Transferring 8mm to digital

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    • #36579
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I’m trying to copy 8mm film movies by using a Sony Digital8 cam and then capturing it onto the PC using Plextor PX-TV402U. My problem lies with the recording end. Regardless of what speed I copy at (Hi8/Digital8 @SP or Standard8 @ SP/LP, I get flicker (like blinking, not frame shutter). It’s more noticable with lighter frames but still ever present. I thought it may be caused by conflicting frames per second, projector vs. cam, but then it still occurred regardless of speed. This happens throughout the entire copy. By the way, the original does not have any flicker at all. This becomes even more noticable on the PC. How do I correct it, edit it, etc. Any ideas would most useful.

  • #162713
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    How, exactly are you trying to “copy” them?
    Are you taping a projected image?

  • #162714
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    That’s exactly what I’m doing. I’m playing the 8mm reels onto a projector screen and with my Sony HandyCam Dig8/Hi8 camcorder, I’m recording onto Digital8 tapes set for digital at SP. From there, I connected the camcorder to a Plextor ConvertX to digitize and capture to my PC’s hard drive. But, as soon as I record the home movie onto the camcorder, I can see the screen flicker on my preview screen. So the problem relates to the actually recording end.

  • #162715
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    I have a colleague who has had some success doing the same thing. I’ll confer with him, but I’d say it is a frame rate issue. I’ll ask him how he got around it & get back to you.

  • #162716
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks. I tend to think it has something to do with the speed of frames per second on the camcorder vs. the frames per second on the 8mm film being projected. But when I tried using a Standard 8 tape and set for LP, I was still getting the same results, but with degraded resolution.

  • #162717
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    The LP/SP selection really has nothing to do with frame rate, only recording speed, which is giving you your crappy quality. Keep it on SP. I talked to my colleague on the subject, & he confirmed my thoughts of frame rate. Film rolls at 24 frames per second(fps) while video record at 30 fps. If the camera you’re using has a shutter speed option, then you could adjust it to a slower speed. However, I have a Sony D8/Hi8 camera as well,(DCR TRV 120) & it doesn’t have that option. Maybe yours does.
    That being said, you can do alot of research on the Web. There is a lot of detailed info on how to avoid such problems. Google it.
    My 2 cents? You may be able to adjust fps in post-production. Are you using an editing software? I work with Sony Vegas, and it can manipulate frame rate.
    I also upgraded my camera to a Canon GL2, due to the fact that the Sony was not very versatile.
    I’m sorry if this doesn’t help, but there are alot of resources out there. Keep digging.
    Good luck.

  • #162718
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks for the info and direction as to where to search next. One last question regarding frame rate. If I were to find the proper editing software to manipulate the rate in post production, would that effect how a DVD would read it as you’re viewing, or would the software correct fps so that any DVD could read it properly?

  • #162719
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    You could put it on any media you’d like, depending, of course, on the size of the video you’re talking about. But on a file basis, it is rendered as an AVI file, then authored & burnt to DVD.
    I’m using Vegas 4 by Sony. It’s pricy but worth it. It’s packaged with a good DVD Authoring software as well.
    There is also a sizable learning curve.
    You might want to check it out.

  • #162720
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks again. You’ve been very helpful. I will check out Sony Vega. At least now, I have some direction thanks to you.

  • #162721
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    What you need to use is a variable speed projector, unless you have a telecine ($$$) machine.

    As you project the image, check your viewfinder as you adjust the projector’s speed until the flicker disappears. The captured film will play back a bit slower but your editing software can compensate for that. You’ll want to project the image so it’s only about 6″ – 8″ across. And try different “screens” to see which gives you the best results. I used a plain sheet of #92 white paper taped to the wall. The images were crisper on that than on the silver screen I was using. Good Luck.

  • #162722
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    The 8mm projector has a speed adjustment knob which I tried different but slight adjustments and, at the time, just to compensate for peole movement. I will try adjustments but use my swing-out screen (on the cam) to see if I can at least minimize the flicker. Thank you for your advice and also the tip regarding a bright white paper background.

  • #162723
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Step by Step. Film it onto a small heavy matt photo paper, not glossy. Best is smooth cloth, must be very fne fibre and very smooth. Image max size 10 inches wide. Best is 5-6 inches. Build a black cardboard box, project into it with the inside sides painted FLAT black. Connect to the photo paper screen at the end a long piece of cardboard , like a handle so you can gently pull the bottom towards you a bit to angle it, or push it back slightly. Aim your project STRAIGHT on – if it is tilted even a bit, the edges will be slightly out of focus. Aim the Digital camera as close to the projector line of sight as possible. Set up your capture program and view it. Now set your camer on AUTO FOCUS. Attach a piece of printed paper to a long stick. Shine some light into your long box 1 ft wide, 1 foot high and 2 1/2 feet long with the photo paper taped onto the other end facing the camera dn projector. Push the stick up against the screen with the camera on, let is focus. Now turn off the focus. Put it on MANUAL while it is still focusing on it. Take out the piece of paper with print on it you used to focus the camera. Now run your film thru. Constantly adj the speed of the projector to minimize the white flutter. OR – take off the back cover of the projector and spray slick 50 air grease onto the gears. That will help it run smooth. LEAVE it on MANUAL FOCUS. When done and in PC, run an AUTO LEVEL filter through it immediately. This will get rid of some of the white flutter. That is as good as you will get using telecine and a cheap regular projector.
    See http://www.dvdhomevideoeditor.com – they have a tutorial that is no BS and straigh forward. You can print it.

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