avi is not all that compressed, but mpeg 2 can get really compressed.

      In answer to your top question, I don’t think HD is ever needed! SD is easier, faster and for what I’ve used it for, as good as HD.

    • #183478
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      as far as when HD is needed, I guess the simple answer is “when your client wants it”

      go ahead and edit the piece in HD and render out a SD product, you should be very pleased with the results.

      John

    • #183479
      Avatarjerronsmith
      Participant

      >>Here’s some quick tips: for DVD,render to mpeg2, for the web,render to whatever you need, mpeg 2 or wmv or avi or quicktime or whatever. You’ll use different formats depending on how compressed you need it.<<

      For the web there are really only a handful of different formats that will play in the browser well. Real Media, Windows Media, Quicktime, and Flash video all require there specific plugins to work. You could also embed mpeg video in a browser but since it isn’t a streaming format it has to fully download before you can watch it.

      >>Avi is not all that compressed, but mpeg 2 can get really compressed.<<

      This is a very common misconception. AVI is not a type of compression, it is a file format (the same is true for wmv, mov, etc.). You can have an AVI file that is lightly or heavily compressed, it depends. What determines the amount of compression on the media file is the codec (compressor/decompressor) used.

    • #183480
      Avatarhosenose29
      Participant

      Hey Jerron,

      So I’m even more of a newbie than the person who started this thread (I know, how annoying – sorry…lol
      ), but I’m hoping you (and anyone else that has some good advice) can help me out with some guidance.

      At our institution, we have a multi-media department, with a really competent, ultra-hip A/V guy. We are starting to film more and more video content, in the form of interviews and event coverage (like fundraising walks, etc.) for our web site. We are serving these videos up from our internal web server, not streaming them, wrapped in a thickbox skin. Some of these videos might be re-purposed also for burning onto a DVD for a promotional piece, or given to professional video producers for a longer-form program.

      The A/V guy is insisting that everything should be filmed in HD, which wouldn’t matter so much to us, except that he’s saying the editing and processing time involved in getting HD footage converted so that it can be used on the web takes a LOT of time, so the turnaround time on these projects is killing us.

      My question to you would be: what file formats / resolutions / bit rates, etc. do you recommend for online video? And is it necessary to shoot things that are only meant for online consumption in HD? Is there a visible difference online? Does it really take a huge amount of effort to convert HD footage into something fit for online consumption?

      Thanks for your input,

      Hosenose29

    • #183481
      AvatarIan
      Participant

      Broadcasting in HD has only just startedin our country and the sales of big screen 1080i flat panel TVs havereally taken off. Also now that the HD DVD / Bluerayissue has been settled, a lot of movies are being releasedon Blueray HD, so there is building a great awareness of the quality difference between SD and HD. And while SD video I havetaken in the past was way above analogue SD broadcast quality andoften equal to the best commercial DVD quality, the HD video I now take is a big step above that again.

      Just as when I watch analogue broadcast TV, and compare it to the HD digital TV we now get, after watchingthe HD video I can now produce, I wonder why I thought SD digital video was so good.

      Remember that if you shoot in HD it can always be rendered down to a lower definition, but if you start with SD, that is the best you will get.

      I guess at the end of the day, the answerdepends upon what you ultimately want to do with thevideo you have shot.

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

homicide-bootstrap