Wedding Videographer Certification?

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    • #39676
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      Kind of ruined the effect there lol. X-D

    • #171243
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      I have never been interested in joining WEVA because (and pardon me if this seems prideful) I didn’t want to be associated with just any cut rate videographer with a membership (since they let just anyone join). I was wondering if anyone knew of any organizations that actually certify you as a qualified wedding videographer?

    • #171242
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      Update: I found this site. It seems to be the only thing like that. They seem to be pretty picky too (which is a good thing). If anyone else knows of any others like this I would like to know:
      http://www.weddingvideodoneright.com/

      Sounds like a good deal though.

    • #171244
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I don’t know…..what do you think Compusolver???
      are they any good?
      hehehe!javascript:emoticon(”)

    • #171245
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hey all,

      I thought the aim of WEVA and local organizations are to improve the general knowledge and bring more to the community as a whole by learning from others in the profession. I don’t belong to WEVA at this time, June 2007, but I’m a member of my local video organization. I like the fact that even the fresh to high end traditional video capture guys like me can exchange knowledge so I can share what I know about the web and online video and gain back knowledge about capturing light from hardware.

      I tend to think the future of creating and selling video will be more about sharing between people who bring their strengths, and it won’t be a small set of experts who keep to themselves. Not true?

      ============================
      virtualscribe
      http://www.sharingourjoy.com

    • #171246
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      I do agree with you but I don’t see paying money to learn what I can learn for free. I learn by observation. I’m always learning new things from others. There’s nothing wrong with joining WEVA for that reason. I simply meant that it would be nice to be associated with "qualified" videographers because, let’s face it, the majority of WEVA videographers is anything but qualified. If they are accomplishing that goal of "improve the general knowledge and bring more to the community as a whole" then why are there so many bad videographers out there? I guess I’m just frustrated because when I talk to someone about video, they assume that my product is just like any other out there and no better than uncle Bob can do. I would like that to change. I’m not saying I’m against WEVA and I didn’t mean offense to WEVA members at all, it’s just not worth it to me.

    • #171247
      Avatarfaqvideo
      Participant

      Wedding Video Business is about the word of mouth. If you think you are making a difference, then the customers will actually notice the difference and spread the word. If you are interested in formal certification, have a look at journalism school or course.

    • #171248
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I do agree with faqVideo, any business is about word of mouth. Because of my background in creating online solutions I see that the next decade will give back a lot more revenue by reducing the filesize and quality to push content online to people who want it than getting a certification. You Tube gets a lot of visitors, not because of their quality, but because of their ease of access. With pro videographers, the content produced can $MOKE anything on youTube, and a small percentage of the bride/groom’s resulting visitors who see the entire video produced at the videographers’ website will begin considering a video purchase, if the content and ease of reaching it is that good.

      I have to admit, as a web developer I can’t understand why more wedding videographers are not putting their full video online. We have all seen the paper and audio industries go through this phase, where putting content online gets more viewers. I’ve built online video solutions and the kids who are getting married are very happy to get me to transcode video from their videographer, of their whole wedding video online; but why is it that videographers won’t put it up themselves?

      Yes, you have the challenge of compressing to a quarter screen, but getting 250-500 people viewing this content online and chatting in a guestbook under the video will generate more business without any hesitation. I don’t get why it’s easier for me to sell this solution to the kids just getting married than to videographers who have been in the industry for decades.

      Customers can’t make the difference if they are not allowed to see the content. Charging a per ticket cost for reproducing half a dozen DVDs at $15/DVD is nothing compared to gaining half a dozen clients at the normal wedding rates because they saw and commented on the entire video. Not clips, not small portions, the full piece. Let whoever wants to purchase a DVD do it from the website, but give full access to the wedding party. You can track what your consumers are doing a lot better, you can let them post comments in the guestbook to their hearts’ content, so that they evite more people to watch the video. Password protect it, if the wedding couple want, give one DVD to the wedding couple, but get real leads by showing full content online.

      I suspect the push to get incrementally higher quality from VHS to DVD to HD is holding back the content producers from letting their creativity freely into the hands of people who want to consume it. Pro videographers hate reducing quality to get video online, because it just doesn’t meet their standards. But for wedding video I still believe that there much more money will be made by allowing the wedding party to share video online with 500 people than by getting slightly better quality and serving it up on a silver disk, watchable by 2-5 people at a time.

      At this point I should disclaim I believe so strongly in this that I am pushing my online web development skills in this direction.

      ============================
      virtualscribe
      http://www.sharingourjoy.com

    • #171249
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      Interesting thoughts. The wheels in my head are turning as we speak. I have always been a proponent of low cost distribution to gain new clients. I generally tell couples they can have as many copies of the video as they want. I have also always served the highlight video on a webpage for friends to see. I think the most hits there have been on one of those pages is about 85. I’ve never given much thought to supplying the entire video because I assumed there would be nobody interested in spending an hour watching a video of a wedding they’ve either been to already or weren’t close enough to the couple to attend anyway. So, it seems to me the figure of 500 viewers of the video is way optimistic. I would love to hear any arguments against me though. If this really is a good idea, I don’t want to miss out. Bandwidth is not a problem for me at all so I may give it a try starting with my next job as a test marketing thing.

      I wasn’t trying to say that getting "certified" will necessarily get me any additional business. Really, my point was that videographers have a bad reputation because there are so many bad ones out there. I just want that to change, that’s all.

      By the way, nice site. Looks really good.

    • #171250
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Endeavor,

      I agree that there are a lot of people entering the market because the barriers to entry are getting lower. Amazing video capture devices are coming out, inexpensive editing equipment, and anyone who can afford it can now be hired to capture content.

      As a web developer, I try to understand user behavior. And what I’ve found is that users who are allowed to create their own content bring other users with them. For example, this videomaker website probably gets an amazing hit count, let’s pretend 85 because of its writers. Now let’s say that it had a forum where people were allowed to speak to each other about what interests them. By looking at the counts on the forums, you can see thousands of hits. Not everyone is talking about writers content, but it drives content consumers like us to this website. Sometimes I look at the forums. Other times I read what the amazing writers here are covering. I am sure it goes both ways; I think writers of the magazine can get ideas about trends by sampling what’s on these forums, and then get creative by writing articles in the magazine and giving it to their print readers. This in turn drives more traffic to their website.

      Similarly with video, the focus by content producers is too narrowly on, "no one is going to watch 2 hours of content, so I’m not going to put it up there". This comes from the one way method of viewing content from pre web days. But add a guestbook to get a 2 way method of watching and commenting exactly under the video using web 2.0 AJAX techniques. That’s where you update the section of only the guestbook while video plays, without refreshing the whole page. This means that even when someone adds a comment, only the comments section updates, the video keeps playing undisturbed. Then for your video instead of just people viewing video in a one way situation like DVD, they begin interacting. Like on this website. One person comments online, "Hey, check out time 1 hour, 25 minutes", someone else responds, "Nice Dress", and eventually by enough people responding to each other on the web, more people make each other aware of details others may have missed when they first watched the video. They come back to watch it again. Your content, which you track, is being consumed by people who want it. They market it for you with the tools you give them.


      video
        |
        |
        |         AJAX update this, keep video running
      comments <----------------------------------------> users

      I know as videographers the quality of video produced is most important. But to your users their comments about your video is just as important. Video brings in the initial people. Then the comments magnetically bring in more. Yes, 500 views is optimistic. But check out your kids’ or grandkids’ mySpace profiles. Check out their faceBook profiles. They have more online friends than real friends, at times these online friends number in the thousands. These online friends are people they will never see in real life. These are people you would never reach with silver disk based media. And by allowing them to interact with each other they come back to the site like we’re coming back to read and post more here. And they watch more video. Some of them get the idea that pro video is worth the expense. But the online video viewing crowd will never get it unless the professionals get started doing this. Peers of mine in their 30s and 20s don’t watch media on television or disk anymore. They watch most of their content on a computer because of this 2 way method of commenting on what they are watching while they watch it.

      I know, because I sell this solution. I’ve thought through the process and fine tuned it. It works. I’ve built a business of transcoding videographers wedding video, password protection, creating the guestbook, and generating stats for each consumer. It works because of amazing video. The video attracts initial users. The missing piece pro videographers forget about is the user generated comments about WHY they are being hired in the first place. Video is something people are proud of and the audience WANTS to share. They do this by making comments in an online guestbook. After a few people have commented on the events, the amazing stuff goes on in the commentary. They speak about their lives, people they once knew, relationships long forgotten. And they keep coming back to consume the content. There’s stats you can create and build directly inside your online player that you would never be able to get with DVD. Like how many times and where people pause. Or how often they click to certain timecodes; how often they skip certain sections; which sections they skip; how much total time they have watched. All this is not Big Brother trying to follow users everywhere, it gets the videographer to finetune his/her skills during future edits. Let your users decide what to watch, don’t decide for them. And then by looking at the stats you can optimize your future video process because you have your own real stats to go by, from consumers watching your own content, not what some other pro tells you works. After you’ve seen how users respond to 20 videos you create, you have more of an understanding for how your users consume your content.

      And don’t be fooled by the process, Endeavor; some users will stop by just to see your video content. A lot more will stop by if you allow them to voice their thoughts and read their peers’ thoughts. So yes, your next test market case for online video might bring in some users. But give thought to the whole process. Create a great user experience for your visitors. No distractions on the viewing page. AJAX guestbook access. Flash video to accomodate the widest range of windows and mac users. Build stats into your videoplayer so you can see the finer points of your user behavior. If you want to battle the inexperienced videographers, THIS is the way to do it. Let your amazing content speak for itself and let your consumers share. Don’t just give away video, give your consumers a reason to stay and the tools to bring more people in to consume your video.

      If you don’t know how to do this, hire me to do it for you. $100 for the whole process, per consumer account. Resell it to your customer for $200. I guarantee it’s less for the whole process outsourcing to a web developer like me because I’ve thought through the online process which gives back to the appropriate content producers and consumers. Or do it yourself. Learn a whole bunch doing it. Save yourself $100 per account and you can learn everything you wanted to know about AJAX, browser compatibility, transcode times, codecs, online video compression, and the best content delivery networks to optimize bandwidth.

      Despite the marketing hype of HD, consumers are not going to pay more for slightly higher quality media on expensive one way next generation disk based HDDVD/Blu-Ray media. The future of making money creating video is not by differentiating through certification programs. It lies in showing a mass audience online why your content is better than everyone else. Even if it is smaller and more compressed online. The secret is ease of access, not highest quality. Get them to talk it up by giving your audience the video AND the tools to talk it up. The experienced videographer who shows his or her entire piece to the masses online makes it very obvious why video is important. But by providing tools and letting the audience promote it, future sales are much more likely. The difference also is that anyone can put up their entire video online today in a web browser. Get people to share, talk it up, comment, and generate useful stats. The HD crowd is talking up something which is super expensive today but will be mass market in 3-5 years. Until that time I’m working on my business right now, I’m doing all of the above today and making money doing it.

      ============================
      virtualscribe
      http://www.sharingourjoy.com

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