Wedding this weekend – HELP FAST PLEASE

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    • #36749
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hey guys, this might get wordy, but please respond. I really need help.

      I am a beginner at this but have been doing my homework. I have beed shooting some video and doing editing but this is my first wedding. This is a friends wedding that I will be using to gain experience and hopefully produce something that warrants me charging for this in the future.

      I know what you are going to say…. the couple should be hiring a professional instead of letting me do this. Well they are… sort of. They hired a guy but it doesn’t sound like he really knows what he’s doing. He’ll be using one camera, no mics etc. They are letting me do this as well to give me the experience and hoping that I will be able to come up with something good.

      So that being said, I plan to use 2 cameras. One good 3ccd camera and one consumer grade digital camera that will be stationary. I plan to use 1 wirless mic on the groom, the mic on the cameras for surround audio and am considering setting up a recording device connected to the church PA system. So here are my questions….

      1. Where should I stand for the entry, vowels, exit etc.?
      2. Should I tape continously with the 3ccd camera? I assume that I will need to walk around the church to get both the bride and groom’s faces.
      3. How much should I move around, without being an eye sore?
      4. Any other tips would really be appreciated.

    • #163309
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Well first of all youre going to notice a BIG difference in picture quality by using the two different cameras. You should see if you can rent another 3 chip like the one you got.

      As far as your first question, its hard to tell exactly where you should go because I dont know what kinds of angles are available. If you want to do the job right you need to go to the rehearsal so that you can see how the ceremony will go down. THAT IS VERY IMPORTANT! If you dont, youll have no clue where to go or what to do and I guaranty you will be out of position somewhere along the line. Anyway there could be several ways but generally speaking you need to try and get a good angle of the couples faces. At least the person who is saying their vows at the time. I usually use 3 cameras when I do a job and for the vows I like to have one camera on each the bride and the groom so in post you can bring it all together. Hopeully you’er using good tripods too. If you’re banking on holding the camera the whole time it just won’t work. It will look like a cheap home movie.

      Regarding your second question, I personally leave all my cameras running no mater what Im doing during a ceremony. Its just easier and faster for me to sync up in post. Remember that if you have two cameras going, you always have a way to edit out the movement from relocating the one camera by covering that up with your other camera. Youll never get in trouble as long as both cameras arent moving at the same time or one pukes out on you. You mentioned that this other guy is just using one camera I hope hes not getting paid for that job!

      For your third question here again it all depends on the setting. You really shouldnt have to move around too much if you have good vantage points. During the ceremony, pan shots with your cameras is usually all you need. Since you have one stationary camera you should be able to pan the crowd, the minister, the organ player and so fourth with the camera you’re running so that you have footage for j-cut edits in post. This always helps in breaking up a long scene. Otherwise it could get boring. Make sure you take all your b-roll stuff before the ceremony starts and after its over. I always sit in the still shooters back pocket afterwards to catch various opportunities for post ceremony b-roll. KEY POINT! Shoot a lot of film Shoot everything and anything because you only have one shot at this. It just gives you more options in post.

      There is a whole slew of other tips as well but I need to hit the sack. Im sure other guys will chime in too. The best way to get a feel for doing weddings is to go on the INET and look for posted wedding demo clips. This well help tremendously in giving you ideas as to how its done.

      Good luck!

      RAM

    • #163310
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks for the help guys…. by the way, I am going to the rehearsal. That was never a question. I know that is a must, ESPECIALLY for a beginner.

      A couple more questions….

      1. Should I move around with the good camera to get good close ups of both the bride and groom while they say their vowels, or just stay stationary off to the right as suggested by Hank? Would I even have enough time to move from one side of the church to the other between the two of them?

      2. Has anyone used a studio condensor mic on a stand anywhere in the service? This type of mic is designed to pick up everything, so I was thinking it might be a good way to pick up the audience etc.

      3. Has anyone tried to hook up some type of recording device to the church PA. I am considering hooking up something, even if it is only a cassette player to the PA for back up audio and musical guests.

      4. Can you give me 3 or 4 of the most important things that I need to pay attention to while working the camera. I know that I should check the White Balance at every location, and use a tripod…. but what else do you think?

    • #163311
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      compusolver Wrote:

      Hey, RAM (Video-maniac) – what do you charge for an outdoor December wedding up there?

      X-D

      Wow! That’s a scary thought… We can get crazy here in Wisconsin but I havent come across anyone that crazy… yet anyway! Although me wife begs to differ. She tells me to look in a mirror and Ill see crazy.

      I suppose I would double my normal price, get my partner and hopefully some other poor sucker to shoot it while I look though the window inside next to the fireplace sipping on a hot cup of coffee. Of course if it was a late afternoon or early evening wedding I would be sippin on a Manhattan with olives instead. X-D

    • #163312
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      mward77095 Wrote:

      1. Should I move around with the good camera to get good close ups of both the bride and groom while they say their vowels, or just stay stationary off to the right as suggested by Hank? Would I even have enough time to move from one side of the church to the other between the two of them?

      2. Has anyone used a studio condensor mic on a stand anywhere in the service? This type of mic is designed to pick up everything, so I was thinking it might be a good way to pick up the audience etc.

      3. Has anyone tried to hook up some type of recording device to the church PA. I am considering hooking up something, even if it is only a cassette player to the PA for back up audio and musical guests.

      4. Can you give me 3 or 4 of the most important things that I need to pay attention to while working the camera. I know that I should check the White Balance at every location, and use a tripod…. but what else do you think?

      Regarding question #1: Moving around will probably cause a distractions. If you did… just do it once but youll probably have to be quick about it. You dont have to be on top of them. Use your zoom. NO DIGITAL ZOOM! Heres what I do. After the ceremony, usually there is a time set aside for the still shooter. Hell setup poses and its here where you can move around and get in there for those moving “tight” shots. Then all you do is edit that in with the ceremony shots. No one will know except you and youll look like a super shooter.

      #2: I cant help you there. I usually use wireless lavalieres and handhelds. Lavalieres on the bodies and the handhelds on stands for general background.

      #3: I cant help you here either. Personally I stay away from coming right off a PA system. It takes away from the total ambiance of the wedding. If the PA is set up right, the sound from the speakers is usually sufficient. I rather depend on my wireless arrangement.

      #5: Always pan smoothly! Always zoom slow and smooth. Always make sure youre aware of changing light conditions. Churches can be the worst places to video when it comes to lighting. Make sure you have headphones so that you can confirm that the sound is right.

      As I said earlier the best way is to do a Google search for wedding videography and click on some of the various business websites. Most of them have online examples of all aspects of a wedding. Learn from there and you will know what to do during your first attempt.

      RAM

    • #163313
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      mward77095,

      Well you asked for a quick responce and you got it. A “crash course” none the less. All of this should come in handy.

      Good luck and may your camera always stay focused!

      RAM,

      PS: Hank, should you or I send “mward77095” the bill? X-D

    • #163314
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Can you guys give me tips on setting the exposure? Is there a safe setting setting that I can use, etc.?

      Also, help me a little with depth of field shots? I know that I want to do some of these.

    • #163315
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Good luck, man. Search this forum for more wedding related topics. There’s a bunch of threads here and there with great info, and the guys that have already posted here are pros at this stuff. My only addition (if it wasn’t already mentioned) is to get a close up of a fake ring exchange after the ceremony during pictures to add to your video. It’s a nice touch that’s often overlooked.

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