What to make sure I shoot at the wedding.

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    • #42481
      Avatarbrandon0409
      Participant

      At a wedding there are many things that the bride and groom will want to make sure are captured on video. I know that. I wanted your opinion on what should be the standard. What should I tell them when they walk in? What are some of the standard shots that you guys use?
      I want to be able to say: "These are the shots that will be in the video. These are standard. Anything else, make a list so we can be sure to get it."

      I have a long list of things like the obvious; video the bride comming down the isle, and first kiss, rings, etc.
      But I want to hear from the pros? The people who have been doing this for years who have the experience to say this is what I am always asked to get.
      I also want to know from amatures or even just regular people. What would you want to have in your video that CANNOT be left out?

      THanks

    • #178402
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      As always, Hanks not only swift to reply, but he’s also right πŸ˜›

      If you’re going to be doing your first wedding, and you’re not totally sure of youreslf, try to find a wedding to attend. Don’t crash the wedding, but if a friend or family member is getting married, or if your church is hosting a wedding and they have a big balcony that won’t be getting used, it always helps to "see" what you’re going to do.

      as Compusolver mentioned, at least three cams and three mics is best, and if you can get more, do it. I use three cameras and four mics, and I have a fourth camera if I feel that it will help, and even with that, sometimes I wish I had another (of course, that’s just my OCD speaking, that wished I had a shot from every possible angle in the room!), but alas, I have yet to find a bride, groom, or pastor that would wear a helmet cam at the service :-D.

      In our wedding packet we give couples, we have a sheet that we fill out with them to ask what shots they’d like us to try, what things will be special/important to them, and also to ask for their editing style likes and dislikes (for example, they might want the video edited like TLC’s "Wedding Story", or they might have some other styles they prefer in editing). It helps us know what they have in their mind for the finished product, so when they get it they won’t be disapointed.

      One other thing, never guarantee a particular shot to a couple. Tell them "These are the shots we always go for" or "This is what we typically try to get", but as soon as yu promise something you can’t guarantee, you’re going to get in trouble.

      For example, one couple I worked with really wanted a super closeup of their hands for the ring ceremony. At the rehearsal, I showed him the best way to hold her hand so I could get the shot, and told him where to stand. Everything was perfect, until the next day, at the ceremony. I got set up in my location to get the shot. Everything was going as it should. But then, when the groom was about to put the ring on the bride’s finger, in his wedding day nervousness, he shifted his position so that all I could see was his back. By the time I relocated, it was over. When I told them that I couldn’t get the shot, they were initially upset enough to even ask for a discount. Fortunately, when I explained the situation, they were forgiving and let things be.

      But the back of my contracts, which I always go over with the couple, houses legal crap that covers stuff like that. It says right on my contract that I do not guarantee any particular shot in a wedding. I’d suggest that if you’re going to "go pro" for weddings, that you get a lawyer to help you draft a legal disclaimer on your contract. At the very least, find a good premade statement online, and tailor it to your service. In the pro world, even at a happy event like weddings, there are scum out there who are looking for a way to get something for nothing, or worse, a way to get more than something for nothing, e.g. "I didn’t like the video, therefore I will not pay you AND I’m suing for damages! By the way, I’m keeping the video."

      Of course, if you’re just doing a wedding for friends or family, you don’t need to worry so much about that, but still make sure they know that you’ll do your best, but if something happens and you miss a shot, that’s just how it goes sometimes.

    • #178403
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Heh, sounds like we’ve got similar setups. I’ve got an old Digital 8 that we’ll pull out if we want to set up an unmanned camera someplace (usually onstage), or if the father of the bride (or someone else) wants to tote a camera around that could wind up in the finished video.

      If I’m feeling really OCD on getting as much sound as I can, I have a recording station that records 12 seperate tracks for up to 2 hours, and XLR splitters so I can tap into whatever mics they have in the house in addition to my own arsenal. I rarely use it all because of the setup time and having to convince the sound tech that I know what I’m doing, but when someone goes all out and asks for the best, they get it πŸ˜›

    • #178404
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Very true.

      I’ve been doing sound tech stuff for ages longer than I’ve done video. It’s probably my first technical passion. Seriously, I can remember the day I bought my first pro amp and mixing board better than most of the memories floating around in my head πŸ™‚

      The really nice thing about the multi-track recording unit I’ve got is that you can record 12 seperate tracks at the wedding, and then dump it all onto a stereo track for your video. It’s got a hardware interface that basicaly resembles a sound board, so if you have any experince in pro sound, it takes seconds to learn the extras.

      A friend and I went in together to buy it, as it was a bit pricey, but it’s well worth the expense. It’s literally a mini recording studio. It can even be plugged into a CD burner and burn your audio onto a CD, so you don’t have to conect the unit to your PC. Of course, if you do connect it to the pc via USB, you can do a lot af neat stuff.

      They also sell effects cards you can plug into these things, so if you want reverbe, flange, or whatever effects you might ever need, they’re built in. They’re more for audio production, but it works so well that I like to use it on video.

    • #178405
      Avatarkevinvideo
      Participant

      On a Roll Wrote:

      Very true.

      I’ve been doing sound tech stuff for ages longer than I’ve done video. It’s probably my first technical passion. Seriously, I can remember the day I bought my first pro amp and mixing board better than most of the memories floating around in my head πŸ™‚

      The really nice thing about the multi-track recording unit I’ve got is that you can record 12 seperate tracks at the wedding, and then dump it all onto a stereo track for your video. It’s got a hardware interface that basicaly resembles a sound board, so if you have any experince in pro sound, it takes seconds to learn the extras.

      A friend and I went in together to buy it, as it was a bit pricey, but it’s well worth the expense. It’s literally a mini recording studio. It can even be plugged into a CD burner and burn your audio onto a CD, so you don’t have to conect the unit to your PC. Of course, if you do connect it to the pc via USB, you can do a lot af neat stuff.

      They also sell effects cards you can plug into these things, so if you want reverbe, flange, or whatever effects you might ever need, they’re built in. They’re more for audio production, but it works so well that I like to use it on video.

      Hi, I am very new to the videography field and want to shoot wedding videos. Can you let me know what company makes your sound board and what is the make and model. Thanks.

    • #178406
      Avatarbrandon0409
      Participant

      I never thought of this, but…

      I see advertised many wireless units with a single receiver. If they aren’t mixed all in one, how do you record the live audio without mixing them?

      Is it to a separate sound board or something?

    • #178407
      Avatarbrandon0409
      Participant

      I am sorry for sounding like a broken record.

      Let me see if I got this straight.

      If I have a setup like you have, I could hook a receiver to one camera and record each mic to its own channel, on a MiniDV tape.

      Then when I go to download it to the computer, there will be separate tracks, or is there more to it than that? Will I need some sound editing software to separate the channel?

      Would it be practical to record one mic to each camera, for example if I had 2 mics and 2 camera or 3 mics and 3 cameras, etc.

    • #178408
      Avatarbrandon0409
      Participant

      How many mics do you usually have set to each camera.
      2?
      more than 2?

      If you have each mic set to its own channel, can you split more than 2 channels?

    • #178409
      Avatarbrandon0409
      Participant

      compusolver Wrote:

      We also use a digital recorder with two XLR inputs.

      Is all of this hardware connected to the camera? Is this basically your setup…

      Camera
      Adaptor with XLR ports connected to camera/digital recorder.
      Wireless mic receiver connected to XLR adaptor.

      Have you ever connected all of the wireless mics directly to mixing board and recorded directly to a digital recorder?

      Thanks again for all this info.

    • #178410
      Avatarbrandon0409
      Participant

      compusolver Wrote:

      When using two units like the Azden 100 series, we use a Beachtek adapter and plug each unit into its own channel (left/right). When using an Azden 200 etc., it automatically records each mic onto its own channel. So, either way preserves a separate track for each mic. You never want to mix tracks together, if you can avoid it, and if you can’t avoid it, you need a separate sound tech to run the mixing board.

      Disclaimer:
      I’m sorry to keep bringing this up. But I am trying to finalize what I need/want to buy. As you you have read from some of my other posts, I have been using digital voice recorders. I’d like to get wireless mics and be set. I like to just use the voice recorders when there is no other option, like in the local Greek Orthodox church (like I stated before) absolutely refused wireless except the one he is already wearing.

      Question:
      Above you stated that the Azden 200 automaticall records to individual channels and either way preserves a separate track for each mic.
      I have been looking at the Azden 200ULT package. What do you think?

    • #178411
      Avatarbrandon0409
      Participant

      What’s the difference in quality with the 100’s as opposed to the 200’s?

      Thanks for the info

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