What should I put on my wish list?

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    • #39001
      Avatarjd52mg
      Participant

      I’m a school counselor (midddle and high school) interested in having a video club after school.I want to write a grant to purchase equipment/software for video production. What should I put on my wish list if I have $5,000 to spend? I only have experience with Windows Movie Maker and have made about 10 videos. Where can I get more training?

    • #169199
      AvatarVideoman
      Participant

      I think it will depend what you want to do or what direction you want the club to take.
      Computer: I would suggest Pentium 4 3.0 Ghz as minimum, as much ram as you can afford – pref DDR 2 Gig min. Video card hmmmm…. depends on program. Suggest 128 meg on board memory and duel head out. Duel head is great for spreading the interfance over two monitors making it easier to work with.
      Definately minimum 2x SATA hard drives – Drive C for operating system and program, the other Drive D for capturing video, projects, rendering.
      Drive C I would look at 8o gig(min) Drive D – as big as you can – 300 gig would be good. I would use a motherbiard with inbuilt SATA hard drive control
      DVD burner – I don’t know price wise in US, but in OZ they are getting cheaper – Duel layer around $120. Single layer $75

      Program – this is the biggest debated issue around.
      Pinnacle Studio 10 – stay away from
      Pinnacle studio 9 plus – some have issues some useres like me do not.
      Studio range or equiv in the lower end programs are limited and do not allow for expansion, though some plug ins are available.

      Pinnacle Liquid Edition – Now Avid liquid7 – mixed reports – Many report lots of problems and are waiting for patches to fix. Steap learning curve

      Adobe premier pro – many people like this one. Heaps of plug ins, heaps of adobe intergrations available. Steap learning curve , but once mastered excellent program. Probably able to get educational discount on the program.

      Sony…. I have never used, though many people like … Sorry can’t tell you too much on this one.

      Other alternative is to use Imac system. I have never used, but have a friend who swears by it. Stable – never crashes. Still a learnig curve, but many professionals use it. Hey is it was good enough to create “Finding Nemo” it must be good.

    • #169200
      AvatarVideoman
      Participant

      I think it will depend what you want to do or what direction you want the club to take.
      Computer: I would suggest Pentium 4 3.0 Ghz as minimum, as much ram as you can afford – pref DDR 2 Gig min. Video card hmmmm…. depends on program. Suggest 128 meg on board memory and duel head out. Duel head is great for spreading the interfance over two monitors making it easier to work with.
      Definately minimum 2x SATA hard drives – Drive C for operating system and program, the other Drive D for capturing video, projects, rendering.
      Drive C I would look at 8o gig(min) Drive D – as big as you can – 300 gig would be good. I would use a motherbiard with inbuilt SATA hard drive control
      DVD burner – I don’t know price wise in US, but in OZ they are getting cheaper – Duel layer around $120. Single layer $75

      Program – this is the biggest debated issue around.
      Pinnacle Studio 10 – stay away from
      Pinnacle studio 9 plus – some have issues some useres like me do not.
      Studio range or equiv in the lower end programs are limited and do not allow for expansion, though some plug ins are available.

      Pinnacle Liquid Edition – Now Avid liquid7 – mixed reports – Many report lots of problems and are waiting for patches to fix. Steap learning curve

      Adobe premier pro – many people like this one. Heaps of plug ins, heaps of adobe intergrations available. Steap learning curve , but once mastered excellent program. Probably able to get educational discount on the program.

      Sony…. I have never used, though many people like … Sorry can’t tell you too much on this one.

      Other alternative is to use Imac system and Final cut pro. I have never used, but have a friend who swears by it. Stable – never crashes. Still a learnig curve, but many professionals use it. Hey is it was good enough to create “Finding Nemo” it must be good.

    • #169201
      AvatarCaptured-Films
      Participant

      Sony Vegas is a very good program. I have been using it for about 6 months now and really like it. It has a very professional feel to it. I takes a little while to learn it, but well worth the time. I used to use pinnacle 9 and didnt like it. It worked decently but feels more like a beginners program and would crash often. http://www.academicsuperstore.com has very prices on many editing programs including vegas and many other things. Hope that helps.

      Nick

    • #169202
      Avatari43Productions
      Participant

      do you have any camcorders? if not, that should be your #1 priority. you might be able to “borrow” a decent computer from another part of the school to edit on (or multiple comps) but you’re up a stream without a camera or two. since you’re looking to START a video club, i’d say you need to worry more about getting started than getting high-level editing gear. despite what videoman said about the editing comp (which i agree on the specs IF you’re going to be doing some serious editing) you Don’t need that much computer right now. i’m doing a lot of work on a dual Pentium 3 system with 1.5Gb of RAM…WELL below his stated specs but you know, it fits the needs i have right now for my freelance work.

      let’s break down your $5000 budget here to try to get some prioritizing of your needs/expenses:

      so $5000…

      figure about $2000 for cameras (i’m assuming you have to include tax so we shouldn’t look for cameras that hit exactly at the $1000 mark) so figure something in the $800 range. There are a pretty good number of inexpensive cameras in that range that would all fit your needs. make sure to go for MiniDV, not any of those others like microMV, DVD or hard-drive based. those are still too new and not good enough quality to live up to a good DV cam.

      you might want to go with a single camera with better quality. in this case, go with a Canon GL-2, the Panasonic AG-DVC30 has been very well reviewed on this site, and the Sony PDX-10 as well. these offer high-quality and would familiarize your students with better quality camera features as well.

      so the other $3000 needs to be split among editing hardware, software, tripod, tripod head, tapes, and other possibilities.

      Tripod legs: Bogen / Manfrotto 3046 Tripod Legs are $217 on B&H
      Tripod head: Bogen / Manfrotto 3433 (501) Pro Video Head (Quick release) is $142 at B&H…i have this head and it’s a great, professional fluid head, essential to quality shooting. legs need to be strong and solid and those look like they’ll fit your needs.

      lighting is something you’ll need to think about. a cheap way to start is reflectors. you can get reflectors from B&H from around $30 and up. definitely a good investment to start the kids thinking about lighting.

      editing software, you can get educational discounts for your software so obviously you’ll want to make the most of that. i’ve gotten some stuff educational through journeyed.com and it works well. you’ll save a ton that way too.

      as far as actual software. i’d reccomend Adobe Premiere Pro. it’s a solid and (relatively) easy to use program that’ll teach the kids a lot about editing and other stuff like that. you might want to see about gettting Adobe Photoshop as well for some minor graphics use.

      for the computer, get the best you can with the money you have left. the essential part is getting plenty of RAM for it. RAM will make it run a lot smoother. if you buy a Dell or something, don’t buy the RAM through them, you can buy it cheaper elsewhere and have someone put it in for you. it’ll save a lot of money that way.

      make sure to have plenty of tapes as well. you can get good bulk rates at B&H on a lot of different tapestock. you’ll need MiniDV, obviously, but make sure you go for at least mid-range tapes, not the absolute cheapest.

      training is a bit different. this is something that you might be able to get a bit more creative with. look in the phonebook and see if there are any video production companies in your area. you might be able to call them and have them help you out free-of-charge. you might even be able to get them to have someone come over and teach all your kids or help out with the club. i know there are plenty of video professionals out there who are willing and excited about the prospect of teaching others about this profession. i’d do it, but most likely i’m nowhere near where you are.

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