What is the most durable camcorder

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    • #42183
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I need to buy new cameras for a highschool video production program.
      I would like to stick with full size VHS, 1. to eliminate the need to dub up for playback and 2. kids don’t steal big cameras.
      However since VHS cameras are hardly available and knowing that I may as well be checking them out to gorillas, what models should I look at?

    • #177534
      AvatarDaveC
      Participant

      That is a problem. I tried to buy a full size VHS camcorder for our Church a couple of years ago and found out they weren’t made anymore, unless you get into Prosumer line of Panasonic camcorders. These were well out of our budget.

      Perhaps you should go for CHEAP! Get a dozen $300 Sony TRV280 Digital8 camcorders. Require your students to bring their mothers jewelry or maybe the keys to their cars that fill your parking lots, to hold as collateral? They also have analog composite outputs on them so just plug them into your TV monitors for viewing and forget about dubbing to VHS? Maybe your editing equipment is VHS so dubbing would be required? But a school would probably have computers for editing so the firewire port on these 280’s would be just the ticket for getting the DV into and out of your computers? Hi8 tapes are around $4 I think and they run for 60 minutes.

      Maybe the $350 TRV480 would be a better choice? It has analog inputs for allowing VHS analog video to be recorded on D8 tape or passed through its firewire port to the computer. It would also allow your computer edited video to be passed back to a VHS VCR for recording if need be. The 480 can also play analog recorded 8mm and Hi8 tapes but that probably isn’t a feature you need?

      I don’t think anything made these days is durable. Cheap and disposable is the order of the day.

      Dave

    • #177535
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks for the reply
      The disposable idea could work if the cameras come out of my budget but since the department will be buying these they will want to keep up with the condition of them for a few years.
      I was thinking about VHSc because the first semester kids often submit raw footage or do in camera edits. this would allow them to use the adapter for playback. Also DV quality is secondary for these kids, they are working on basic techniques etc.
      Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    • #177536
      AvatarDaveC
      Participant

      VHS-C strikes me about the same way as kissing my sister (if I had one). I suppose it would work but “better you than me” to be the one that has to implement the plan.

      Not sure that it would really help in the budget area. Can you buy new VHS-C camcorders for less than $300 (TRV280 list price)? Just because the 280 has a low price it doesn’t mean that it would be any more fragile than a VHS-C camcorder?

      So the kids get to take the tape home but not the camcorder? If that is the case then I guess VHS-C has some merit? Seems like a shame to be spending good money on VHS-C in this day and age. I think I have to barf!

      Dave

    • #177537
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I have a SVHS-C camcorder (JVC GR-SX22E) which I bought new 2 years ago and it never fails me. Compared to my other camcorder (a Samsung Hi8) it’s much better and I really don’t care about the LCD screen the Samsung has. I capture my footage onto the computer, edit and then make a DVD or a VHS.
      But anyway, my advice is buy SVHS-C camcorders, it’s still good looking analog video and easy to edit even without a NLE computer, since lots of your students may have SVHS VCRs at home. Just use the provided adapter to make it easy, but don’t cut on quality.

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