Video Storage

Viewing 9 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #39439
      Avatarleonlacourt
      Participant

      Hi guys, which brand and model of external hard drive that support triple interface (firewire 800-400 and usb 2.0) and also can be configurated as RAID 0-1 do you recommend? I was looking at LaCie and G-Raid. i have only 500 hundred dollars for it. I just want about 500 GB of space for footage and keep it safe. Thanks

    • #170444
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Best bet is to back up your raw footage to DVD. That’s what I plan on doing.

      Hard drives get full, and what do you do at that point.

      Of course you can always consider hot-swap drives, but you’re less likely to lose the data if it’s on a DVD.

    • #170445
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      elderban Wrote:

      Best bet is to back up your raw footage to DVD. That’s what I plan on doing.

      Hard drives get full, and what do you do at that point.

      Of course you can always consider hot-swap drives, but you’re less likely to lose the data if it’s on a DVD.

      Huh?? 😯

      I guess it all depends on how big your projects are.

      If I were to backup all my DV AVI raw footage to DVD, I would need a million and one disks and a lot of time on my hands. I believe you can only store about 16 minutes (give or take) of uncompressed DV AVI footage on one normal size DVD disk. Of course I would first have to cut up all of my projects into 16 minute segments so that I can put these files on a disk and then I would have to label all of the disks so I could keep track of them. Now if I wanted to bring back all of these files, I’ll have to sit down and spend a couple of hours loading DVD after DVD back into my PC again and then I would have to re-assemble all of the 16 minutes files back together again in an editing app. Storing raw footage on DVDs is not very practical IMO.

      lonlacourt,

      You’re on the right track. An associate of mine uses LaCie and loves them. I think they come with a couple of different interface options too. I suggested that he uses the faster IEEE1394 connections thinking that this will easily keep up with the speed needed for video but he actually went with the USB 2.0 connections instead. I was very surprised to find that the USB connection was able to keep up with the speed needed for video work. He said that he has never had a problem yet.

      Another option that even I have done on occasion is to copy the footage back to MiniDV tapes via firewire and a camera. It’s real time so it takes longer but it’s saved in the originally quality and it involves a lot less switching around. If a tape is getting full, you just stop your editing software from feeding the footage, switch tapes and then you just hit record on your camera and play on your editor and you’re back to storing. Like I said, it takes a little longer but at least you don’t have to baby sit it as much and you don’t have to fool around with a lot of DVDs.

      RAM

    • #170446
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I agree with video-maniac. DVDs and not practical for storage due to the sheer number of discs needed. I recently bought a USB adapter for converting virtually any hard drive into a USB drive. It works with IDE, SATA, notebook, and even optical drives. Only cost $30. Hard drives are cheap enough so I buy a good size one, (recently a 320Gig SATA), plug it in with the USB adapter, move the files I want to save, unplug the drive, (its hot swappable), and box the drive until I need it again. Theres no need to mount the drive inside the tower. This frees up the hard drive space actually inside the computer.

      By the way, USB 2.0 is faster than firewire. The data transfer rates through this adapter are as fast as if it were installed inside your computer.

      I recommend this device for anyone who edits video and wants to save all their work.
      (Vantec SATA/IDE to USB2.0 Adapter @ Newegg.com)

    • #170447
      Avatarstonewall
      Participant

      this is true. usb 2.0 is 480 Mbps where as IEEE1394(firewire) is 400 Mbps. that being said, usb 2.0 is not a sustained data rate wheere as firewire is a sustained stream of 4oo Mbps. I find that the transfer rate for usb 2.0 fluctuates too much for my tastes. I prefer to have my data comming in at a constant rate.

    • #170448
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I stand corrected! :-//

      I think I was looking at USB 1.0 data. Needless to say, I have just been updated.

      As far as IEEE1394 configurations go, there is a IEEE1394 S800 out there that is capable of handling 786 Mbits/s but you have to have the right kind of architecture to handle that. This is pretty much overkill for video already anyway.

      RAM

    • #170449
      Avatarleonlacourt
      Participant

      Ok guys i understand all of your concers about the connection, i plan to connect vias firewire400 thats not a problem. I just want to know wich brand do you recommend me between LaCie or Graid. i read that LaCie uses one big hard drive of 500 Gb on the Big Disk Extreme RAID 0 and that the disk is a PATA disk anyone knows about this. Graid instead uses SATA II drives, 2 to be correct. Which of this do you recomend. Is for editing video DV.

    • #170450
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      You can store 1 to 2 hours of "DVD quality" video on a DVD.

      But then again, my projects aren’t very large, so I don’t need a lot of storage.

    • #170451
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      elderban Wrote:

      You can store 1 to 2 hours of "DVD quality" video on a DVD.

      But then again, my projects aren’t very large, so I don’t need a lot of storage.

      Sure but DV AVI quality is better then DVD quality so why would you store raw footage in a lesser quality for later use?

      At any rate, either youre confused or Im confused. (Ive been known to be that. πŸ˜€ ) The original poster asked what brand of exterior HD would we all recommend. He said that he needs a place to back up or store footage. Now the question is whether its raw or finish footage.

      Granted you can store close to 2 hours of video on a DVD but if you wanted to use that footage again, it will be compressed so your end results will not be as good as it could be when you wanted to use that again. DVD quality is compressed were as DV AVI is not.

      Now in my interpretation, I look at the term footage as being RAW because this is what you draw from to make a finished project of which you would then burn to DVD. I DO archive my finished projects to DVD but I sure dont save footage that I want to use again later on a DVD. Ill either hard drive it or throw it back on a tape.

      If he is storing this footage to be used at a later time, then you wont get 2 hours of high quality AVI video on a DVD. It looks like 20 minutes is about the max.

      RAM

    • #170452
      Avatarleonlacourt
      Participant

      Oki may be is my fualt all the confussion. im talking for storage of RAW mateial for non-linear edting on final cut pro. I plan to go wiht G-Raid because i have read consumer opinions on LaCie and those are bad ones. But if anyone out there could recomend a safer and chepest way to store my raw material for editing and that can offer me som kind of protection, the kind of a RAID 1 configuration, it would be perfect.

Viewing 9 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

The best mirrorless cameras and DSLRs for video β€” 2021

These are the best mirrorless cameras and DSLRs on the market today, organized by use case. All are worthy of your hard-earned dollar.
homicide-bootstrap