transferring analog 8mm to digital

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    • #37656
      AvatarLizzyC2308
      Participant

      I am trying to upload my old analog 8mm tapes to my PC using the RCA connections on my TV-in/tuner card. It all seems to be going well, but I find that I am getting some distortion or interference on the uploaded file. As I watch it upload, on the camera the image is fine, but on the computer there is some interference, the best way to describe it is like when the old tv stations on an antenna would go in and outangled lines on the image. What would cause this? Is there any way to get rid of it?

      On another note, is there any way to clean up the images, or make them clearer? I can only upload as a WMV (I am using Windows Movie Maker to capture), I would prefer AVI. If I convert to AVI afterwards, will the picture improve? I want to create DVD’s for playback on a television screen & am afraid that the image will be all grainy.

      Thanks for the help

      Liz

    • #166918
      Avatarpmorton62
      Participant

      I have a Pinnacle capture card for my computer that I use. I use it with Pinnacle Studio. (I know a lot of people have problems with it, but mine hae been minimal.) I capture 8mm on a regular basis and never have a problem. Captures straight to DV-AVI.

    • #166919
      AvatarLizzyC2308
      Participant

      Actually I notice the “jerking” motion on the video especially if the person recording is walking or moving the camera quickly – it does not show on the analog camera, only on the uploaded video. any ideas???

    • #166920
      AvatarGrinner Hester
      Participant

      Don’t let the interlacing on your computer screen trick ya. MOnitor out of an ntsc monitor or even a tv.

    • #166921
      AvatarXTR-91
      Participant

      Many players and editors with capture capabilities will have some sort of de-interlacing system which converts to progressive during playback. No changes are actually made to the video, but instead adjusted in a way so that it can be played back on computer. Small bits of color lines appear during playback of MPEG-2 interlaced footage with Windows Media Player (having downloaded the proper audio and video codecs).

      Make sure the camcorder is connected properly and capture the video as it is. During the capture process, you should also check for capture information and possibly a “drop meter” (indicating the amount of footage getting dropped during capture).

    • #166922
      AvatarLizzyC2308
      Participant

      Actually when I burn to DVD the jerking motion is still there – is there a display setting I should be looking for – or a setting when I am capturing the video? I am using Windows Movie Maker to capture – I can’t get AVS or Nero to capture the composite.

    • #166923
      AvatarXTR-91
      Participant

      The computer’s display setting should not affect the quality of capture. Have you checked the stability (if the video displays property) on a TV? This may be a tape degradation or camcorder problem. What codec are you capturing? If the analog capture codec (analog to digital conversion) is AVCHD, then you’ll most likely have some sort of “motion-trailing” side affect. The codec for capturing should be DV-AVI for the smoothest and highest quality capture.

    • #166924
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I don’tthink thatWindows Movie Maker has the function but you might need to reverse the fields by selecting “Lower Field First”. I don’t know how much the videos mean to you to convert properly but you may want to look intosome consumer level editing software like Adobe Premiere Elements. It is around $100 and gives you more options (including the field dominance preference) I had the same problem converting and this helped me some.

      Cole

    • #166925
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I should note though that my footage looked fine on the original and on the timeline. But once I exported to DVD it developed the shaking. Reversing the Field Dominance didn’t effect the timeline but did improve the footage on the exported DVD.

      Cole

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