Training Development for Profit?

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    • #43381
      Avatardesigncbts
      Participant

      As a newly minted “Forum Host”, I would like to offer a topic some of you may find useful.

      For a short while, I used to create aircraft maintenance training. It’s actually why I started shooting video. I was a noncommissioned officer in the USAF, stationed at Travis AFB, CA. During the transition from 35mm slide projectors to computers our old training programs were abandoned. This concerned me so much I taught myself how to create CBTs. In the U.S. military we have regulations and standards for everything. I used Instructional Systems Development guidelinesto create programs thatwere used to train new aircraft mechanics for certain tasks.

      Ilearned that the field of CBTs was burgeoning with high-priced software. This is still true today. However, I discovered a video game creation program that did the trick. It was called “Klik and Play”. It took me a while to learn this program but the results were extremely satisfying. Since then, I’ve graduated to Multimedia Fusion Developer 2.A fewproblems I have is that I haven’t been able to teach myself how to utilize shareable content (SCORM) or how to link test results with a database (online or otherwise).

      My point here is, you too can create training. Here’s a link to the software I use: http://www.clickteam.com/website/usa/index.html

      How many of you have attempted to create training, either computer-based (CBT) or stand-alone video?

      If you create CBTs, what software do you use?

  • #182076
    Avatarbirdcat
    Participant

    I did a few training vids several years ago – I used Camtasia Studio to record the PC screen and Vegas to edit and add voiceover.

  • #182077
    AvatarBruceMol
    Participant

    I used a variety of programs for screen capture, Camtasia, Captivate and MS Media encoder. Captivate makes it really easy to use SCORM and mark tests, notify people of results; very $ for an independent to buy and maintain if you don’t have a regular customer. Camtasia, in my opinion, gives a lot of bang for the buck and I use that for a few different customers. I also like that the new PowerPoint can turn slide shows into a video making it really easy to use screen captures from customer PC’s, a little audio narration, and presto!

  • #182078
    Avatardesigncbts
    Participant

    Excellent! Dreamweaver also has question objects and such. It’s amazing how we are able to tailor these softwares into useable products πŸ™‚

  • #182079
    Avatardesigncbts
    Participant

    Birdcat and Bruce,

    May I ask what your projects were?

  • #182080
    AvatarJackWolcott
    Participant

    Welcome on board, Ed!

    A great deal of our business is centered on creating training DVDs. We recently completed a project with one of the Seattle area hospitals, for example, in which we created a DVD that accompanies each homeward bound patient who has had hip or knee replacement surgery, teaching them how to care for their incisions and how to negotiate stairs, cars, walkers, etc. Projects such as this often require us to include PowerPoint material from nurses, clinicians and physicians and technical materials supplied supplied on tape, CD or DVD by pharmaceutical and medical equipment manufacturers. We have to work with pretty much any format or source that’s thrown at us.

    Our most recent project, over 5 months in completion, documented all the training on the recently completed Port of Seattle Car Rental Facility. On this project we taped both classroom instruction and on-site demonstration by manufacturer and systems development representatives on all the mechanical, electrical, reporting and alarm systems in the facility.

    Jack

  • #182081
    Avatardesigncbts
    Participant

    Jack, excellent! Would you consider incorporating computer-based training development into your portfolio? This would enable you to create tests, where you could measure a subject’s undestanding of the topic. Depending upon the authoring software, you could also track each student’s progress. The software I use enables me to create simple games. Somteimes I use this to provide incentive for an individual to score 100%. My point is that this capability is easily within your grasp, cheaply. However, could you make use of it?

    A brief, yet comprehensive, tutorial can be found here: http://www.ehow.com/how_6520266_create-computer-based-training-software.html This simple expanation pretty much follows the USAF instruction of instructional systems development. There are a few caveats though – Gear your training to the lowest level of education that your customer’s trainees possess. Also, do not include test questions (trick)that your material does not cover.

  • #182082
    AvatarJackWolcott
    Participant

    Thanks for the information. It’s interesting, but I really don’t have any opportunity to use it at this time. We’re working for clients who call the shots; we have virtually no latitude with regard to how the training sessions are conducted or what the content is.

    The construction DVDs are used primarily for reference and the training of engineers and maintenance people new to the site after the original training has been done, and the medical material is generated and reviewed entirely in the hospital or by the physicians.

    I’ve been involved in computer based instructional development since 1985. You can read about this early work, if you’re interested, at http://www.videoccasions-nw.com/history/ntrview.html. But unfortunately, as I’ve said, I have very little opportunity to be involved in the instructional materials we’re videotaping.

    Jack

  • #182083
    Avatarbirdcat
    Participant

    @ed – it was a hbow to for some propriet5ary in house stuff we were rolling out worldwide

  • #182084
    AvatarYvon
    Participant

    Hi,

    Here is few software to use for training and DVD production :

    Adobe Captivate 5,5 (new 6.0 available soon) the best for training and exams with scoring

    Camtasia Studio 7 (soon version 8.0) the best to combine video and slide from PowerPointalso exams or question but last part is very elementary compare to Adobe

    Autoplay 8 from Indigo Rose this is similar to Power Point but much, much powerfull due to script

    For video software near any software can fit but my favorite is Avid Studio 1 due to compatibility and low price.

    For exams use ProProfs, free to try and compatible both PC and Apple.

    If you use PowerPoint you have to transfer to Camtasia or Adobe but this is an additional step that I don’t like (time consumming for nothing) but an option if you have material previously created.

    Regards,

    YR

  • #182085
    Avatarjsachanda
    Member

    Ed, I think you have made an immediate contribution to the community. I am thrilled to see some solid sharing of resources and a real niche business opportunity. While I have been exposed to computer based training in the past, I had not thought of it as an product for an independent producer. Obviously generating income from this product will depend on finding the right customer or topic of interest. The gaming format fits right in to the current generation’s interest & ability. I am curious to see examples ofCBT not produced by the the big companies for big clients. Keep up the good work.

  • #182086
    AvatarBruceMol
    Participant

    A few years ago I used Captivate when I was training health care clerks & mgrs. how to use scheduling software, i.e. finding the right patient in the db, booking appt.’s associating lab results with files. Quizzes, word matches, email advisories upon completion. Because I was also a MS Software trainer, I made screen capture videos to promote taking the courses at the training centre i.e how to convert your Visio org chart into an Excel spreadsheet (to pass around the dept. to update info) and then covert your updated Excel spreadsheet info back into an org chart. The video was fades between screen shots of both products and the call to actions was ‘enroll and be more efficient.’

    I currently use Camtasia for anything that needs notes, or arrows, high lighting etc. for a software company I regularly work for – I don’t use the testing functions in Camtasia because I’m mostly making HELP type tutorials. i.e. “to find a customer, do this…” I also make the same type videos for in-house use, mostly abbreviated How To’s for people who are familiar with the software but need a reminder about how to do something.

    Camtasia makes it easy to convert PowerPoint to videos for in-house use. Now, of course, PowerPoint renders it’s own video but before that I would take people slide shows, again in health care, and make narrated videos for kiosks or customer Intranet. Such dramatic titles as “Infection Control” ” The Benefits of Breast Feeding” and “Food Safety for Seniors” ah, those heady days!

    Before Camtasia and Captivate I used to walk around with a copy of MS Media Encoder to screen capture software processes and then dump them in to ULEAD (now Corel) to narrate and turn into video. Actually, it was that process, and how long it took, that rationalized the purchase of Captivate when I was training health care professionals.

    Lastly, before media encoder, I was making training documents for inventory control in the amber screen days of computing. Take screen shots and turn the whole annotated process into PowerPoint PPS files and burn to CD’s for distribution.

  • #182087
    Avatarbirdcat
    Participant

    @BruceMol – Back in those amber screen days the original IBM and many other brands of CGA cards (320 X 240 and later 640 X 480) had a composite video out jack. I used to use Show Partner (precursor to PowerPoint) to make titles and graphics I would put into videos I made on VHS tapes (mostly family but a few customers). I believe it was around 1984???

  • #182088
    AvatarBruceMol
    Participant

    ah, the good old days!

    My first “PowerPoint” slideshow actually was a slide show. New to video people will find this laughable but before video out and video cards, PowerPoint was for text only and you had to get slides made – yes SLIDES! Which you put in a slide projector with the slides of the images you wanted to show(cause there was no such thing as a media projector) …OMG! Did we really do that thinking ‘we are so high tech!’

  • #182089
    AvatarJackWolcott
    Participant

    Bruce: I remember it well! We were so paranoid about things getting lost when we did out of town presentations that we’d have a floppy with the PowerPoint and a rack of slides that we carried with our carry-on luggage and would mail or FedEx a box with a duplicate floppy and slide set to our hotel.

    Jack

  • #182090
    Avatardesigncbts
    Participant

    These are perfect examples how technology has changed the corporate/financial landscape. The technological advances in training have made it possible for folks like us to capitalize on new business opportunities.

    That said, it’s a two-edges sword. Since most of us don’t have degrees in education (Jack excepted), we need to be careful how we develop &market training products…

  • #182091
    AvatarBruceMol
    Participant

    Birdcat…waaaay before me! That was DOS, I began with WIN 3.11 (for work groups) on PC’s. Before that it was DEC VMS VAXEN 128 bit architecture network computing; 1992 ish.

    Jack. Not sure the paranoia is smaller, but the media backups are!

    Ed. I’m glad your wrote that because a lot of people don’t understand the development of training material very well. Accounting software doesn’t make someone an accountant, CBT software doesn’t make someone an educator. STAND BACK! I GOTZ AN M.ED. AND I’M NOT AFRAID TO USE IT.

    …and this just arrived from Techsmith, maker of CAMTASIA – no I’m not affiliated!

    http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia-8-pr-coming-soon.html?utm_source=cs8pr&utm_medium=email_nurture&utm_campaign=cw8

  • #182092
    Avatardesigncbts
    Participant

    So, here’s an avenue that an aspiring trainer can use to become qualified: http://www.langevin.com/?gclid=COXZk9HmvLACFQZtKgod-QgRnw In addition to my USAF certification, I attended Langevin workshops. They are pricey but well worth the expense!

  • #182093
    AvatarJackWolcott
    Participant

    Birdcat: You bring back fond memories. In 1987 my lab was being underwritten by IBM. The company gave us a prototype program called Storyboard, followed by Storyboard Plus. Unfortunately they only supported it for a couple of years before taking it off the market. It was essentially a branching yes-no if/then structure that could be combined with drawings, but not video in those days, to produce instructional materials. This was followed by a program called Guide, developed in Scotland by Ian Richie. It was really the precursor to hypertext and permitted developers to create extensive complex branching and decision making materials. It also provided code links to a Pioneer laser disc player; the discs could be addressed frame by frame, and a series of frames could provide the illusion of motion. Pretty heavy stuff for the 1980s.

    Criterion issued several films on laser disc at about that time. I remember stepping frame by frame through the dissolves in Orson Wells’ Citizen Kane to illustrate the concept of a matched dissolve. They’re brilliant!

    For us, video in training and educational materials didn’t become practical until we received a beta version of Intel’s video capture card which finally allowed us to bring live video into the computer. This was about 1989 or ’90.

    Ed, it’s really great that you introduced this thread. The responses have been wonderful.

    Jack

  • #182094
    Avatarbillmecca
    Participant

    I haven’t created any training programs like that, but I do voiceover work for a company that does. Last time I spoke with her she told me she uses Powerpoint and then Articulate (iirc) and it includes tests etc. I record the voiceover and cut it into short wav files corresponding to each slide. so am well versed in shipping rules and regulations both international and domestic for a major cosmetics corporation, as well as their fire evacuation plans. LOL

  • #182095
    AvatarBruceMol
    Participant

    Ed,

    i too can recommend Lanegvin, I didn’t take there courses but they’ve given me permission to use some of their excellent material in the instructor dev courses I lead at a local college.

  • #182096
    Avatardesigncbts
    Participant

    I’m very happy that several folks are finding this thread useful. I am very excited to see experienced subject matter experts readily available. A HUGE thanks in advance for any videographer(s) who will no doubt be picking your brains in the future!!!

  • #182097
    Avatardesigncbts
    Participant

    Here’s a little tidbit, I learned during one of my Langevin classes – When you create test questions, it’s never a good idea to include negative reinforcement for a wrong answer (screams, name-calling like LOSER, etc.) It’s O.K. to to inform the student that the answer is incorrect but you don’t want to embarrass them.

    This pertains to frames you would create in a computer-based training program.I hope to post a couple of examples in the next day or so…

  • #182098
    Avatardesigncbts
    Participant

    It’s been a while since this thread has seen any action. Here’s a little tidbit from my brochure:

    How Can A Training Program Help My Business?

    Increased Revenue:

    Employees who are instructed how to do their jobs, at the outset of their employment, are much less likely to make mistakes. Fewer mistakes = More production, satisfied customers, proud employees and greater profit!

  • #182099
    Avatardesigncbts
    Participant

    Time for another training development “morsel” (cue evil laugh).

    Using video for computer based training development can be very useful…or counter productive, if you don’t plan your shots wisely. I recommend creating a storyboardwith your subject matter expert(s) (SME). They know what’s important for the task at hand. You would want to complement each others expertise – although your SME may want to show how to change a component in a tight space, you may not have the room to get a camera in position. In this instance, you may compromise by using a drawing. Anyway, creating a storyboard may also help you with your lesson plan, task list, etc…

    Try avoid shots that don’t add value. Talking heads are only good for a few moments – After all, you definitely don’t want to lose your audience!

  • #182100
    AvatarBruceMol
    Participant

    Ah! but you can do all sorts of things with a talking head! For instance if you are making a training video from a ppt presentation, and the speaker has great expressions, you combine the head and the ppt into one. There is nothing worse than a dull speaker though so its valuable to have planned cut aways like examples, samples and screen captures. Though NLE’s are more flexible, I did try Microsofts free PowerPoint Producer, a decade ago, which provide a variety of headshot/presentation templates.

  • #182101
    Avatardesigncbts
    Participant

    Bruce, Of course you are correct. The VideoMaker team proves that with their informational videos. Cut aways are essential though, to maintain audience focus.

    Computer-based training programs can take advantage of interactivity that DVDs or streaming video can’t offer. The software you use is up to you. I prefer Multimedia Fusion Developer and Dreamweaver. There are a multitude of software packages available. The beauty of these is that you can allow the user to navigate, take review quizzes and/or an end of module test. I like to add in a simple video game the student can play – if they score 100%.

    You use what you have available. I am impressed with the creativity that you and the others have shown with the tools you’ve had at hand!

    My main point (in this installment) is that storyboards are just as important in computer-based training development as they are for successful video planning.

  • #182102
    SpectateSwampSpectateSwamp
    Participant

    My app can do it all.

    I shoot tons of political forum video. Stupid questions followed by even dumber answers. Followed by a very tuff critique.

    Could be just as easily be a test question with video or audio answer possibly followed by more large text.

    And it can run random by Group. Without random you got boredom

    Run a background audio for the displayed picture or video file. No propitiatory software needed, super easy to distribute.

    I’ll provide a few templates to run from a USB stick. When you can see how it works, it’s easy to pick up on.

  • #182103
    AvatarBruceMol
    Participant

    True Ed, storyboards really do help out; even in the same way they use it in Hollywood, to ‘sell’ the idea to management! Oh yeah, and guide the creative process. In mini form, storyboard images are a great way to illustrate decision tree ‘flowcharts’ of possible user interactions.

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