Wedding Editing … Where to begin?

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    • #49647
      AvatarTim_Hughes_TX
      Participant

      Hello all. I just filmed my first wedding, I had 2 cameras, SD and HD πŸ™ . I am uploading the sd one to my macbook for editing on iMovie, and am running into problems. I have to purchase the firewire cable for transfer; is there anything else I may need for it?

      Also, I captured about 5-6 hours of footage, any recommendations on how to begin such a project? I am trying to have a clean, professional DVD done within one month. Tips on how to approach this in the least tedious way would be highly appreciated!

      Thanks!

      Tim

    • #203161
      AvatarJackWolcott
      Participant

      Well, the typical story has a beginning, a middle and an end; so does the wedding. This doesn’t imply a linear telling of the story, but it does suggest that you need to find a good starting point, develop the story from there, either in a linear manner or through carefully selected flashbacks, and end decisively.

      For example, you could start with the bride and groom dressing for the ceremony, show the ceremony and events at the reception, and end with the couple driving off into the night. Or you could start with the first dance of the bride and groom at the wedding, flash back to the two of them getting ready for the service, etc., and end with the bride’s younger sister catching the bouquet, suggesting that this family and its rituals will continue for some time to come.

      To do this with 5-6 hours of footage, there a couple of tried and true methods of dealing with the material. Some sit and watch all of the footage from each camera, logging it as it passes by. This has the advantage of getting you into the flow of the event as well as letting you select shots that you think you’ll use in the edit. It also takes a good bit of time although for me, on large projects, I find it to be time well spent.

      Another approach, however, is to create bins (folders) for each event in the wedding: e.g., getting dress- bride and groom; bride walking down aisle; musicians in church performing, etc. You’ll end up with lots of bins, from which you can extract shots of each moment form each camera quickly.

      To pull it all together, consider how you want to tell the story — that’s the most important factor — then start putting clips on the timeline that do the telling. Once the story is told visually you can decide how you want to create your sound track. To this end you may find the article at http://www.videoccasions-nw.com/sound_design.html to be of interest.

      Have fun working on your project. And remember, story is everything.

      Jack

    • #203162
      Luis Maymi LopezLuis Maymi Lopez
      Participant

      In my honest opinion a project of that scale is quite challenging to edit with iMovie. The first thing you need to do is media management. View and separate all your clips in specific folders, such as “reception”, “church” and so on. Create a folder called “trash” to put footage that are unusable and a folder called “b-roll” (I hope you record a lot of b-roll, this are life savers). After you have all this clips organized start editing the wedding by parts. For example, edit the reception in one project, the church clips in another and so on. After you edit them separately join them together in one project and export that to DVD. Keep your project organized and you should finish in a month, although be prepared to encounter more problems with iMovie.

    • #203163
      AvatarTim_Hughes_TX
      Participant

      Thanks very much for the feedback guys, I’m about to start and the folder idea is brilliant! I think that will help out alot. If and when I run into more questions I will definitely ask!

    • #203164
      Avatarbirdcat
      Participant

      You also need to choose what type of story you want to tell.

      There are various types (times will vary by editor – these are my definitions):

      Teaser/Trailer – 3-5 Minutes

      Highlights – 10-20 Minutes

      Short Form – 30-60 Minutes

      Long Form – 60-180 Minutes

      Anything more than 3 hours needs more selective editing IMHO.

    • #203165
      AvatarTim_Hughes_TX
      Participant

      wheres the best place to get a firewire cable/adapter?

      -Tim

    • #203166
      Luis Maymi LopezLuis Maymi Lopez
      Participant

      You can get firewire cables from BH Photo Video. You can also check Ebay, but be careful from who your buying the cable.

    • #203167
      Avatarvid-e-o-man
      Participant

       Tim, when I have hours of video to sort and organize, I begin by previewing in camera. I fast forward through the clips looking for any that I certainly won’t use and I delete them. Then a system of organizing them as suggested in the other posts will help. If you have a little time, I would suggest that you checkout the link in jackwolcott’s post. Sometimes, as you are sorting through the clips, ideas will appear that will give you a direction to proceed. Let the video make itself if possible! In the link, you will see how this process can happen. Don’t stress relax and enjoy the process.

    • #203168
      AvatarTim_Hughes_TX
      Participant

      Hey guys, just figured I would share some of the setbacks I am having with the video itself. The bride and groom were extremely camera shy, and I have no interviews with them. On top of that, the grooms parents did not want to say anything to the camera either! The only interview I got of any parents was the brides mother, but my mic was turned off! I know I “have to work with I’ve got” but I’m somewhat freaking out about it, because it’s my first “breakthrough” wedding and I want it to be awesome. Any suggestions?

      -Tim

    • #203169
      AvatarJackWolcott
      Participant

      I wouldn’t worry about it very much. The bride and groom want to see 1) themselves getting married; 2) a reminder of how much fun they had during the reception; and 3) all the things their guest did that they couldn’t see.

      You did your best; you got what you could. Interviews are often difficult to get, if not impossible, on the day of the wedding. Everyone is too busy or too preoccupied. That’s why wedding videographers often shoot interviews a couple of days before the wedding, perhaps after the rehearsal or at the rehearsal dinner. And if guests and family choose to be uncooperative, you really can’t do a thing about it.

      Do the best editing you can with what you have in hand. Focus on the bride and groom, with cut away shots of their guests and family, and they’ll love it! The b-roll is often the most appreciated by the bride and groom since they often have little idea of what’s going on beyond their immediate field of vision.

      You’ll be o.k., and you’ve learned what to look out for next time. Good luck.

      Jack

    • #203170
      AvatarTim_Hughes_TX
      Participant

      Good point! That helps out alot. I appreciate it Jack!

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